Jan 4, 2019
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I applied for on campus last night, but will only accept if I get apartment style, unfurnished. I think it would be so helpful not to have to go to New York to look for housing or deal with brokers and getting my parents to be my guarantor, but I’ve been out of school for a little bit and I don’t want to live with a kitchenette and dorm furniture. I’m wondering about how to go about finding a roommate to look for off-campus housing with. Do we have a Facebook page for that?
Hi, I am going to be attending Columbia this Fall too! Would love to chat more about info or advice you have?
 

greysloan03

2+ Year Member
May 25, 2017
32
10
51
Hi everyone,

I’m applying this upcoming fall for Fall 2020 MPH programs and was wondering if anyone could offer any advice for applying to Global Health, MCH, and Health Equity programs especially with a low gpa (~3.2)? I’m specifically looking at Emory, Chapel Hill, Boston, Georgia State, and Morehouse School of Medicine.
 
May 13, 2019
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Other Health Professions Student
Hi everyone,

I’m applying this upcoming fall for Fall 2020 MPH programs and was wondering if anyone could offer any advice for applying to Global Health, MCH, and Health Equity programs especially with a low gpa (~3.2)? I’m specifically looking at Emory, Chapel Hill, Boston, Georgia State, and Morehouse School of Medicine.
I'm an MPH student with a low undergrad GPA (2.58) and GRE (145Q, 155V); however, I'm studying epidemiology. Regardless, I think MPH programs lean more towards prior experience in public health or a related field, so you should craft your application to capitalize on relevant experience. For example, I studied molecular biology and I took several graduate courses in bioinformatics, so my statement of purpose focused on how these disciplines benefit public health, and then I expanded on these ideas. For my CV / Resume, I put down relevant work experience and strengthened those experiences by listing awards I received; such as employee of the month/quarter. To conclude, have a good grasp of what public health is all about, then use your experience to create an outstanding application. I think it's important to remember that public health is interdisciplinary, so admissions probably like to see how your unique experience applies to your desired program.
 

greysloan03

2+ Year Member
May 25, 2017
32
10
51
I'm an MPH student with a low undergrad GPA (2.58) and GRE (145Q, 155V); however, I'm studying epidemiology. Regardless, I think MPH programs lean more towards prior experience in public health or a related field, so you should craft your application to capitalize on relevant experience. For example, I studied molecular biology and I took several graduate courses in bioinformatics, so my statement of purpose focused on how these disciplines benefit public health, and then I expanded on these ideas. For my CV / Resume, I put down relevant work experience and strengthened those experiences by listing awards I received; such as employee of the month/quarter. To conclude, have a good grasp of what public health is all about, then use your experience to create an outstanding application. I think it's important to remember that public health is interdisciplinary, so admissions probably like to see how your unique experience applies to your desired program.
Thank you!
 
Jun 13, 2018
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Hello everyone,

I applied and was accepted to pursue an MS in Industrial Hygiene in the Environmental Health department at the University of Iowa College of Public health. I have a 2.63 GPA in Environmental Chemistry, and a 138 in the Quant, a 143 in the English, and a 5 in the analytical writing on the GRE. This program is fully funded with tuition and stipend. What lead me to this program is the research I completed as an undergrad, working in 3 research groups who produced a publication with each one, and a strong letter of recommendation.

I feel extremely fortunate that I have been accepted, and that I may be the exception. A bit of imposter Syndrome has taken over, and am curious if anyone has gone through this. What I believe got me in, is that worked in the lab doing research for my now advisor so I believe he pulled a handful of strings. I applied to one school knowing that my connections was my bet for grad school. Thank you all for reading and I'd love to hear from you all about your experiences with my headspace, and what I may be able to do to quell it.
 

Dwan

7+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2011
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Ah....pretty disappointing but not exactly unexpected....now I kinda wish I had had a chance to go to the admitted students' day, but ultimately Harvard was still my best option, I think. Still, thanks to your insights I can better use my time during the summer to prepare...Thanks to you both!
I completed the Harvard MPH, and I don't see where people are getting the idea that it's a competitive environment. None of my classes ever had a curve, unlike in undergraduate. I focused my time on outside activities and interests, and primarily studied for the topics that were relevant to my field. For the majority of the exams, the class averages were hidden to avoid competition and comparison - the few times they were revealed, they were solid (B to A-) among the most rigorous statistics courses, and A for the softer courses. The GPA requirement to graduate was something like a 2.7 (for masters students) which is not very stringent considering graduate level inflation. While there may be some students who care about getting the best GPA possible, all whom I met were more focused on taking advantage of all the opportunities available at Harvard. I didn't know the GPAs of anyone I met there (no one cared to compare/compete with me), and while it's hard work, everyone accepted should have no problems passing. In terms of ECs and other opportunities, there are so much available in the field of PH, and people have such diverse goals, that it's very unlikely you'd be in direct competition with anyone for your particular interests.
 
Jan 19, 2018
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Other Health Professions Student
I completed the Harvard MPH, and I don't see where people are getting the idea that it's a competitive environment. None of my classes ever had a curve, unlike in undergraduate. I focused my time on outside activities and interests, and primarily studied for the topics that were relevant to my field. For the majority of the exams, the class averages were hidden to avoid competition and comparison - the few times they were revealed, they were solid (B to A-) among the most rigorous statistics courses, and A for the softer courses. The GPA requirement to graduate was something like a 2.7 (for masters students) which is not very stringent considering graduate level inflation. While there may be some students who care about getting the best GPA possible, all whom I met were more focused on taking advantage of all the opportunities available at Harvard. I didn't know the GPAs of anyone I met there (no one cared to compare/compete with me), and while it's hard work, everyone accepted should have no problems passing. In terms of ECs and other opportunities, there are so much available in the field of PH, and people have such diverse goals, that it's very unlikely you'd be in direct competition with anyone for your particular interests.
It seems from your past posts that you have an MD and an MPH? If so, your viewpoint may be different than people who are just trying to make do with an MPH as a terminal stand alone degree. People doing the MPH at other good institutions like JHU even, point out how the job market is tough for MPHers. So, I'm thinking that some people at Harvard doing the MPH currently might face issues regarding the job market for strictly public health, also things might have possibly changed since you did the MPH there. Boston is oversaturated in terms of public health opportunities and while in the past Boston had the most biomedical jobs, the hub for that is in southern California now. Sometimes some not so good national public health policy has come out of Harvard and BU's public health schools, so maybe some people are wary about this, but there is definitely an ivory tower mentality that is more pronounced in Boston.

I'm not saying Harvard isn't a solid school for the MPH, I think it is legitimate for the policy side of public health. But everybody ranks schools differently, I think that if you are interested in public health purely, and want to focus on high-yield areas like global health, epidemiology or research related stuff then places like Emory, JHU, Tulane and others will do at minimum as good as a job and often times quite better than Harvard. I think it is important to go to a public health school that is both staffed by excellent faculty, but also grounded in reality and accessible to humbler, but more optimistic students who want to be global citizens and truly work on pressing global health issues, not just collect a fancy degree and go into something else.

Learning environment matters and affability and availability of professors and classmates matters too, Boston has never ranked high in these metrics, so I don't doubt that people are turned off by Harvard for this reason. I'm sure experiences vary, but people in Boston can be extremely rude . . . the burden is on you to get to know them before they'll respect you, but why not just go to a friendlier school to start with? From my experience, the Harvard MPHer I knew was uber competitive, and I think faculty even view students as their future competition and this is part of the stress.
 

Dwan

7+ Year Member
Oct 5, 2011
290
392
181
Status
Resident [Any Field]
It seems from your past posts that you have an MD and an MPH? If so, your viewpoint may be different than people who are just trying to make do with an MPH as a terminal stand alone degree. People doing the MPH at other good institutions like JHU even, point out how the job market is tough for MPHers. So, I'm thinking that some people at Harvard doing the MPH currently might face issues regarding the job market for strictly public health, also things might have possibly changed since you did the MPH there. Boston is oversaturated in terms of public health opportunities and while in the past Boston had the most biomedical jobs, the hub for that is in southern California now. Sometimes some not so good national public health policy has come out of Harvard and BU's public health schools, so maybe some people are wary about this, but there is definitely an ivory tower mentality that is more pronounced in Boston.

I'm not saying Harvard isn't a solid school for the MPH, I think it is legitimate for the policy side of public health. But everybody ranks schools differently, I think that if you are interested in public health purely, and want to focus on high-yield areas like global health, epidemiology or research related stuff then places like Emory, JHU, Tulane and others will do at minimum as good as a job and often times quite better than Harvard. I think it is important to go to a public health school that is both staffed by excellent faculty, but also grounded in reality and accessible to humbler, but more optimistic students who want to be global citizens and truly work on pressing global health issues, not just collect a fancy degree and go into something else.

Learning environment matters and affability and availability of professors and classmates matters too, Boston has never ranked high in these metrics, so I don't doubt that people are turned off by Harvard for this reason. I'm sure experiences vary, but people in Boston can be extremely rude . . . the burden is on you to get to know them before they'll respect you, but why not just go to a friendlier school to start with? From my experience, the Harvard MPHer I knew was uber competitive, and I think faculty even view students as their future competition and this is part of the stress.
I'm not arguing that Harvard is the best school for everyone's goals, there are too many factors that go into that and many will be personal decisions. I'm just stating my experiences there for the MPH curriculum in particular. Most the faculty and students were kind and supportive, particularly because this is not a field anyone goes into for the money - it attracts a more humble crowd, and the prestige is not as relevant as in other fields. Even if you wanted to compete, you'd be hard pressed to find a way to - classes are not on a curve, no one cares about your grades, and there are an abundance of EC opportunities to be involved in. Many projects are collaborative and you'd only be screwing yourself by shooting down your talented classmates. Boston stereotypes don't really apply (even if true), as the class is highly diverse, many being international. Our graduates also have had success in getting jobs all over the world, so you're not confined to Boston, but the viability of a Harvard MPH degree is a whole different topic, and again, highly personal. If you don't like the city, that's obviously a good reason not to go. I do think epidemiology/research is one of Harvard's major strengths - the courses are rigorous and practical, and I was able to publish first-author papers in top journals during my time there. Harvard and JHU have by far the most NIH funding and research faculty of the PH schools - this doesn't matter if they don't have a PI of your interest, so other schools may be a better fit, it's just more likely they will have someone studying your topic. I worked with several research mentors on a niche topic I wanted to study, and they were all very strong and provided me with personalized guidance (regular weekly meetings, strong letters of support, scholarship/awards), that I had never received at other institutions. That being said, there are many excellent MPH programs, and most people will be happy wherever they end up.
 
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Jul 2, 2018
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Hey everybody! I took a look at the MPH admissions for UC Berkeley, and I was wondering if it's true (for Berkeley or MPH programs in general) that 40-50 people apply to the programs each year?
 
Jan 24, 2019
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Hey everybody! I took a look at the MPH admissions for UC Berkeley, and I was wondering if it's true (for Berkeley or MPH programs in general) that 40-50 people apply to the programs each year?
I really doubt that. UC Berkeley is the top UC and a fairly high ranked school. A lot of people on this thread alone applied to Berkeley. If you consider everyone in the United States and internationally, there are probably a lot of more applicants. Are you sure you didn't misread and see they only admitted 40-50 people each year?
 
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May 10, 2019
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I really doubt that. UC Berkeley is the top UC and a fairly high ranked school. A lot of people on this thread alone applied to Berkeley. If you consider everyone in the United States and internationally, there are probably a lot of more applicants. Are you sure you didn't misread and see they only admitted 40-50 people each year?
I can see where exopro is coming from. If you look at the "Admit Stats" tab for some of the Berkeley MPH concentrations , they list their acceptance rates pretty clearly to me. Their 2 Year Environmental Health Sciences MPH list an admissions ratio of 14/42 (33%), so it would appear that only 42 people applied to that specific MPH concentration and 14 were admitted. Adding up all of the MPH areas of study is a different story, although the numbers still seem small to me for such a competitive program.
 
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Jul 2, 2018
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I can see where exopro is coming from. If you look at the "Admit Stats" tab for some of the Berkeley MPH concentrations , they list their acceptance rates pretty clearly to me. Their 2 Year Environmental Health Sciences MPH list an admissions ratio of 14/42 (33%), so it would appear that only 42 people applied to that specific MPH concentration and 14 were admitted. Adding up all of the MPH areas of study is a different story, although the numbers still seem small to me for such a competitive program.
Thanks for the clear up. It was just odd that it said around 40 people applied. It gives me a bit of hope. :arghh:
 
Jun 2, 2019
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Hi! Just wondering if anyone has any insight on the accelerated policy and management program at Emory? Obviously getting out of school early is nice, however, I’m wondering if the program is doable.
Looking to apply for fall 2019