Medical school asking me to fill out a form about my health

Vivladi

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A medical school I'll be attending in the fall is asking me to fill out a form about my health including psychiatric health and medications I'm taking. This is separate from the forms I've filled out about immunizations and communicable diseases. How should I proceed? I am wildly uncomfortable disclosing this information and I don't know why its necessary.
 
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FutureInternist

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Do they have a way of knowing your medical history?
I don’t think its any of their business, although licensing boards also ask this.
Since you are just getting your foot in the door, and (I assume), no one at the school knows you or your history, I would not fill out any psychiatric issues.
This can, and will, be used against you at any point, whenever you get into any argument, debate etc with a lecturer, dean or attending.
It will colour everything you say and do.

If somehow your pill bottle falls out of your bag, in a room full of your classmates, and you are asked about it, you could just “backdate” your diagnosis to just after the start of the school year and they will have no way to know its BS.

Good Luck
 
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readmypostsMD

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So if a school asks you for a list of your sexual partners and practices you have to tell them because they ask for it? It's none of their business.

WTF does your second comment have to do with anything?

I mean, he has a point about being an honest doctor. I presume the school has the right to ask for this information? My medical forms asked for medication, too, and it’s my duty to be honest... in theory. If I take X for Y, but don’t list that on my form, that’s lying.

I guess I don’t fully understand the rules and regulations around med schools having access to your health records though. I presume they don’t have the legal right to them because they’re not treating you?
 

Fidelio17

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I mean, he has a point about being an honest doctor. I presume the school has the right to ask for this information? My medical forms asked for medication, too, and it’s my duty to be honest... in theory. If I take X for Y, but don’t list that on my form, that’s lying.

I guess I don’t fully understand the rules and regulations around med schools having access to your health records though. I presume they don’t have the legal right to them because they’re not treating you?

...schools will ask you for many things that you're not obligated to answer. Your med school is not your doctor. Your med school is not a licensing board. (Also, despite how friendly the faculty may seem, your med school is not your friend.) Your med school is not entitled to your PHI. Frankly, I don't see what use they could have for that information that benefits you.

& in this day & age, the idea of needing that info to provide a medical history in case you need emergency care while at school & can't communicate yourself isn't even relevant. You'll likely access routine care via the hospital network affiliated with your med school, & that's the same network that you'd be taken to if you needed emergency care. In that case, the ER will already have access to your EMR. They won't need it from your medical school.
 
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readmypostsMD

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...schools will ask you for many things that you're not obligated to answer. Your med school is not your doctor. Your med school is not a licensing board. (Also, despite how friendly the faculty may seem, your med school is not your friend.) Your med school is not entitled to your PHI. Frankly, I don't see what use they could have for that information that benefits you.

& in this day & age, the idea of needing that info to provide a medical history in case you need emergency care while at school & can't communicate yourself isn't even relevant. You'll likely access routine care via the hospital network affiliated with your med school, & that's the same network that you'd be taken to if you needed emergency care. In that case, the ER will already have access to your EMR. They won't need it from your medical school.

So why do they ask for medical information at all?
 
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So why do they ask for medical information at all?
I surmise that the info is for Student Services and could aid in getting .accommodations.

You could inquire in the school specific forum how others dealt with this.
 
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@premed1875 Try getting in contact with upper classmen and ask them how to navigate this question.

These questions don't pass the sniff test.
Not saying I agree with them being on the app form, but I can guarantee you that those questions were vetted by University lawyers.
 
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M&L

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This is so weird. Honestly, i am now trying to remember if our school made us fill out something like that. Medical forms for vaccinations - yes. But i honestly dont remember filling out anything like this.
I worked in mental health field for years, and, honestly, i would not encourage any of my pts or clients from addiction treatment facilities to volunteer information. Things like this can really ruin your opportunities if you are not careful. That being said, i do believe that anyone who has a history of any mental health illnesses should have a very good talk with their treating physician and their treating psychiatrist, as well as, probably, their support system (family, friends) before medical school or similarly stressful career, but otherwise- i agree, it is private information.

and for those who might question my commitment to authority because of this post :)))))))), i am a veteran, and i pay taxes. ,
 

DrOngoGablogian

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It means stop questioning authority and stop making excuses.

This is the great misunderstanding of the times. Between fists and faces exists the law. You should respect what is required by the law and precisely nothing more, just as authority should enforce what is required by the law and precisely nothing more. Failure of either party to abide is where problems arise.
 
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FutureInternist

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You have to be honest. I mean would you want a dishonest doctor treating you? Be honest and leave the rest to God.

A very polite but firm F....... NO to that.

Also disagree w/ asking upper classmen since that will prompt them to ask why you’re asking.

Don’t write in N/A if you can get away with it, since leaving it blank can be chalked up to a “mistake” by you but stating N/A is lying and can be used as an “unprofessional” tag on you. (just like when gov forms ask you if you plan to overthrow the gov or are a member of a terrorist org... no one will say yes but if they catch you lying, they don’t have to actually prove any link to crimes, just the fact you lied is enough).

Also do NOT use any school resources for mental health.. since ANYTHING out of the norm will be chalked up to that.
 
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M&L

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A very polite but firm F....... NO to that.

Also disagree w/ asking upper classmen since that will prompt them to ask why you’re asking.

Don’t write in N/A if you can get away with it, since leaving it blank can be chalked up to a “mistake” by you but stating N/A is lying and can be used as an “unprofessional” tag on you. (just like when gov forms ask you if you plan to overthrow the gov or are a member of a terrorist org... no one will say yes but if they catch you lying, they don’t have to actually prove any link to crimes, just the fact you lied is enough).

Also do NOT use any school resources for mental health.. since ANYTHING out of the norm will be chalked up to that.
Yeah I’d say grieving counseling and perhaps uncomplicated insomnia is fine , but otherwise I kind of see your point
 

ciestar

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Yeah I’d say grieving counseling and perhaps uncomplicated insomnia is fine , but otherwise I kind of see your point
Even that can be held against you. My HPSP friend mentioned that to me before. Idk how true that is, but she was genuinely concerned about that for thinking about using counseling just for stress.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't disclose ****. I'd ask upperclassman first to see, then I might ask admin about what they're doing with this data. You can even mention that your friends at other schools don't disclose this.

This is sketchy. These schools increasingly are looking for leverage against their students and like others have mentioned, they can use it against you. Even a kid in my first year class was withheld from running for elected office for school government during first year because of his mental health illness, that's literally what the school cited. They of course mentioned that they want him to be able to focus and succeed in school and academics and that should be priority 1. Which was a nice way to say, your anxiety disorder is a problem and you can't run for class president because of it.

If you have learning disabilities, sure. Because disclosing that could be used to get you more time to take exams, taking them in separate rooms, etc. But if you have a history of substance abuse, anxiety disorders or mood disorders, or psychotic disorders, or even take any psychiatric medicine, I'd leave it blank.

I can't think of a reason why they need to know that.

Edit: and ALWAYS visit the doctors that aren't associated with the school, if at all possible.
 
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datboi_58

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I sympathize with OP but I don’t understand the reaction on here towards medical schools asking for the status of a student’s mental health as opposed to say vaccinations? I understand there may be some policies that are overly harsh and punitive towards certain mental health conditions and those should be changed accordingly but overall, if you’re going to treat patients, you need to have good mental health just like you need to be vaccinated.

Forgive me, but am I missing something?
 
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Espressso

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I sympathize with OP but I don’t understand the reaction on here towards medical schools asking for the status of a student’s mental health as opposed to say vaccinations? I understand there may be some policies that are overly harsh and punitive towards certain mental health conditions and those should be changed accordingly but overall, if you’re going to treat patients, you need to have good mental health just like you need to be vaccinated.

Forgive me, but am I missing something?

You're not missing anything, but you're glossing over the fact that schools routinely use these health things against students. And the vaccines is a poor comparison. Schools ask for vaccine verification because they don't want their student to be a vector for measles while rotating in hospitals or on campus. Schools aren't wondering about your mood stabilizer medicine because you might be a vector for bipolar disorder. They're wondering that to have a evidence if you ever slip up.

Yes we want doctors to "have good mental health" but during school, when you're shackled to the program for your four years, those conditions can be and often are used against you.
 
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sunshinefl

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I sympathize with OP but I don’t understand the reaction on here towards medical schools asking for the status of a student’s mental health as opposed to say vaccinations? I understand there may be some policies that are overly harsh and punitive towards certain mental health conditions and those should be changed accordingly but overall, if you’re going to treat patients, you need to have good mental health just like you need to be vaccinated.

Forgive me, but am I missing something?
For my school, we had to have a physician physical in regards to the technical standards before we started. Medical conditions and medications were disclosed to the physician (of your choice) as part of the process. But all the school got out of it was a form blinded to all the private medical information, but affirming meeting the technical standards. That is a more appropriate approach.
 
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