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Military Scholarship?

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by virginiabeach, Dec 8, 2005.

  1. virginiabeach

    virginiabeach Member
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    I was wondering if anyone in the network is considering or already participating in the HPSP in the Navy, Army, or Air Force. I was thinking of partaking in the scholarship to save myself from debt. I know after 4 years you are required to serve 4 years active duty and then 4 years of inactive reserve. Let me know if you guys think this is a good idea. Full tuition, books, and fees as well as a monthly stipend is pretty tempting.
     
  2. klfb80

    klfb80 Senior Member
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    I had a good friend that was prior service take the scholarship. For him it was awsome thay paid for tuition & fees & books, plus around 1100 amonth in stipends. He graduated and practiced as a dentist in the army for around five years. He then applied for a posotion in an orthdontics school through the army. In other words the army allocates positions for ortho, endo, perio in schools around the country because they need these specialties. He got the spot at Louisville anthe army paid the addtional $100,000 for this program. So while he was in Ortho school he lived as a civilian for two years. He also got paid as a liutentant colonel (around 100,000 a year) while he was in the orth program. After ortho he only owed two more years. Fortunatley for him he had enough years in to retire. If you can handle an army lifestyle for a few years do it. You'll be an officer anyway. It's a pretty good deal. Think about it 30 years woth of loan repayment or 4 years of military service. I did eight years in aviation so you could do these four years standing on your head. Oh yeah and pick the airforce, it has the highest standard of living.
     
  3. americanpierg

    americanpierg Senior Member
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    its bascially a gamble from what i hear... maybe if bush hints a draft ill apply since im going to be drafted anyways, but personally i think ull end up dead even financially going down either route after all is said and done. Going with the scholarship would just mean less debt haunting u for the first few years, but then again the thought of war is scarier for me.
     
  4. joebucks

    joebucks Senior Member
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    I just had my physical on wed., got accepted to my #1 and my application is complete, I'm just waiting for the Air Force board to select. I went and visited Wright Patt AFB with my recruiter and I was able to tour the dental clinics. If I were you I would do some more research on the scholarship that you are going for and talk to a recruiter. BUT, the recruiter's job is to get you to apply so take that with a grain of salt. Personally I wouldn't do the scholarship if it was just for the money. You WILL feel like you are getting ripped off in the end, especially if you go to a in-state school, if you souly do it for the cash. Good luck and you can PM me if you have any questions.
    Joe
     
  5. BigRedDentist

    BigRedDentist Senior Member
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    I have taken my physical, got accepted to school, but I am still hesitant about applying. It is a huge decision and I am not really sure how the whole specialization thing works since they don't have a six year OMS program in the military.
     
  6. Peter North

    Peter North Member
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    I was considering doing the military route until I found out that if you want to specialize you can and will..BUT then you owe the same number of years you specialize in ADDITION to the 4 years from dental school. From what people have told me, at that point, your a military dentist for life, its just not practical to go civilian that late in the game once you've fulfilled your requirements. You won't have enough practicing years left to establish a thriving practice.
     
  7. ARguy

    ARguy Member
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    That's the stupidest thing I've ever heard. Do 4 years in the military, then do three years to become an orthodontist, then give them three years back. What is that? Like ten years? Not to mention you're making 100k per year while you're becoming an ortho. So, after ten years gaining all of that valuable experience you can leave the military if you'd like and make the average salary of 300k per year or you can stay ten more, retire and then go make the cash. So, if you retire you're what? 47 years old? If you just stay for the ten you're only 37? It's not practical to go civilian at that point? Wow, you must be planning on retiring when you're what? 30?
     
  8. -OB-

    -OB- Member
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    I worked with a dentist who went to Tufts and joined the airforce. He served for about 15 years and now he is the head of a dental clinic and runs a residency program. He seems miserable. He also has also said that he wishes he had his own private practice. I wouldn't want to be like him 30 years from now.
     
  9. Peter North

    Peter North Member
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    This is just what i've heard don't cry to me about. Make your own decisions... genius
     
  10. ARguy

    ARguy Member
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    Hmm, I guess since it's what you've heard then it's OK to spread BS. I mean that makes perfect sense. It does to me anyway, being that I'm a genius and all.
     
  11. klfb80

    klfb80 Senior Member
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    I was just accepted to Class 2010. I have already spent 8 yrs in the Army and, some good yrs and some not so good. Overall OK. I was in aviation. Being a dentist in the Army is a whole different world, fairly easy in comparison to other jobs. Your not on the front lines or anything. The military is definitley not a place for everyone. It's a personal decision. If your scared it's not for you (perter north), stay home.
     
  12. jim wilson

    jim wilson New Member

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    Accepted to my first choice. Debt free in 4 years verses 30 years; I'm definitedly considering the military. If you're going to a private school it may be worth it; state school not a chance should it be considered. However, the military is not for most people. I already have spent 4 years in the Army and enjoyed it as a pilot. I can do 4 more years playing with teeth standing on my head.
     
  13. SunnyDay

    SunnyDay Member
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    You must be pretty talented to be able to play with teeth and stand on your heard at the same time!
     
  14. jim wilson

    jim wilson New Member

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    Thank You. You have the ability to spot talent!
     
  15. DentalNerd

    DentalNerd Senior Member
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    Do Military Scholarships cover the entire cost of tuition and fees regardless of cost? For example, Case Western is more expensive than most private schools. Will the military cover the entire cost? Also, what about state schools? Will they cover out-of-state tuition all four years? Obviously, it's much less expensive to cover the cost of resident vs. non-resident tuition. I'm curious if this plays a role in offering scholarships.

    Thanks.
     
  16. Unemployed

    Unemployed Senior Member
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    UOP and Air Force scholarship. Good idea?
     
  17. rinse-n-spit

    rinse-n-spit Junior Member
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    I think that the military deal is good for some. But I do not think it is that great of a deal. At some point in the dental career everybody is going to go into debt e.g. school, practice, etc. Sure the military can help avoid the school debt, but if you ever want to set up your own practice after the 4 or 10 years given to the military you are going to go into debt. Plus you will have lost time establishing a practice by going into the military and therefore will spend more time than the average professional establishing a good clientele.
    Also debt doesn't have to take 30 years to pay off. Too many people think that once we are out of school we can begin living a life style that is completely out of their league. The ortho that has mentored me will be out of debt (school,practice,house) within 8 years of starting school. Just be smart about how much you barrow and what you can buy while in debt.
     
  18. ARguy

    ARguy Member
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    From what the recruiter told me, the scholarship will pay for any school, in-state or out-of-state. They cover all required expenses for four years plus pay you a monthly stipend of $1279. For example, I got into two schools, one costs 190k for the four years and another costs substantially less. If I take the more expensive route, they'll cover the whole thing and end up paying me around 60k in stipend money. That's like getting 250k interest free. If you figure that you're completely out of debt in four years and ready to go start your own practice with more and better skills than the average practitioner with the same amount of time under his/her belt, it's not that bad a deal. I doubt that at say 30 years old it's too late too go out on your own or be able to develop a profitable business. I personally know dentists that are in their 60's and 70's that are still practicing, some are former military, and they're doing pretty darn good financially. So, the choice comes down to this, do you want to give something back to your country or not? If not, then go your own route. If you do, then you'll benefit yourself as well as the men and women in uniform that you provide an important service to.
     
  19. Peter North

    Peter North Member
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    Scared..got me there..thats it. Seeing that it takes a tremendous amount of courage to be an army dentist and all.
     
  20. Peter North

    Peter North Member
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    Its BS if you want to believe its BS. If you subscribe to being committed to the army for 10+ years it makes perfect sense for you (if u want to specialize). I personally don't like the idea of being owned by somebody for that amount of time nor would i like to try to establish a civilian life style that late in my life. Once again, this was a concern expressed to me from a dentist who had actually gone through with the ordeal, but maybe he's in the business of creating BS.
     
  21. tissy

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    I was a dental assistant in the USAF for 6 years and worked with more than 60 dentist. Most of them did the HPSP and had their school paid for. If I were you, I would do it. You have a better chance to specialize and they'll pay for that to. It's a relax environment and you get to travel. You don't go to war if that's what's on your mind. If you do, you must be in charge of some kind of program or something. If you want to know more, I have first hand experience working with many of the dentist who did the scholarship and served. It's an awesome experience!! I'm going to do it if I get accepted to dental school...I want to go to Italy next..I traveled and lived almost all over asia as a dental assistant.

     
  22. virginiabeach

    virginiabeach Member
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    I have a few questions that I am sure will benefit everyone interested in the HPSP. When you were in the air force, how often did they move the dentists around from place to place? Were you given an option as to which place you wanted to go, and if so, did you always get your first choice? Were the clinics up to date in terms of the instruments and supplies? Was the clinic ever short of supplies? How many dentists were there at each clinic? Roughly how many patients did each dentist see per day and what were your hours? Could you please answer these and throw in any other info you would like to share.
    Thanks
     
  23. HermeytheElf

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    I think one point you all seem to have missed so far is that even though the army is going to pay for all your dental school costs, you will be 8 years behind on building your practice when you do get out. It takes alot of time to build up a good patient base and if you don't start until you're in your mid-30s, its going to be tough to be able to put away enough to retire by the time you're 60. In my opinion, if you're going to do the armed forces scholarship, plan on putting in your 20 years and getting your pension. If you are just doing it to get out of dental school debt, then you should seriously reconsider because its probably not worth it in the long run.
     
  24. tissy

    U.S. Public Health Service 10+ Year Member

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    When a dentist is stationed at a base, it depends how long they station you there for. Usually you get your first choice of where you want to live but have to choose what's available which are usually good places. You can choose to live overseas or in the US. You'll probably select 3 out 10-15 places depends where they have vacant spots at. I've worked at 6 dental clinics in the air force. I would have to say it depends what base you go to. It's cool because if you get a base with people who run the clinic right you have lots of money to spend and will probably get the newest technology out there in dentistry. You have a supply department and they put all orders that you want. Pretty much you don't worry about your instruments or supplies because the assistant that works with you or assigned to you will have all that ready for you. The size of dental clinics vary depending again which base you go to. I worked at Lackland Airfroce base in san antonio at it is a HUGE dental clinic. We had advanced general dentistry, ortho department with more that 5 orthdo., endo, pros, preventive dentistry, and rotational oral surgery. I guess pretty much everything with more that 30 dentist working in one clinic and maybe 20 at the other on the same base. Also, I was stationed in Okinawa Japan at the was again a huge dental clinic. My recent base was Vandenberg AFB which was alot smaller. There were only around 12 dentist there but everything was great. They had extra money at times so the dentist got to order alot of goodies. Your hours are usually 8 hour days with seeing a patient every hour depending on the procedure. Most bases you get an hour and half lunch because they put your fitness into it. There's alot to say about the Air Force but this pretty much answers your questions. There are however long days certain days out of the month. Depedning whats going on in the world. For instance, when the war first started, we worked maybe a couple of hours overtime for a couple of weeks straight. Your priority as a dentist in the military is making sure every person in the military is ready for war. So no matter what time it is you have to be ready to be called in if they need you to make a decision on someones oral health.
    Pretty much your responsible for seeing your patients and a little bit of politics...everything else is taken care of for you..housing, food, and a bonus in your check for being a dentist..

    sorry for my spelling...in a rush..finals weekhttp://forums.studentdoctor.net/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=3177948#
    luckie
     
  25. tissy

    U.S. Public Health Service 10+ Year Member

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    Air Force is 3-4 years and great thing about it is you network with alot of people. http://forums.studentdoctor.net/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=3178006#
    Wink

     
  26. klfb80

    klfb80 Senior Member
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    No but it sound like your just scared to put on the unifrom and do something honorable. I also know a few Army dentists that don't think you'd say that to because they'd ball you up little man.
     
  27. klfb80

    klfb80 Senior Member
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    Now thats a little more accurate. I don't like the idea of anyone owning me for that amount of time either. But if your a young, lets say 25 or 26 when you grad. DS. and specialization was not on your mind then then 4 years of repayment is not that bad.
     
  28. klfb80

    klfb80 Senior Member
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    Thats if you stay for eight. The Scholarship to pay for dental school is a one-for-one exchange. You would only owe 4 years.
     
  29. hockeydentist

    hockeydentist 1K Member
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    If you get the army scholarship does the army train you to be a dentist in the army. Reason I ask, is that one of the military branch(will not disclose the name) warned me about signing with the army. Recruiters words were " you might have all this training but be assigned to do something else once you're active". I would hate to go to dental school for 4 years to end up wasting skills learned in school.

    Part of me was like this guy is feeding me a line of BS. I don't want to spread BS, but who can you ask to find out.

    HD
     
  30. tissy

    U.S. Public Health Service 10+ Year Member

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    I would say that Air Force is the way because they are pretty much straight forward with you. Being experience in the dental field in the military, I'll tell you right now DON'T do army. Please listen to me because I know what I'm telling you....unless you are hard core and like to put up with alot of BS.

    My views...hope they help.

     
  31. korndoctor

    korndoctor Member
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    could you clarify please? what type of bs do you have to put up with in the army? i'm interested in either army or airforce, but i'm not sure which scholarship is best for me. the recruiters only feed me with pompous statements to convince me to join.
     
  32. tissy

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    Okay, I want to appoligize for posting such negative things about the army. I was a dental assistant in the air force for 6 years and presently an assistant in the reserves. There are times when we deploy with other dental folks in other branches so from experience I could tell you that you would be better off in the air force. It's an awesome deal...not only are you serving your country and getting your school paid off but you will have opportunities to travel. If you don't want loans..I don't see how anyone passes up a deal like this.
    Also, if you want to specialize, it's an awesome way to get your foot in the door. I've work with many dentist who get accepted to the (lots) endo, (somewhat lots) peds, (2 a year i believe) ortho, general residence programs..i mean the opportunities are waiting if you just grab it. I was stationed at Lackland Air Force Base for a year and worked in the junior general dental residence and they have an awesome staff teaching. During my stay, I worked with the ortho, endo, oral surgery, and peds residence too. All the students except the general dental residence loved it. The general dental residence had it pretty tough meaning the staff was hard on them on how they did there procedures...they pretty much had to be perfect in any cases they had. But let me tell, they are by far great advance general dentist now.
    My advice is to you...grab the opportunities that are awaiting for you!! Trust me..just pm me if you have any questions..
     
  33. bloodygums

    bloodygums Member
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    I was planning on applying for the Air Force scholarship, but I changed my mind at the last minute. One of the main reasons that I decided not to apply was because I think I would like to specialize in OMFS. I've never heard about the airforce or any other branch of the military having anything to do with this specialty. At one of my interviews, the finiacial aid person talked me out of doing the schalorship. She said that the military commitment often gets in the way of people's post graduate plans, and you shouldn't do it unless you really want to join the military just for the sake of joining the military. I also got a vauge impression from my recruiter that the military (any branch) is like joining one of those CD of the month clubs where they give you a great deal up front with some back end commitments that you're never able to escape. For example, in an emergency they can extend your 4 years to 8. I don't like nebulous terms like "emergency" when I'm signing a contract. There was also some stuff about required time in the reserve. If you get out and start a practice can they just call you whenever they like and make you drop your private practice? If anybody has insight to any part of this long rambling set of questions, I would appreciate it.
     
  34. starvinstudent

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    I think it would be foolish to join the military to pay off such a small loan.

    Why risk your life and be told where to go and how long to work for 4-8 years for a 150,000 loan.

    Thats not even a valid option.
     
  35. makushin

    makushin Member
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  36. tissy

    U.S. Public Health Service 10+ Year Member

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    I agree 100% with you!! Misinformation is in the minds of most about jobs in the military. It was the best experience and still is in my life. If you met me in person, I don't think people would believe that im in the military.
     
  37. starvinstudent

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    actually, the only funniness is your last post.

    When you enlist in the military to pay off graduate school they can legally turn your 4 year committment into 8 years. they can make you work whatever hours they choose. they determie the number of patients you have not you.

    they own you. also, if you start your enlistment in a time of war they can legally keep you indefinately. How does that sound??? Is that funny to you?

    Also, as far as danger, hows this, what if your in the navy and stationed on a carrier that is attacked??? Your first obligation as a member of the military is not that of medical personnel but to defend your country. You will receive combat training and you will learn to defend yourself and others. Wonder why they do that? Thats because you can easily be placed in a dangerous position and have to fight.

    Also, ever hear of all these men and women dieing in Irag in the convoys? They include medical personnel. you dont think you get there and never have to move positions do you? No you have to travel in hostile territories and your life is at risk.

    If you think this is funny still then grow up. ITS CLEARLY NOT WORTH THE RISK.
     
  38. tissy

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    One out of a million dentist(if that) that even go to Iraq...speaking from the airforce perspective..not sure about the navy, army, or marines
     
  39. starvinstudent

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    What???

    First of all. There are lots of dentists over there. 2nd of all. There are not 1 million dentists in the world.

    3rd of all, your way off base here.

    You need to go think about this before you post cause it makes you look really idiotic.
     
  40. coolslugs

    coolslugs Senior Member
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    When was the last time an aircraft carrier is attacked...WWII? Yes, when you join the military, you are a soldier first then anything else. You will receive different amounts of combat training (depending on service branch), but overall not that much for health professionals.

    Yes, I have heard of men and women dying in Iraq in the convoys. These casualties include medics (enlisted men and women), but I have never heard of physicians (officers) or dentists dying in action.

    By the way, there are people that are willing to take the risk and make sacrafices...it's what makes this country great!
     
  41. tissy

    U.S. Public Health Service 10+ Year Member

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    First of all..not many airforce dentist are over there

    Second of all..I was being sarcastic about a million :laugh: get it..LOL

    Third of all..I keep in contact with most of the dentist I've worked with in the AF so I'm telling you from their perspective...and I've worked with around 50 or so..I usually call most of the clinics I worked at (such as Korea and Japan, Germany) and talk to a few of them which they update me on alot of things such as deployments..so I wouldn't really call myself an idiot for knowing facts from a firsthand source..

    Maybe you should chill out and go have a beer or something..I'll buy ;)
     
  42. starvinstudent

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    sounds good to me.
     
  43. lindandy

    lindandy I like soup!!!
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    Free beer?
     
  44. tissy

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    Yup...free beer at my moms house :laugh:
     
  45. tissy

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    Yup...free beer at my moms house or your moms j/k :laugh:
     
  46. OrinScrivello

    OrinScrivello I'll be a success!
    5+ Year Member

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    This is just plain contradictory. An n year commitment is just that. There is nothing legal about turning n into 2n. I suspect you are under the influence of anecdotes from some idiot who didn't read his enlistment contract and tries to blame his mistake on the military.

    HAHAHAHAHA! <wrong>

    How many U.S. military chaplains have been forced to put down their bibles and shoot people? Ummmm, let me check......hmmm.....I think it might be.... ZERO! Because they are NOT soldiers first, they are professionals who are serving the military. Just like physicians, dentists, and lawyers. The legal status of these professional officers is very different from combatants, all the way to international law and the Geneva Convention. As a military dentist/lawyer/chaplain you do not receive the same military training as any combat arms personnel. You are expected, in times of war and peace, to perform your professional function with excellence. The exact location where you perform this function may indeed be more dangerous than your average private practice, but if you don't like the excitement, then don't sign up. Dentists are second only to lawyers as being in the lowest-risk locations. Our modern military has effective medical evacuation capabilities, and our warzones are so small, that dental cases can be easily extracted (pun intended) to a safe clinic location.
     
  47. pretzeldude66

    10+ Year Member

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    First of all, please be aware of throwing around terms - officers do not "enlist." Through the HPSP, you are undergoing direct commissioning. When you sign on that fear-inducing black line and take your oath with the recruiter, you become an officer in the United States Military.
    Second, I went to Air Force COT this summer before my first year of dental school. I received no weapons training, no combat training, and spent 2 nights in an air conditioned tent on a deployment exercise - during which we were forced to return to the tents each time the temperature surpassed 90 degrees. When I graduate from dental school, I will dust off my uniform, put it on, and start practicing dentistry. There will be no extra military-style training. Sounds like a really effective combatant, huh? With the military, there is always the descrete possibility of ANYTHING. This much is true, but by the time they would be lining dentists up on the front lines, they would also be drafting every other fit person from the free world to fight too. They are spending at least $300,000 dollars on me over these four years. Why would they throw that training away so they could hand me a gun.
    I continue to be baffled by the negative posts by people who know NOTHING about the military. Is it that you have to have a comment and have to be right? Also, why would you discourage others from doing something outside the private sector? It means they won't be competing for your patients. Or are you now starting to realize that a dentist who went to a great school (because they were not afraid of the debt), attended a world-class military AEGD, learned discipline and respect might be a great commodity to the dental profession? Does that scare you that you missed out? If you know any real information rather than hearsay, please share, but since you are saying that dentists sign an enlistment contract, I would guess that you have no idea what you are talking about.
     
  48. coolslugs

    coolslugs Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

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    too bad ;) I know they do it at field training for AFROTC cadets, and there is actually a marksmanship ribbon if you are good at it.
     
  49. pretzeldude66

    10+ Year Member

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    I know, but medical staff are considered non-combatants. You know- the whole doing no harm thing.
     
  50. ARguy

    ARguy Member
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    Finally the voice of reason. Good post man. :thumbup:
     

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