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Medicine Classics

Discussion in 'Internal Medicine and IM Subspecialties' started by HarryGary, Aug 8, 2011.

  1. HarryGary

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    Off the recommendation of one of our MICU attendings, I just read Cope's Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen, a thin little book that gives a detailed overview of how to approach any patient with belly pain. Having read it, I can see why it's considered a medicine classic (even though it's written for surgeons). Highly informative and concise.

    Anyone know of any other books they'd consider a classic or just a great read on a medical topic?

    (Sorry, we can go back to asking if people with 250 steps have a shot at a bunch of medicine programs later).
     
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  3. Bike on a Trek

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    Plum and Posner, Diagnosis of Stupor and Coma
     
  4. drfunktacular

    drfunktacular ANA ≠ SLE
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    Slightly different but similarly satisfying is Sapira's Art and Science of Bedside Diagnosis

    For EKG Marriott's Practical Electrocardiography is authoritative (up until the 8th edition, which I believe is the last one he wrote solo)
     
  5. Bike on a Trek

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    Marriott's meets my definition of a classic that requires it to be around for a long time. But, Dubin's programmed text is right with Marriott's as a basic learning tool.

    Sapira's is a bit quirky and hasn't been around long enough to be a classic (despite it's style that suggests it belongs in the category). For physical examination texts, the classic would be DeGowin's and DeGowin's that has been around forever with Bates being the more recent entry.
     
  6. HarryGary

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    Read the Amazon reviews for Sapira and picked it up anyway.

    I remember the neurology residents talking about Plum's book way back in med school. Will pick that one up eventually, too.

    Here's a list we can add to now

    1. Cope's "Early Diagnosis of the Acute Abdomen"
    2. Plum "Diagnosis of stupor and coma"
    3. Marriot "Practical Electrocardiology"
    4. +/- Dubin "Rapid interpretation of ECGs"
    5. +/- Sapira "Art and science of bedside diagnosis"

    Any thoughts on one for general radiology?
     
  7. drfunktacular

    drfunktacular ANA ≠ SLE
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    General radiology might be a bit broad for a reasonably concise volume; regarding the chest X-ray, however, there is Felson's Principles of Chest Roentgenology. I think it should go on the list.
     
  8. inspirationmd

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    House of God...every med student should be required to read it. Still relevant even after 30 years...
     
  9. HarryGary

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    House of God disappointed me, but I agree it should be on this list.

    Gawande's Complications and Better are excellent. Checklist Manifesto is ok.

    Emperor of Maladies by Mukherjee is also great.
     
  10. witchbaby

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    I remember hearing this several times when I was a medical student, and finally picked up the book and read it. I thought it was disgusting and I would never be that jaded. I couldn't figure out why anyone would recommend it.

    I started reading it again last summer after finishing residency. Much of the book resonated. I'm not sure whether I should be depressed because I'm now a jaded, burt-out doctor in the old school, or happy that I now understand why it's a classic. . .

    (For the record, I may be jaded, I am not burn-out, but I do have a different perspective after residency, one which I like to think of as 'realism' and one which aligns more with House Of God than my medical school perspective did.)

    So if you're a med student (or a shiny new optimistic intern) reading this thread - read House of God now if you want a mirror on your own changes through medical school and residency. It's a crazy fun-house mirror though, and you might not like your reflection. Read it after at least a year of residency if you just want to say you've read and enjoyed a medicine classic.
     

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