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Does it hurt to ask a school from which you've been accepted if they would give a scholarship to you (they've alreadygiven out all of them I think) if you were accepted to another who has already offered a large one to you? I don't know if this is poor etiquitte or if it actually has worked for anyone?

Thanks!
 
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also, what do they look @ when giving "merit" scholarships? are these stats heavy or just basically anything that makes them really want you.
 

naijaboi

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You've been accepted, they cannot rescind your offer. Just tell them that you would like to attend their school, but the cost is give you a cause for pause. If they like and wanted to keep you, they'll offer to help you out. It can't hurt to ask.

Also, May 15 is fast approaching, I am guessing some merit based scholarship holders might decline their acceptance and scholarship offers. Maybe you'll be next in line to receive the offer.
 

d1ony5u5

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I second the above post. Simply ask. Financials are an issue for almost everybody, and if you've already got one scholarship, you probably fulfill the requirements to receive another!

It would only be bad etiquette if you start demanding one and calling names everyone that answers. Otherwise, it's very legitimate. I'd do it. The likely thing is that they'll just tell you "no" and nothing else (going by simple probability, not making assumptions about you). On the other hand, if they really like you and find out that you already have incentives to go elsewhere, it may tip the balance in your favor!

PS: As I understand them, Merit scholarships are based on academics mostly (GPA and maybe MCAT). Just something that demonstrates a high achievement, so it could also be something else that they consider worthy, like overcoming adverse situations, etc.
 

DrBowtie

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also, what do they look @ when giving "merit" scholarships? are these stats heavy or just basically anything that makes them really want you.
Mainly stats unless you did a Rhodes or Marshall.
 
Jan 5, 2010
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I second the above post. Simply ask. Financials are an issue for almost everybody, and if you've already got one scholarship, you probably fulfill the requirements to receive another!

It would only be bad etiquette if you start demanding one and calling names everyone that answers. Otherwise, it's very legitimate. I'd do it. The likely thing is that they'll just tell you "no" and nothing else (going by simple probability, not making assumptions about you). On the other hand, if they really like you and find out that you already have incentives to go elsewhere, it may tip the balance in your favor!

PS: As I understand them, Merit scholarships are based on academics mostly (GPA and maybe MCAT). Just something that demonstrates a high achievement, so it could also be something else that they consider worthy, like overcoming adverse situations, etc.
Do I mention the school's name that have given me to the scholarship to the one that hasn't in the "bargaining"?

Also, what would be the best format? email, call, or go in person?
 

d1ony5u5

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Do I mention the school's name that have given me to the scholarship to the one that hasn't in the "bargaining"?

Also, what would be the best format? email, call, or go in person?

I definitely would if they are in the same tier reputation-wise, or the one that gave you the scholarship is in a higher one. If it is lower, I would not make it obvious, just refer to it as "another school" and tell them which if they ask. My rationale for that is that maybe they would assume that their better ranking should be enough to pull you to their side (an assumption).

For this kind of thing, I would call first and broadly explain the situation to try to make an appointment (not being exact, just with blanket statements like: "I'd like to discuss my financial situation with the director of Financial aid, or someone else who could help me"). If you get an appointment, take all the documents to support your case and be your own advocate. If they don't give you one, just ask to talk to someone in the higher level administration, who can likely make decisions of this sort or give you a good authoritative answer/advise. The initial phone call could be substituted for an email, but you would have to be really careful with your wording, so as to not make yourself sound demanding/entitled or something like that.

In summary, strive to get the opportunity to talk one on one with some one of authority. If that fails, try to talk by phone. I just feel that these things are better expressed actively than passively.

Good luck!!