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Med School In The UK For American

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doomoo123

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I am sophomore currently going for my BA in Psychology here in the states. After undergraduate, I plan on going to med school and eventually become a psychiatrist. I've already done some research but I am absolutely confused as most of the other questions already asked don't all fit into my specific circumstance.

I was wondering how is it like to attend medical school in the UK. (eg. how long are med school generally there including the specialization on a specific field (psychiatry) after med school, pre-requisite, etc) I do plan on applying to US med school but I also want to consider UK med school as an option. I know that for the UK med schools/international med schools you don't need to do the MCAT like here in the US and getting into a med school here is very competitive here, but not to say it isn't in the UK as well. I'm also considering studying med school in the UK because my overall plan in my life is to eventually live and be a psychiatrist there in the UK when I get older and if I get into a med school there then it'll just be that I'll be there earlier in my life opposed to going to med school here, establishing myself as a doctor here and then moving there. Also, since I am considering applying to US med school, I am doing the pre-requisite for them right now (organic chemistry, other chem classes, physics, etc)

I was also wondering how difficult it will be for me to get a job in the UK if I do graduate from a med school there. This is a big factor that I really want to consider this because even though it's possible to go back to the US it'll be quite difficult so I'd rather stay there. If it's hard to get a job as a doctor there in the UK then I think I'll just stay here and become a doctor and just move to the UK when I'm established (which has always been my original plan)
 
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Medstart108

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    I am sophomore currently going for my BA in Psychology here in the states. After undergraduate, I plan on going to med school and eventually become a psychiatrist. I've already done some research but I am absolutely confused as most of the other questions already asked don't all fit into my specific circumstance.

    I was wondering how is it like to attend medical school in the UK. (eg. how long are med school generally there including the specialization on a specific field (psychiatry) after med school, pre-requisite, etc) I do plan on applying to US med school but I also want to consider UK med school as an option. I know that for the UK med schools/international med schools you don't need to do the MCAT like here in the US and getting into a med school here is very competitive here, but not to say it isn't in the UK as well. I'm also considering studying med school in the UK because my overall plan in my life is to eventually live and be a psychiatrist there in the UK when I get older and if I get into a med school there then it'll just be that I'll be there earlier in my life opposed to going to med school here, establishing myself as a doctor here and then moving there. Also, since I am considering applying to US med school, I am doing the pre-requisite for them right now (organic chemistry, other chem classes, physics, etc)

    I was also wondering how difficult it will be for me to get a job in the UK if I do graduate from a med school there. This is a big factor that I really want to consider this because even though it's possible to go back to the US it'll be quite difficult so I'd rather stay there. If it's hard to get a job as a doctor there in the UK then I think I'll just stay here and become a doctor and just move to the UK when I'm established (which has always been my original plan)

    Well its 5/6 years medical school (6 if you do an intercalated year), 2 years of Foundation training then you enter Psych specialty training.

    Your citizenship, assuming US, won't hurt you until you apply for specialty training. There is a preference for EU citizens in applying for specialty training and not everyone gets their choice so it does matter. If you get married before you apply you can be an EU citizen and so avoid the headache. I believe psych is relatively less competitive.

    If you can get into US MD schools you probably have a shot at UK medical schools. You need to take the UKCAT when applying and there are many different requirements. Some medical schools will have GEM programs that are 4 years long for people with BA or BS, although not all of them accept internationals.

    Overall, i'd recommend just staying in the US. If you ever change your mind the US is just the safer option.
     

    doomoo123

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    Well its 5/6 years medical school (6 if you do an intercalated year), 2 years of Foundation training then you enter Psych specialty training.

    Your citizenship, assuming US, won't hurt you until you apply for specialty training. There is a preference for EU citizens in applying for specialty training and not everyone gets their choice so it does matter. If you get married before you apply you can be an EU citizen and so avoid the headache. I believe psych is relatively less competitive.

    If you can get into US MD schools you probably have a shot at UK medical schools. You need to take the UKCAT when applying and there are many different requirements. Some medical schools will have GEM programs that are 4 years long for people with BA or BS, although not all of them accept internationals.

    Overall, i'd recommend just staying in the US. If you ever change your mind the US is just the safer option.

    I suppose it is more practical to just stay here in the US for med school than go to the UK. It seems as if it will be just as tough and complicated in the long run.
     

    bambi

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    Well its 5/6 years medical school (6 if you do an intercalated year), 2 years of Foundation training then you enter Psych specialty training.

    Your citizenship, assuming US, won't hurt you until you apply for specialty training. There is a preference for EU citizens in applying for specialty training and not everyone gets their choice so it does matter. If you get married before you apply you can be an EU citizen and so avoid the headache. I believe psych is relatively less competitive.

    If you can get into US MD schools you probably have a shot at UK medical schools. You need to take the UKCAT when applying and there are many different requirements. Some medical schools will have GEM programs that are 4 years long for people with BA or BS, although not all of them accept internationals.

    Overall, i'd recommend just staying in the US. If you ever change your mind the US is just the safer option.

    Better to say if you can get into a UK medical school you can get into a US one. Stay in the US, it's just not worth the hassle.
     
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