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Military Scholarships

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by getlouped, Mar 7, 2007.

  1. getlouped

    getlouped Are we there yet?
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    Any information good or bad about them?
    Worth it? or Not?
    Army? or Navy? or Air Force?

    Anybody with any helpful information or opinions are welcome to respond!
     
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  3. keibee82

    keibee82 Blue_tooth...
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    I'm curious about this too. I got this info packet from Navy and it says that not only they gonna pay for my tuition, but they'd also cover the cost of setting up my own practice. Is this really true???
     
  4. shamrock2006

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    They are good programs. I've already committed to one. As far as giving you money to set up your own practice...I dont know how much truth there is to that unless I totally missed something because all of the programs (army, navy, and air force) are basically identical...unless you're talking about the FAP program..not the HPSP. They pay your tuition and all expenses required for an education (minus room and board), and you get a monthly stipend for 10.5 months plus 1.5 months of officers pay plus benefits. Do I think it's a good deal? Yes for many reasons..not just financial.. Others will tell you it's not a good idea. All depends on what you think really. Personally...i love the fact that you come out after ur 4 (or more yrs if you choose) of service with as much, if not more experience, than your civilian counterparts..as well as being debt free. Also, being able to serve your country as a medical officer, and flat out getting to see and do things that dentists in the civilian world wont be able to do. But I'm biased as you can tell. Bottom line, as I said, it's all about how you feel...I think it's a great idea and I can't wait to start, but others will tell you differently...it's totally subjective. Good luck!
     
  5. getlouped

    getlouped Are we there yet?
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    Just wondering which program you chose...And how did you make your decision. Right now I'm talking to both Army and Navy guys but I was trying to figure out the difference...I don't know much about the military in general anyway. Thanks for the info btw.
     
  6. crhoody12

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    I too am thinking about applying for one of the two programs. I arranged at my undergrad school to have both a army and navy officer to come speak in the next few weeks. However, from speaking to them both programs sound very similar. One difference I saw was where the Navy I believe will pay up to $180,000 the Army will pay full tuition (incase you decided to go to NYU or something). As stated above, while your in school you get a monthly stipend of approx $1300 and they pay for your books and your supplies. As far as setting up your own practice, I do not know much about that. I more know what the Army recruiter said when I talked to him in person. He said 6 months before graduation they give you a form of where you can/will be assigned, you pick 5, and hopefully go somewhere you want for the 4 years you owe back. You can live on the base which are pretty much self-contained with food stores, malls, etc or you can live off base and they give you a monthly stipend to help pay for rent/house mortgage. Also, if you want to specialize after your 4 years, the Navy and Army run a joint-type program where you learn your speciality and still only owe your 4 years (there is no add-on if you choose to do 4 years dental plus 2-3 years for ortho, oms, endo, etc; there is no accumulation of years) which I thought was a nice feature. I know also that coming out with a MD (medical degree) your rank is Major and make about $+40k a year so I would assume the same for dentist medical-type degree. I think the Army option seems a bit better but both sound about the same. If you have any questions, directed them below to the contacts I have at the Navy and Army

    HM1 (FMF) Charlotte Wilabay
    Navy Medical Officer Programs
    700 Robbins Ave, Bldg 2-D
    Philadelphia, PA 19111
    215-697-7100 x226
    215-669-1542 cell
    [email protected]

    [email protected]
    Abel D. Plasencio
    SFC, US Army Healthcare Recruiting
    2201 Route 38 East, Suite 105
    Cherry Hill, NJ 08002
    Office: (856) 414-0109
    Cell : (877) 228-1961
     
  7. shamrock2006

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    I chose to go Air Force...I never really looked in detail at the others b/c many of my family, both past and present, are part of the Air Force. The Air Force pays full tuition no matter where you go and a generous stipend. Keep in mind that selection is pretty competitive...just b/c you apply does not mean you will be selected by any means. As far as comparing all the programs and stuff, I pretty much think the only difference is the places you can be stationed...I'm pretty sure all of the benefits and such are the same. It's basically what you choose. I kept with the Air Force tradition and do not regret my decision. It is something that I would encourage you to at least check out and see if it is something you would be interested in. good luck.
     
  8. gatormichigan

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    The good thing about this is that they will pay for all four years of dental school for you... that is if you work for them four years. Bringing that up..... you are no longer your own boss for those four years.
    A good thing is that you get to pick 3 different places you are going to be stationed at but hope that one of those 3 places has an available spot otherwise they choose where you go.
    Although some people think that you have to wear the uniform, you dont.
    I wouldnt do it if I were you and if you are seriously considering it, talk to graduated dental students that are going through it and get their opinion not the Rep who is trying to get you to sign the contract. If you are worried about your loans, google "loan repayment programs" and there you can work for your state and they will pay a % of your loans. I think thats a better deal because you are not tied down to a contract by the US Gov.
     
  9. shamrock2006

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    This is probably the only time I would agree with a naysayer of the military scholarships. If money is your ONLY concern here..then do not choose the military route b/c you will be miserable. You do not make a ton of money as a military officer, you can make enough to live and live comfortably..but not as much as a dentist makes. Trust me, if you are considering military...make sure there are more drawing factors than money. However, I do disagree with those who claim that you are not tied down to contracts in civilian life, or that you dont have to report to people. In the military, you'll be working w/ some people who out rank you..and MANY who are below you..and after a while, there's a great chance you will be in charge if the clinic at your base. In civilian life, you also have to report to people..they are called student loan officers, and you are contractually obligated to them..and will be for well over a decade..maybe even 2 depening on where you go to school. But like I said, that is only if finances are the only factor for you here. I would make you sure you look at EVERY possible angle before making your decision....oh, and yes if you can..talk to those who work as dental officers, or those who are in/recently finished d-school and are in the military. I did that, and all the feedback was positive. I would most definitely suggest this.
     
  10. polf

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    if you were planning on specializing, the money you get from the military would be nowhere near civilian levels and not worth it. if you did general dentistry the military's probably be better off moneywise.
     
  11. lnsip9reg

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    Don't forget in addition to 4yrs of active duty, there is an additional 4yrs of inactive reserve. You are a civilian during this time, but if they're really short on dentists they can call you back. It's highly unlikely they'll do so, but.. they reserve that right.

    The cost in lost wages from your private practice at that point, in addition to any customer base you may be building is a pretty steep one.

    As the above posters have said, don't do it just for the money. Do it because you want to serve our nation!
     
  12. shamrock2006

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    Yea...this is true. and also VERY unlikely as you said. When I talked w/ my recruiter...he basically said that would only happen of WWIII ever broke out..and even then it's a stretch. You goin military Insip9reg?
     
  13. Regmata

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    Pretty sure that they have not called up civilian reservists since before nam, and that was likely for infantry. It just doesn't happen.

    Does anyone know of the likelihood of being deployed? What about for dentist in the reserves?
     
  14. onamission

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    and this is what I know ........
    Wait, I'll start with my background ......
    I've got 10 years active duty as a Naval Aviator and 8 years so far in the Navy Reserves. I'm currently a Commander (CDR) which is an O-5. I'm also a dentist wannabe like you guys. Only I haven't been accepted anywhere yet.:( I have looked into the scholarship stuff myself and I'll do my best to pass on all that I know so far. My info comes straight from the Dental Corps Career Planner in Memphis. He is a Captain (O-6) in the Navy Dental Corps which means that he is a dentist, not a recruiter!! Recruiters earn medals and commendations for filling their quotas. You are a recruiter's "bread & butter". ALWAYS take everything a recruiter says with a grain of salt and make sure that any "promises" you've been given are in writing (get a copy of the DOD instruction that states/defines the promise). With that said, here's what I know:

    HPSP (Professional Scholarship Program) - This is the scholarship that most people are interested in. You get full tuition paid for (no price cap - University of the Pacific anyone?), a monthly stipend, textbooks & fees (like instrument rentals, etc). I did not ask if that covers the fee for medical insurance, but I do know that you will not be able to get medical care at the local military base because you'll be IRR while in school. (The IRR is the inactice reserve, you accrue time in service but no pay). You are expected to spend 40-45 days on paid actice duty each summer, Shamrock mentioned this. If your school's schedule can't accommodate you leaving, the Navy will just cut you orders to your school where you go about your bussiness as a student except with pay, sweet deal. :laugh: So, this is how this works ..... you get a letter of acceptance into a school, sign on the military dotted line (assuming you are granted the scholarship) and are commissioned an Ensign (ENS O-1) in the IRR, then upon graduation you are promoted to Lieutenant (LT O-3). I don't know who told you that you'd be an O-4, but that is NOT correct! (Unless you have prior service AS AN OFFICER and then you get credit for only HALF of your active duty time towards your entry rank.) It is possible that if you specilize you may come in at a higher rank, but it would have to be an extremely under-manned specialty because you are given your authority based on rank. In other words, you can't come in to the Military as an O-4, where they'd expect you to be able to perform as a department head when the only thing you know so far is how to wear the uniform. You can apply for this program AFTER you've started school. It's a year for year pay-back, min 3 years. I've never heard of anyone NOT owing extra time for specializing or for taking longer to get through school. Once they pay the money to train you, they expect to get your expertise in return! [There are programs geared at specialing that can be applied for once you are serving on active duty. I don't know much about them.] The HSCP is great if you want to go to a really expensive school &/or want no debts!

    HSCP (Service Collegiate Program) - Once accepted into this program you are an E-6. You earn all pay and entitlements of an E-6 the whole time while in school. Healthcare, COLA, variable housing allowance (VHA), etc. But you pay for school, books, etc. And, No, you don't need to wear the uniform. Besides, even if you did, the Navy dentists wear scrubs! Then when you graduate you are commissioned an O-3.

    In the Navy you can expect to be stationed somewhere for one year where you will rotate through all the departments for experience, like a residency without the certificate. Places like Great Lakes, Miramar, Bethesda, etc. Once that year is up you will get orders to go operational. This means on a ship, to Japan or over to the sandbox with the Marines. Yes, the Marines fall under the DoN, but don't tell them that, it fries their little Jarhead brain! :D I have no idea if the other services handles their "newbees" this way. NONE of the services will pay for you to set up a private practice once your commitment is up!

    Positives about Navy life: It's a really awesome experience. You'll go places you'd never see otherwise and live in places that you'd never imagine. :) The Navy is the biggest and strongest fraternity in the world. You'll make friends that quickly become family, for life. If you have a family that you're leaving behind while deploying, there's a huge support network. You're never alone if you don't want to be.

    Negatives: If you are married &/or have kids be prepared for long separations. You'll go places you'd never see otherwise and live in places that you'd never imagine. :( Six month deployments if attached to a boat, possible 1 year "unaccompanied orders" overseas when the need arises. But, the needs of the military always come first. You may be offered a choice of a few places to go, choose one and then get the other. There's an old saying in the Navy that "Timing is Everything".

    With that being said, make sure that you are certain about your decision before you sign on the dotted line. There is a war on and who knows when it will end. There are some military programs out there that pay back your student loans after school and then you owe them service. If you're uncertain about commiting now, look into those. Or wait a year and then decide. I hope this helps and good luck!
     
  15. onamission

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    They DO call up reservists. Every dentist & doctor I know that chose to stay in the reserves after their commitment has since gotten out. If called up you do have to leave your practice behind and go. It does happen and is happening. In fact, the medical fields are one of the most under-manned areas of the military. That's why they have so many civilian contract medical professionals. Doesn't mean it will happen to you, but who can predict the future. You have to be prepared for the possibility. Like I said in my previous post, there's a war going on and who knows when it will end. Or who knows what will be happening in the world when you are a reservist. If you plan on serving a full 20 years to retirement or even 8 years active duty, the whole thing is a moot point. Just know what you're getting into before you commit. And please review what I said about recruiters!
     
  16. shamrock2006

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    Yea pretty much...listen to this guy he knows what he's talkin about. Even though I've chosen to go Air Force, it's basically the same...although I think the rankings are slightly different...but it's still O-1 to O-3 upon graduation..this means Lt to Captain for the Air Force..but no real difference there. As far as leaving or being on active duty for 45 days...again, what onamission said is also true. Will you have to leave school? No...if you're in school, and go on active duty...it will say "Campus something or...Student something" in your orders...basically meaning you get the pay and the benefits w/o having to report anywhere. And I do know, about the whole insurance thing, the military (at least the AF does)will pick that up if it is REQUIRED by your school. If it isn't, you are on your own. But as was previously stated, look at the whole package before you sign...there's a lot to think about when going on this scholarship. But if you decide that it's right for you...you really can't go wrong. Many people hear "military" and cringe..they assume that you're going to be dropped in the middle of a warzone and have to go fight. Do you think the military would spend over 200k on your education only to put you directly in harms way? Dont think so. As far as reservists getting call up and getting deployed and all that...my uncle is a Col. now in the USAF...a flight surgeon actually and basically runs **** haha. Even when he was a captian out of med school, they would ask him if he was ok w/ getting shipped here or there..they never just "sent" him. And, according to him, the guys who do get sent over are usually the lifers..the ones who are making a career out of the military. This is just what he told me as he's already done 2 voluntary tours in Iraq setting up and running hospitals throughout the country. More or less, this whole thing is about what you value...if money is your only purpose, dont go military as I said. Lots to think about...trust me I pondered all this for months before I officially signed up last week.
     
  17. jfitzpat

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    What you are saying is for people who elect to keep themselves in active reserve, right? I have heard from several people that they have NEVER called up a dentist in the history of the IRR......not that it won't happen sometime in the future. This is especially true for the Navy and Army, which experience yearly shortfalls in recruiting dental students.
     
  18. KOM

    KOM Senior Member
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    I've heard this one too, but I don't think the price tag on your education matters at all when it comes to war.

    I'm sure you're aware the military is funded by the federal government so the military isn't really spending the 200 grand on you. Taxpayers are. When it comes to unpopular wars and military recruitment rates become stagnant you better believe those taxpayers, rather than letting the govt institute a draft, would rather you be put in harms way than them.

    This is a worst case scenario and I agree with you Shamrock that the chances of a dentist putting their lives on the line in the face of battle are slim, but the point that everyone needs to understand is that if you sign that line you are now their property. As onamission said, make sure you're in it for the right reasons.

    On another note, from what I've heard the military/govt ends up investing quite a bit more on their pilots and don't seem to have any problem putting them in harms way.

    I applied for the AF scholarship by the way...but I also really love shooting guns and figure if I have to drop my handpiece and fight for this country at least I'll have partially covered my a$$ by being a pretty good shot.
     
  19. Regmata

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    Yes JFitz, referring to Active Reserves...they don't call you up once you are out...it is possible, but about as likely as getting struck by lightning
     
  20. lnsip9reg

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    I was seriously considering it.. but I have commitment issues, hah! :D
     
  21. onamission

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    Yes, the active reserve (it's actually called selective reserve or SELRES) are the people getting called up. These are the weekend warriors you think of, one weekend a month and 2 weeks active duty a year. IRR people are not currently getting called up, at least none that I'm aware of. Make sure you know which one you are committing to. Read your contract.

    As far as being put in harms way, well it goes like this ........ a member of the Dental Corps (DC) while on active duty (or as a recalled SELRES) will be given orders as a dentist. Where you're a dentist determines the danger. Stateside, most Europeans commands, on a boat, etc are as safe as being civilian, maybe safer if you're on a secure base. Iraq, any of the "Stans" (Afghanistan, etc.), Korea, just about anywhere that there are people who hate Americans, not so safe. Of course while you're "drilling and filling" isn't the dangerous time, it's during liberty &/or traveling to/from base that you're at risk. Yes, millions of dollars are spent on pilots who are then sent into harms way, but that's what they are trained for ...... hence the term "fighter pilot". Since I don't know of any dentists with warfare specialties, any harm that would come to you would in essence be "collateral damage". That's the difference.

    Hope this clears it up a bit.:D
     
  22. jmick101

    jmick101 Kung Fu DDS
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    You should ask this in the military dentistry forum on SDN. You'll get more information from people who have actually done it.
     
  23. shamrock2006

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    I might be wrong here..but I think if you go into a specialty program run by the military...you go through those years of training and THEN start your 4 yrs of service from the HPSP. However, if you go into a civilian specialty program...say a 2 yr ortho...and the military pays...you owe them 6 yrs. I'm sayin this b/c I know if you go on the HPSP...and get into the AEGD program w/ the army, navy, or AF...that is a neutral year and does not count towards your 4 yr committment. It starts after you complete the program. All I really know about specialties in the military is that these people get paid more..they get their base pay w/ allowances...and a "specialty pay"..I dont know how much it is..but it is more than just the average officer of the same rank.
     
  24. soswank

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    Can someone elaborate on this a bit. If someone goes for the HSCP, they don't get their tuition reimbursed rather $3,000 a month stipend only? If that is the case, then isn't the HPSP a better option because even though you are getting a smaller stipend, your tuition is still getting paid in full.
     
  25. onamission

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    I haven't looked up the current E-6 pay, but if it's $3K/month then that's your pay (it's not a stipend). Whether one is a better deal or not depends on your situation.

    Pros of HSCP:
    - earn years in service towards active duty retirement (not just time in service for pay rates)
    - all pay & allowances (VHA is a big deal if you plan on going to school in a town with a high cost of living)
    - good deal for people with families - steady income & medical coverage (Tricare) for your family while in school and you can pay off your loans while serving your commitment.

    Pros of HPSP:
    - tuition, books & fees covered
    - modest monthly stipend
    - no loans when you graduate

    Hope this helps.
     
  26. onamission

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    Sorry, VHA is actually called BAH (Basic Allowance for Housing). Sometimes it's hard to stop using the terms from my era. Also, you might be interested in this link:

    http://www.militarypay.com/Allowances.html
     
  27. Drill2Fill

    Drill2Fill DentalStudentWannabe
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    You could take a look at the military dentist subforum, it has lot of good info.
     
  28. soswank

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    Thanks onamission, one more clarification. Do all branches offer HSCP or its a Navy only program?
     
  29. onamission

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    that all the services do, but not for sure. And they may be called something different. Shamrock, any input?
     
  30. shamrock2006

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    The navy does and I believe the Army does as well. I dont know about the Air Force but I would assume they do. Wouldn't make sense for them not to have it...but dont quote me on that.
     
  31. Zanderale6

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    You also need to take into consideration how expensive the school is that you'll be attending. If you'll be in-state w/ a scholarship, then the HSCP 3K a month should be enough to pay for school AND live comfortably (esp. with the BAH). If you're going to a ridiculously expensive school, though, the HPSP is really the only logical choice.
     
  32. blankguy

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    Let me add that the HPSP does not cover for room and board, and laptop expenses.
     
  33. shamrock2006

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    that's why you have the stipend. it's around 1300/month (taxable) for 10.5 months. But for those 1.5 months on "active duty" you get your officers pay (taxable)..and then about 1k for housing and food allowances..this is not taxable..meaning you get an extra grand for that 1.5 months. If a laptop is required..the schoarlship picks it up..so if you go to NYU..they will buy your laptop and PDA.
     
  34. blankguy

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    They pay you because you are commissioned as a reserve officer while in school. As to whether the 1300 and officers pay while in "active duty" is enough that's a whole different matter. My understanding is the laptop and PDA may/may not be reinbursable even if its required.
     
  35. shamrock2006

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    If it is required by the school, I guarantee you that you will be reimbursed. I know w/ the AF...if you fill out the reimbursement form, send them your check, a syllabus, and even a short letter from a faculty memeber saying it is required..you will get it all back. It may sound like a lot to go through..but they just do it to make sure they're not getting screwed. the money you get may not be enough to cover everything...and probably wont be if you have some big expenses..I know for me, even w/ the scholarship, i'll probably take out a 20k loan at most just to be safe...even though I'll probably only use a fraction of that. Doesnt bother me though..paying back a few grand will be easy no matter what.
     
  36. blankguy

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    Good point. I guess there is no way to avoid loans. But then again $20000 is a heck of a lot better than $200000.
     
  37. SHC1984

    SHC1984 Membership Revoked
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    DO NOT do the army or the navy. If you have to do one do the air force. But none of them is worth it to me.




     
  38. Drill2Fill

    Drill2Fill DentalStudentWannabe
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    Why not the army and navy?
     
  39. Denticized

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    Money-wise all three should be the same since they are all governmentally funded. However, two things are of concern:
    1) lending of dentists from branch to branch (i.e. from army to navy) in case of need
    2) The three have different bases so when choosing which you want to commit to, be careful that they have they base of your choice.

    But other than that I don't see why anybody should not join. Let's go through the math:
    1) Full tuition (for NYU it would be 280K)
    2) Living cost (monthly 1200)
    3) Dentist salary once you graduate (up to 80k a year, bonus included)

    So you are given over 300k for the four years and plus you're making money once you come out. I do not think you'd otherwise be able to pay off the 300k debt you owe in four years and have some money left for you. Can you?

    this message was brought to by the U.S. government
     
  40. Zanderale6

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    Are you saying this because you assume the Air Force dentists are farther out of harm's way? ...

    In the Navy (my branch of choice), there are only around 30 slots available for dentists practicing on board a ship. You can look at this in two ways: "Phew ... there's really not a good chance of me serving anywhere near the action" ... or "Rats ... I'll probably never get to serve on a ship." I suppose it depends on the person, but I'd actually enjoy it.

    In truth, the vast majority of navy dentists serve at one of 28 locations scattered throughout the coastal United States (including 4 locations in California, 2 locations in Florida, and 1 location in Hawaii). Each of these are located in a seaport city, so you know you're not being stationed out in the middle of nowhere.

    As far as the overseas bases in hostile territory go ... you could, in the Navy, perhaps end up working in Italy (LaMadelina, Naples, or Sigonella), Spain (Rota), Britain (London), Iceland (Keflavik), Japan (Okinawa), or Guam. ... That's it! With the exception of Guam (which I'm unfamiliar with), I'd be more than comfortable serving in any of those foreign locations.

    Go Navy:thumbup:
     
  41. Drill2Fill

    Drill2Fill DentalStudentWannabe
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    That sounds like a very good deal.
     
  42. Simiam

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    I'd prefer going the loan route. Who cares if you get 200k in debt on 10-30year notes on 2.86% Interest rates. In many areas you will come out making 120k a year/10k a month.... Who cares if you have to pay 1000 a month in loans. plus by your 4th year if you managed to buy in to a practice you could be making a lot more than 120... Unless you really want to serve in the military, it doesn't make any sense. Money wise it's not that big a deal.
     
  43. shamrock2006

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    Yea this is something a lot of people take into consideration. I mean the money is a huge factor don't get me wrong, and it was a concern of mine when I decided to apply for the scholarship...mainly b/c since day 1 of undergrad i've been on my own financially..no help from anyone..even though my parents do make a very nice living. Basically, the way I see it, no matter how succesful someone is right out of dental school..they will not pay off all their debt in 4 yrs...not even close...unless they got some $$ going in from the school, or go to one of the very few schools where tuition is reasonably lower than others. Why? because they will have not only school debt (w/ interest), but debt if they decide to start/buy into a practice (w/ interest), mortages (w/ interest), car payments (w/ interest), insurances, and any other types of bills you can think of....plus, if you already have a family..that is going to add to it. I'm not saying it's bad to not go military..the vast majority dont and do just fine. It's simply a matter of preference. As i've said before..the fact that they'll cover everything and pay for you to live while your at school is nice..but there has to be other factors. But I dont think anyone can give any logical reasons as to why it's not a good deal financially...those who say they would never do it are saying so for a variety of other reasons...whatever those may be.
     
  44. soswank

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_Navy_installations#Overseas
    Wikipedia links a lot more then the ones you mentioned above. Could you clarify? Personally, I've been to the locations in the Middle East, except for Oman, but those are all good locations.
     
  45. Snahster

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    It's not 4 years....it's 4 years + reserve for the rest of your life.... i think i can pay it off in that amount of time.
     
  46. jfitzpat

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    I'm not sure where you get your information, but it is NOT reserve for the rest of your life. It is only inactive reserve for four more years, and as we established earlier in the thread, you have a better chance getting struck by lightning than being called back up.
     
  47. reapply2007

    reapply2007 Senior Member
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    I hear they give you a pistol if you go into the military as a dentist. I wonder what it would take for them to give us machine guns?
     
  48. Zanderale6

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    I honestly don't know. ... My recruiter provided me with a detailed list of all the duty station choices for Navy dentists. The only foreign duty stations on the list were the nine I mentioned above. I'll be heading into Boston soon to meet w/ my recruiter and accept my scholarship not too long from now. If you're willing to wait, I can get an answer from her for you.
     
  49. soswank

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    Please do. I don't meet the eligibility requirements till January '08, so I have time.
     
  50. shamrock2006

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    you are not reserve for the rest of your life. its 4 yrs inactive reserve after ur 4 yr committment. What does that mean? it lets you plug away at the 20 yr retirement plan w/o having to really do anything. And the odds of getting called up are slim to none..and i think slim just walked out the door. Plus, there are many dentists who choose to stay in the military as career active duty officers...if they were going to call up dentists..why in the hell would they call up reservists?
     
  51. onamission

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    Regarding a reserve retirement ........
    To earn a reserve retirement you have to have 20 "good" years. A good year is one in which you earn 50 "drill points". SELRES earn their points by drilling, one weekend is 4 drills so they earn 4 points for each weekend, plus you get 15 free points given to you each year. And then you do 2 weeks active duty a year. Now, if for some reason you fall short on points and you only earn 49 points, that year does not count toward your retirement. It's just gone. While in the IRR you can earn points toward a retirment by doing online courses (which are affectionately called "coloring books"). You can be in the IRR for 20 years, but if you don't work towards a "good" year, those years don't mean a thing. That's why you're less likely to be called up while in the IRR. The payments for the reserve retirement don't begin until you're 62 (maybe 60, can't remember off the top of my head, I haven't had my coffee yet!) An active duty retirement begins the day you get out, but you have to have a full 20 years active duty. If you serve 19 years and 364 days active and 1 day in the reserves, it's a reserve retirement for you!
    And although there are dentists who choose to stay active duty for 20, theres still a shortage. So, I just wanted to clear that up. There really is no free lunch and if it sounds too good to be true ...... it might be. But, all and all, the programs the military offer really are a good deal. But only if you look forward to serving for a few years. There's really nothing like it and it'll be an experience you'll never forget and can't get anyplace else.
    And yes, the Navy really does have the best duty stations because they are always seaports.
     

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