Feb 26, 2011
7
0
Status
General Question:

when applying for medical licensure, how should applicants address questions related to disciplinary issues/probation/resignation/termination etc?

Should attached explanations be limited and strictly objective and factual? (think, timeline)
Or facts with the addition of a personal subjective narrative?

Are applications for permanent licensure more rigorous that training license?

Ideas, Opinions, & Advice, appreciated!
 

gutonc

No Meat, No Treat
Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Mar 6, 2005
18,360
11,315
Status
Attending Physician
General Question:

when applying for medical licensure, how should applicants address questions related to disciplinary issues/probation/resignation/termination etc?

Should attached explanations be limited and strictly objective and factual? (think, timeline)
Or facts with the addition of a personal subjective narrative?
Facts. That's it. Bring your emotions into it and you're inviting a world of pain that you really don't want.

Are applications for permanent licensure more rigorous that training license?
Yes.
 
OP
M
Feb 26, 2011
7
0
Status
Facts. That's it. Bring your emotions into it and you're inviting a world of pain that you really don't want.


Yes.
Thanks for the advice. So, should advise them to save the genuine "learned from my mistake, worked on my issue, never happen again" for a later time?
 

aProgDirector

Pastafarians Unite!
Moderator
10+ Year Member
Oct 11, 2006
8,280
7,162
Status
Attending Physician
Thanks for the advice. So, should advise them to save the genuine "learned from my mistake, worked on my issue, never happen again" for a later time?
If by "later time" you mean "when they make you come before the board and testify as to the issues in your application", yes.
 
OP
M
Feb 26, 2011
7
0
Status
If by "later time" you mean "when they make you come before the board and testify as to the issues in your application", yes.
So, they will most likely inevitably find themselves before the board? Is this routine or automatic for anyone that responds "yes" to unusual circumstances (discipline/probation/termination/resignations)
 

gutonc

No Meat, No Treat
Staff member
Administrator
10+ Year Member
Mar 6, 2005
18,360
11,315
Status
Attending Physician
So, they will most likely inevitably find themselves before the board? Is this routine or automatic for anyone that responds "yes" to unusual circumstances (discipline/probation/termination/resignations)
It's going to be state dependent. So either be less vague about your circumstances or just accept the advice and uncertainty that you've got at the moment.
 

typhoonegator

Neurointensivist
Moderator
10+ Year Member
Dec 22, 2006
1,868
865
Boston
Status
Attending Physician
If it's for a malpractice case, you can have your lawyer help you craft a purely factual synopsis, which includes what happened and the ultimate result. For board issues, you should mention the investigation and how it was closed (disciplinary action, letter of advice, etc.). You want to avoid editorializing, moralizing, or "justification". I've seen residents who tried to provide too little or way too much information in hopes that it would speed their application along, and it never works.

They will either be satisfied by the facts and/or the disciplinary actions meted out at the time of the event, or they won't and you'll need to provide follow-up information either in person or in written form. Really varies by state, but given the number of docs out there, plenty of them end up with the yes box checked off at some point or another, even if it's just for a malpractice case in which you were named and then dropped. Some state boards conduct an inquiry of anyone named in a suit no matter what -- so that's two check boxes right there even if there was no discipline. Training licenses are nothing compared to the real thing.
 
OP
M
Feb 26, 2011
7
0
Status
If it's for a malpractice case, you can have your lawyer help you craft a purely factual synopsis, which includes what happened and the ultimate result. For board issues, you should mention the investigation and how it was closed (disciplinary action, letter of advice, etc.). You want to avoid editorializing, moralizing, or "justification". I've seen residents who tried to provide too little or way too much information in hopes that it would speed their application along, and it never works.

They will either be satisfied by the facts and/or the disciplinary actions meted out at the time of the event, or they won't and you'll need to provide follow-up information either in person or in written form. Really varies by state, but given the number of docs out there, plenty of them end up with the yes box checked off at some point or another, even if it's just for a malpractice case in which you were named and then dropped. Some state boards conduct an inquiry of anyone named in a suit no matter what -- so that's two check boxes right there even if there was no discipline. Training licenses are nothing compared to the real thing.
@typhoonegator: No, it's definitely not malpractice. I believe its regarding an academic or non-academic remediation or probation of sorts during their residency. Thanks for the advice!