military residency???

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by barb, Jun 17, 2002.

  1. barb

    barb Senior Member

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    I'm considering do HPSP and was wondering how the residencies are in terms of hours, work load, resident treatment, etc. compared to civilian residencies? Are they roughly the same?
     
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  3. Airborne

    Airborne Senior Member

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    Hey Barb:

    The decision to take an HPSP scholarship is a big one - and there are other factors one should consider, aside from how a military residency compares with the civilian world.

    I was in the Army for four years, prior to my undergraduate degree (Hence my username!), and had considered an HPSP scholarship. While I thoroughly enjoyed my experiences, I was young, single and otherwise unattached. Thus, the military was a great way to explore new experiences, as well as finance an education (the GI Bill) - I would not trade those four years of my life, and seem to enjoy them even more now since I am a bit removed! :)

    However, my understanding of the HPSP is one would owe 4 years (for 4 years of scholarhsip) POST residency - so If you decide on FM, that would mean you would owe 7 years, and G-Surg, 9-years to the man!

    I was 18-22 in the service - considering a person who goes "straight through",the expected age out of med school is 26 and 7 to 9 years after that (maybe more...) owed to the services would mean one would be up to 35 years old before you are free and clear - still plenty of time for a career free of the forces!!!

    Unfortunately, the problem is that many people would choose to start a significant relationship (and family!) well before that - The things they don't tell you are there are plenty of "dependent restricted tours" where your partner and children are prohibited from moving with you, and you'd be required to spend 1+ years apart. In addition, temporary duty (TDY) and other deployments often challenge even the most stable relationships.

    I remember that as I was getting my ETS (exit the service) physical, I ask the Doc what he thought - he gave clear advice to think clearly of the sacrifices one would have to make before basising my decision solely upon financial liability...

    In light of such, I choose not to attempt an HPSP scholarship. I realize they are very competitive, and I salute (can I still do that?) those who are both officer and physician. However, one would gather that lifestyle is important to you (hence, the worries about such issues in a military residency) and I would suggest you consider all options...

    Incidentially, you would be surprized about how many post-residency jobs in the civilian world offer to repay student loans as an incentive to attract physicians - take a look at all opportunities!

    Kind regards,

    Airborne
     
  4. barb

    barb Senior Member

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    Thank you so much for all the info Airborne! I'm really starting to re-think the whole HPSP thing. The problem is, I really want to do surgery, and I'm already 27. I don't have any kids yet, but I'm hoping to someday and the thought of having to leave them for a year at a time is just heartwrenching. I'm already worried that I'll be too old to do surgery because of the kid factor. I guess I really didn't think the rest through. Thanks again for your words of wisdom. BTW, when did you get your wings? I was in Delta Company, summer of 1995.
     
  5. hosskp1

    hosskp1 Senior Member

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    I am in the Army HPSP righ now-- I really love it. However you need to listen to Airborne's advice carefully. I want to be an orthopod and they have really great programs so I am gunning for one of those spots. I am single and am willing to deploy-- if needed. I would love to go to jump school as well- if given the opportunity. Being an officer in the military sets me apart from my buddies and school mates. I have talked to numerous military doctors and the impression I get is that you have to be willing to be flexible and a bit hardcore to do well. Think really hard-- it is a big step.

    HOO-AH and good luck
     
  6. Airborne

    Airborne Senior Member

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    Barb:

    I was in Delta company, too. However, my time in Airborne School at Ft. Benning was early '92, so its been awhile! Though I returned intermittently for more advanced training...

    Good to hear that you are thinking it through - I found the military a wonderful experience, but I also understand that it takes a lot of commitment and sacrifice, not only from yourself, but from also from all those around you.

    Keep us informed of your decision.

    Airborne
     

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