nicko18

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I'm trying to figure out a bit more with regards to migraines with associated aura's.

One example i came across was a lady who had the zig zag visual patterns, tingling and weakness of the left arm and hand, as well as getting lost driving a familiar route home. Then left sided head pain always followed.

I've read some theories stating that a spasming of blood vessels on one side of the cerebrum can cause these signs, but there's one thing i cant understand. Certainly if a reduced blood flow to the right hemisphere causes the neurologic signs, why does the subsequent increased flow and stretch cause head pain on the same side as the neurologic signs?
 

cadoc

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nicko18 said:
I'm trying to figure out a bit more with regards to migraines with associated aura's.

One example i came across was a lady who had the zig zag visual patterns, tingling and weakness of the left arm and hand, as well as getting lost driving a familiar route home. Then left sided head pain always followed.

I've read some theories stating that a spasming of blood vessels on one side of the cerebrum can cause these signs, but there's one thing i cant understand. Certainly if a reduced blood flow to the right hemisphere causes the neurologic signs, why does the subsequent increased flow and stretch cause head pain on the same side as the neurologic signs?

Nick018,

While the theory of decreased blood flow followed by vasodilation is still widely held, it is far from the whole story when it comes to migraine etiology. There are some out there who have demonstrated increased neuronal activity (seizure like) during the aura. Basically, migraine isn't straightforward. A person can develop almost any neurologic symptom prior to developing the headache (sometimes they don't even get the headache--which makes diagnosis troublesome).