Dec 10, 2013
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I am 23 years old and I plan on applying to medical schools in about three years. Right now I am studying at a community college, I will be transferring to a state University next year where I will finish up my science class pre-reqs for the MCAT. I have two questions regarding preparing for Medical school. What are some solid Bachelors degrees that would increase my chances of getting into Medical school? I have considered Biology, Biochemistry, Exercise Science, Kinesiology and Human Movement Science. Any suggestions to that list? Also what is the best way to prepare for the MCAT and when should I begin studying for that? Thanks!
 

1TB4RKSB4CK

wussup doge
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May 6, 2010
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Math degrees lololol
I would lean towards a degree that suits your personal interest as med schools care little about your degree and more of your grades. I recall one of the posters here got a 42 with a Psychology degree, so I wouldn't say that one degree would give an advantage over the other simply based on the courses taken. There are we helpful degrees in a sense that you are honing more advanced bs or ps concepts, but as stated, they only go through the basic sciences tested on your prereqs. If you follow the outline, you can cover the topics needed to be well prepared for the MCAT.
 
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Johnny Appleseed
Dec 10, 2013
474
344
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Medical Student
Math degrees lololol
I would lean towards a degree that suits your personal interest as med schools care little about your degree and more of your grades. I recall one of the posters here got a 42 with a Psychology degree, so I wouldn't say that one degree would give an advantage over the other simply based on the courses taken. There are we helpful degrees in a sense that you are honing more advanced bs or ps concepts, but as stated, they only go through the basic sciences tested on your prereqs. If you follow the outline, you can cover the topics needed to be well prepared for the MCAT.
Thanks for the suggestions! Where can I find the MCAT outline?
 

Next Step Tutor

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Your major's irrelevant. I was a philosophy major and got a 41. The guy who wrote the EK books was a history major and scored a 40-something (IIRC).

Since basically all of your scholastic decisions are going to be made for you once you start med school, your college major is your "last" chance to study something that's fun and interesting for you. If you like what you're doing, you'll get better grades.

The key is less what topic you're studying and more that you're studying well and thoroughly. The basic habits of good critical reading, hard work, focus, and learning matter much more to MCAT/med school success than whether you spent that time reading about the Critical Legal Studies Movement, or Erikson's Stages of Development, or whatever.
 
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Johnny Appleseed
Dec 10, 2013
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Next Step Tutor

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I have three years probably before I take the test.
In that case make sure you're looking at the outlines for the new 2015 version of the MCAT. There's a *ton* of changes coming.
 
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Johnny Appleseed
Dec 10, 2013
474
344
Status
Medical Student
Your major doesn't really matter for admissions purposes.

MCAT content outlines can be found here: https://www.aamc.org/students/applying/mcat/preparing/
Your major's irrelevant. I was a philosophy major and got a 41. The guy who wrote the EK books was a history major and scored a 40-something (IIRC).

Since basically all of your scholastic decisions are going to be made for you once you start med school, your college major is your "last" chance to study something that's fun and interesting for you. If you like what you're doing, you'll get better grades.

The key is less what topic you're studying and more that you're studying well and thoroughly. The basic habits of good critical reading, hard work, focus, and learning matter much more to MCAT/med school success than whether you spent that time reading about the Critical Legal Studies Movement, or Erikson's Stages of Development, or whatever.
Would you suggest beginning to prepare for MCAT now? Will the pre-req classes cover all the information I need to know? I would like to begin preparing early so I feel comfortable and confident when I take the test.