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Medical school in UK (UK citizen)

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grahambranchno9

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Hey all,

I'm a senior in college with a 3.65 and am hoping to score 35 on the MCAT (fingers crossed!). I'm a business major, with decent extracurriculars and a couple of publications in the sciences. I'm also citizen of the UK, and spent the first 11 years of my life there. When I start applying next year, I want to apply to some UK schools as well as US schools. How competitive would I be to somewhere like Oxford or Cambridge, and how do these schools differ in how they assess candidates? Would the program be 5 years or 4 years? Is the residency process the same as in the US? Where can I find out more about it all?

Thanks
 

Scottish Chap

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Hey all,

I'm a senior in college with a 3.65 and am hoping to score 35 on the MCAT (fingers crossed!). I'm a business major, with decent extracurriculars and a couple of publications in the sciences. I'm also citizen of the UK, and spent the first 11 years of my life there. When I start applying next year, I want to apply to some UK schools as well as US schools. How competitive would I be to somewhere like Oxford or Cambridge, and how do these schools differ in how they assess candidates? Would the program be 5 years or 4 years? Is the residency process the same as in the US? Where can I find out more about it all?

Thanks
Both Oxford and Cambridge 'hold' places for international students. As a British citizen with an American undergraduate degree, you would not be the first to apply to either program. However, Oxford requires a rigorous science degree for the 4-year accelerated medical course, so you'd probably not be eligible. I'm not sure about Cambridge, but I'd urge you to contact them. Nothing beats hearing information first-hand.

With a GPA >3.6, you should be competitive in the U.S. With a U.S. degree-especially non-science-it varies for British medical schools. Also keep in mind that British schools (other than Edinburgh) don't care about the MCAT. Oxford and Cambridge have their own entrance exam that you have to score well on to secure an interview. Also, predicting an MCAT score is very different from reality; make sure that you are well-prepared and not over-confident. I know too many people with excellent GPAs who tanked this exam because they thought it looked easy.

The British medical residency system is quite different from the U.S. It is both more lengthy, and more general early on. As a British citizen, you'd be eligible to do all your training there (as a foreign national, you would not). Keep in mind that you would have to re-do your residency training in the U.S. and you would have to take the USMLE Part 1, 2, and 3 if you want to move back to the U.S.

Do you have a green card? If not, that will be an issue for American medical schools.

I hope that helps, and good luck.
 

!PsyChirurgus!

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Just to quickly add:

Cambridge holds 22 places for International Medical applicants whilst Oxford only have 6 places for International Medical Applicants.
 

jellofrice

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I don't know too much, but I think since you haven't taken A levels you would be seen as an international student. With A levels they expect AAA and with the ACTs they expect roughly above 31 or even more. To get into both schools you are required to take a BMAT which you can find practise papers for on a website. Good luck.

But if you wanted to know Cambridge is third in the table for medical degrees, and Oxford is even further down. You can apply for either UCL which is first place or Birmingham which I think is second place.
 

khl31

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As far as i know, there is a nationally/centrally mandated 7% cap on the number of internationals on any given medical course across the country. however, i must admit that i applied some time ago and the numbers might have changed. judging from the number of internationals that i see in the years below nowadays, i can only guess that the quota has either remained the same or gone up. I haven't the foggiest clue whether the OP would be counted as international or not, but I imagine if someone wants you bad enough, they'll find a slot on some quota or other.

From the sounds of the OP's credentials, I'd venture that he/she would end up with an interview offer (assuming he/she applied for the right course, more on that later). It then depends on performance at the interview, which can be surprisingly discerning. (surprising even in light of the fact one expects it to be discerning)

Courses: Both Cambs and Oxford do a 4 year Graduate Entry Programme (GEP) course. Internationals, think twice. On top of that, many of these guys have postgraduate degrees - of the 20 or so a year on the Cambs GEP, between 15-20% (3 or 4 a year) enter the course already "Dr" i.e. PhD. I can only imagine a number of the others have masters or equivalents...

Cambs also does an "affiliated" course for people with undergrad degrees already and not on the GEP, which is 5 years instead of the usual 6, missing out the intercalated 3rd year of the full length course. No idea if Oxford has an equivalent. No idea as to number of admissions.

Both unis also have the bog standard 6 year course - 2 years preclinical, 1 year intercalated, 3 years clinical. UK students generally enter straight after 6th form/high school after A levels, again generally with AAA(A). Grades and ability (and personality!) of people accepted vary *slightly* depending on which college you apply to.

Whilst you hear of AAB entries once in a while, and colleges have been known to give out EE conditional offers (i.e. 2 E's at A levels all you need to get in), don't expect to be these exceptions - they are exceedingly rare. And there is always the myth/urban legend of a kid that secured an EE offer, stopped studying, indeed got his 2 E's, got in, and got a proper telling -off on his first day. (The legend goes on to expound on the misery college heaped on him until he performed :oops:)

As for the American system, I leave it to others better informed...

Endpoint: Average American attending = early 30s. Average UK consultant = mid to late 30s. Degree of skill/knowledge/autonomy/recompense = EXTREMELY VARIABLE, considerable overlap! British doctors tend to hold the view that American doctors are more narrow and specialized, and know less general medicine than their UK counterparts. Whether this is true or not, I have no experience, and would not care to comment.

But if you did the unimaginable and tried to do both systems somehow, imagine the alphabet soup after your name...:D
 

soleluna

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I am currently in a 6 year medicine and surgery course in Italy. I then will have to do a specialty training (for example anesthesiology, pediatrics, gastroenterology..), and I wanted to do it in the UK.
Here while doing the specialization (postgraduate course) we get paid each month, but have to pay the annual school fee too. Does it work in the same way in the UK?
How long do the postgraduate courses last? (Here it depends, but the shortest is 4 years and the longest is 6)
 
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