johndoe3344

7+ Year Member
Jun 1, 2009
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I was interviewing at several places with one plane trip, and the wifi at the hotel(s) were sketchy, so I decided I would write all the post-interviewing thank you's after I got back.

On one of the notes I wrote "...I enjoyed meeting you on Monday" when the day should have been Wednesday. All the other specifics of the note were correct.

Is this a big deal? Should I send another email to apologize? Send the entire note again all together? Ignore it?

I'm freaking out because this is a program I care about.

Thanks!
 

IMPD

5+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2012
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Academic Administration
As is the general rule, you have no control over this anymore so forget about it.

As a specific rule, I have now conducted close to 100 interviews and have no clear memory of which happened on which day.

Another way of saying - chill.
 
Nov 28, 2013
10
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Medical Student
It doesn't seem like this is a mistake someone would notice. Even if they did, they'd understand you had made a mistake. I think sending a correction might make you look a little eccentric.

I'm not sure if this has been discussed, but some mistakes could be huge. If in your correspondence you misspell someone's name that's actually a big deal because someone would notice and many would be irked by it. In that case I would send an email or note apologizing for the mistake.
 

HelpPleaseMD

7+ Year Member
Aug 4, 2011
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It doesn't seem like this is a mistake someone would notice. Even if they did, they'd understand you had made a mistake. I think sending a correction might make you look a little eccentric.

I'm not sure if this has been discussed, but some mistakes could be huge. If in your correspondence you misspell someone's name that's actually a big deal because someone would notice and many would be irked by it. In that case I would send an email or note apologizing for the mistake.
i am quite sure that most people do not care about thank you notes. several programs i interviewed at explicitly stated DO NOT SEND us thank you notes. email if you have questions about the program
 

IM2GI

5+ Year Member
Dec 5, 2013
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Attending Physician
What a ridiculous thing to worry about. Stop over thinking.
 
Nov 28, 2013
10
0
Status
Medical Student
i am quite sure that most people do not care about thank you notes. several programs i interviewed at explicitly stated DO NOT SEND us thank you notes. email if you have questions about the program
I agree with this too. I sort of feel like the only thing a thank you note could do is potentially hurt you if they think it's really weird or you make a bad mistake like get the program name wrong or the person's name wrong.

However, there's a certain psychological factor related to thank you notes. Some people want to do everything to get into the program of their choice. Should you not match, or not match into the program you wanted, if you sent a thank you note at least you'll feel like you did everything you could.
 

IM2GI

5+ Year Member
Dec 5, 2013
882
737
Status
Attending Physician
I agree with this too. I sort of feel like the only thing a thank you note could do is potentially hurt you if they think it's really weird or you make a bad mistake like get the program name wrong or the person's name wrong.

However, there's a certain psychological factor related to thank you notes. Some people want to do everything to get into the program of their choice. Should you not match, or not match into the program you wanted, if you sent a thank you note at least you'll feel like you did everything you could.
I think hand-written thank you notes are a waste of time. Email is a nice and easy gesture and allows them to hit reply and give you some potential feedback.