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Muscles of the Human body (sep. in relation to functional anatomy for OMM)

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by applicant2002, Nov 30, 2002.

  1. applicant2002

    applicant2002 Senior Member
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    Does anyone have any suggestions for a good way to memorize/know all the muslces in the human body. I.e. do you have any good mnemonics or techniques, for the names, origins, insertions, and actions? or is it it plain memorization? :) I am asking especially in relation to muscle energy techniques for OMM. Yea, we can just memorize the technique, but unless we know the muscles and actions, we don't really know why we're doing what we're doing.

    Thanks for all and any help. as always, your kindness and thoughtfulness is greatly appreciated.

    :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
     
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  3. Dr JPH

    Dr JPH Membership Revoked
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    Unfortunately much of it is memorization.

    I do feel, however, that OPP class has helped me to learn the muscles and their actions and attachments.

    There are great flash cards out there that are directly from the Netter book. They were pretty popular during first term here at PCOM.

    Other than that, anatomy is just repetition of the material and understanding how and why things move certain ways.

    Also, do a Yahoo! search for "medical mnemonics". You may find some helpful hints.
     
  4. Dagny

    Dagny PGY-1
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    With respect to the extremities (arms and legs), it helped when I brought my notes in from class to anatomy lab, and memorized lecture notes and practical material together. You can actually contract the muscles on the cadaver if the muscles are still intact, as well as see where they insert and originate. Seeing these muscles as I learned about them helped. There are some mnemonics. For example, SITS for the rotator cuff muscles (Supraspinatus, Infraspinatus, teres minor, Subscapularis). Board review books have some helpful mnemonics. Repetition is important. Good luck!
     
  5. M00se

    M00se Member
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    As an instructor in A&P for a few years I can offer only 3 pieces of advice.

    1. Learn the bones. Every process you learn on a bone is an attachment site for muscles

    2. Reapproach the subject. The more times you come back to Anatomy the easier it is.

    3. Work out the muscles individually in the gym to help you remember.

    hope this helps
     
  6. fasciaLATA

    fasciaLATA Junior Member

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    One obvious word... NETTER. While I think muscle origin, insertion, action, innervation charts are helpful I've found it much more beneficial to visualize the origins and insertions. Netter has great pics of these (color coded on bones). It's a good way to start. I think it gets to be too much if you just try to "memorize" it all from a chart or notes. Something else, and I apologize if this is already obvious, but think by muscle compartments. It's easier to bring back 5 or 6 muscles at a time as opposed to an entire limb. good luck!
     

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