May 18, 2009
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Hi guys,

Becoming interested in ophtho but not sure if surgery is going to be right for me. If I decide to become a general, comprehensive medical ophthalmologist, what would this do to my ability to work where I want, such as in urban centers? Is there a demand for a clinic-based medical ophthalmologist?
 

200UL

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Jul 13, 2008
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If one is to graduate from resicidency as an "ophthalmologist" in 2010, they must be competent in surgery according to the ACGME. This is true for all surgical subspecialties according to the ACGME. Because of this, a tremendous amount of time is spent on making ophthalmology residents surgeons.

The days of graduating a resident but encouraging a "medical" career should be over. I am not sure this is always the case, however.

I believe the job market for a medical ophthalmologist would be good, however. Ophthalmology residency allows a tremendous amount of pathology to be encountered (both medical and surgical) - surgeons who love surgery may like someone that so well trained even if they do not perform micro-surgery.

Fields like uveitis, ocular pathology, medical retina, neuro-ophthalmology also allow one to do minor surgical procedures.
 

7ontheline

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I think you're going to have a very difficult time finding a job unless you do something like neuro-ophth, medical retina, or path as the previous poster mentioned. If you're just a general ophthalmologist, you won't be able to compete with all the docs who can do everything you do PLUS surgery. If you want to be in a big city, forget it. It's hard enough to find jobs, much less with one (surgical) hand tied behind your back.