Jul 31, 2016
13
1
Status
Non-Student
Hello! im a 10th grader, and i know im young but i have big goals in pharmacy. i wanted to know what my chances are and what i need to do more of or do differently as im still young i still have tons of time to reach my goal and you guys advice will really help me so plzzz! respond! STATS: 9th grade Finished with 4.1 weighted
10 grade expecting the same
a little of volunteer hours
2nd in conference wrestler
should i take all science and math ap classes or only a few as if i take all my gpa will drop to about 3.5 but if i only take 4 i will probably Finnish high school with a 3.9 or 3.8. were should i volunteer at? also what are some decent schools to go to for 0-6 and what are some reasonable easier schools to get into?
also can you guys plzzzz list some of yr high school stats for getting into the 0-6 program.
 

giga

U.S. Public Health Service
10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2005
768
1,268
On the land and the sea for humanity
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I don't have any specific answers to your questions. My guess is that keeping your GPA up is more important than stacking up on APs, as long as you still have a few AP classes under your belt. I'm also not sure how you came to the conclusion that your GPA will drop so much if you take all science and math AP classes - as long as you spread them out through the next 3 years of high school, and have good time management skills, it should be fairly manageable.

Volunteer in health care settings - pharmacies, hospitals, etc. Make sure to shadow a number of different fields (nursing, medicine, pharmacy, even dental). It will help you a lot, not just into getting into school, but in better articulating why you want to do pharmacy specifically when you interview for pharmacy schools.

I am extremely curious... What big goals do you have for pharmacy?
 
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Jan 18, 2013
60
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take whatever science/math classes you can handle. I think I took all honors/AP of almost everything lol. AP Chem, AP Bio, AP Calculus AB, AP Psychology, AP Physics etc. I think my AP exam scores were 4, 3, 5, 5, and 2? LOL. My GPA was 3.7~ weighted (3.4 unweighted) and I got into UOP's 0-6 program (this was like 8 years ago so keep that in mind though). That school's expensive so I ended up going to public schools for undergrad and getting a BS first. During high school I volunteered once weekly for like 2 years at a hospital and other random non-healthcare related crap. Like giga said, try volunteering in healthcare (hospital, or hospital pharmacy) to use as experience to help reinforce in your application why you wanna pursue pharmacy.

For 0-6 programs, look at naplex pass rates (http://www.nabp.net/system/rich/rich_files/rich_files/000/001/276/original/naplex-passrates-2015.pdf) and tuition cost. I thought UOP was easy to get into (plus I think applying was free! haha) and I heard the one in Massachusetts is easy to get into too.

If you don't get in a 0-6 program, you can always complete your pre-reqs in 2-3 years wherever and apply to regular pharmacy schools that don't require a BS. It'd basically be the same thing (3 years of undergrad courses for your prerequisites + 3 years accelerated pharmD program). I remember going to interviews at 19 years old but ended up not going to pharmacy school until after graduating anyway haha
 
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bacillus1

10+ Year Member
May 27, 2008
2,814
454
Status
Pharmacist
You are likely fine for getting in...just PLEASE be aware of what you're getting yourself into, as well as the fact that it's a very saturated field in terms of jobs.
 

rph3664

7+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2010
2,465
366
Status
Pharmacist
If you're still interested in a pharmacy career next summer, inquire at the local hospital about volunteering in the pharmacy. Many hospitals, especially bigger ones, have a "Youth Corps" of teenage summer volunteers. Do keep in mind that you would probably not be handling any drugs, especially controlled substances, and everything that's done there is confidential - in other words, what happens there stays there. You would probably do filing, deliveries, and other things that do not involve patient care.

You have an excellent GPA. Keep up the good work!
 
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OP
T
Jul 31, 2016
13
1
Status
Non-Student
I don't have any specific answers to your questions. My guess is that keeping your GPA up is more important than stacking up on APs, as long as you still have a few AP classes under your belt. I'm also not sure how you came to the conclusion that your GPA will drop so much if you take all science and math AP classes - as long as you spread them out through the next 3 years of high school, and have good time management skills, it should be fairly manageable.

Volunteer in health care settings - pharmacies, hospitals, etc. Make sure to shadow a number of different fields (nursing, medicine, pharmacy, even dental). It will help you a lot, not just into getting into school, but in better articulating why you want to do pharmacy specifically when you interview for pharmacy schools.

I am extremely curious... What big goals do you have for pharmacy?
Thx for the response But the big goals I have are just being a clinical pharmist in a children's hospital not really big goals I know but kids are what I want to help as I get older and a doctor is to much for me (the work hours + school)
 

lord999

Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Feb 20, 2002
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2,819
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Status
Pharmacist, Academic Administration
Hello! im a 10th grader, and i know im young but i have big goals in pharmacy. i wanted to know what my chances are and what i need to do more of or do differently as im still young i still have tons of time to reach my goal and you guys advice will really help me so plzzz! respond! STATS: 9th grade Finished with 4.1 weighted
10 grade expecting the same
a little of volunteer hours
2nd in conference wrestler
should i take all science and math ap classes or only a few as if i take all my gpa will drop to about 3.5 but if i only take 4 i will probably Finnish high school with a 3.9 or 3.8. were should i volunteer at? also what are some decent schools to go to for 0-6 and what are some reasonable easier schools to get into?
also can you guys plzzzz list some of yr high school stats for getting into the 0-6 program.
Speaking from the perspective of a successful 0-6 (and possible 0-3/4 in my case), it's actually the junior year that's going to be the most important. The competitive profile hasn't changed all that much from when I applied:

Reasonable overall GPA:
3.6+ (recalculated on a strict 4.0 basis, none of this 5.0 out of 4 business, so a B on in an AP class would be a 3 and not a 4.)

S-GPA:
3.5 (recalculated as above)

and specifically you must have taken the highest Biology and Chemistry available at your school at the time of application (this means for schools without AP/IB Chemistry and Biology, they don't get penalized) and score at least 50% A- or above. )

Specific Coursework:
Highest possible Biology and Chemistry possible at application time with only the second term of one of the classes not reported yet (meaning you cannot have both AP Bio and AP Chem your senior year).

In Trigonometry/Pre-calculus at senior year as a minimum, prefer at least Calculus AB during senior year.

Physics not necessary but Physics B weighs in your favor for 0-6, Physics B is required for 0-3/4.

Must be at full schedule by your school's count through junior year and senior first term.

Unless it's St. John's, the SAT and ACT scores have to be at least competent but not exceptional. I think the PCAT can substitute if you can take it but contact the school specifically.

If you are applying to Rutgers, you must have actual pharmacy or healthcare experience and not plain hospital volunteer unless you can argue that it's not possible due to the way your state works.

If you are going for the true direct admission (meaning straight into the professional program like I did, every science prerequisite including physics and statistics if required except one semester of one class must have the grade reported at time of application. This is usually OChem and it was in my case. If you are going the 0-3/4 route, you must take AP Bio and AP Chem or its university equivalents by the end of your junior year and Organic Chemistry by the end of your senior to qualify. This was extreme enough that a couple of my classmates got their GED and went to the community college and/or university at 16-17 to finish off the prerequisites.

Must be able to communicate in a mature mien and not obviously be under parental pressure to take the major.
 
OP
T
Jul 31, 2016
13
1
Status
Non-Student
Speaking from the perspective of a successful 0-6 (and possible 0-3/4 in my case), it's actually the junior year that's going to be the most important. The competitive profile hasn't changed all that much from when I applied:

Reasonable overall GPA:
3.6+ (recalculated on a strict 4.0 basis, none of this 5.0 out of 4 business, so a B on in an AP class would be a 3 and not a 4.)

S-GPA:
3.5 (recalculated as above)

and specifically you must have taken the highest Biology and Chemistry available at your school at the time of application (this means for schools without AP/IB Chemistry and Biology, they don't get penalized) and score at least 50% A- or above. )

Specific Coursework:
Highest possible Biology and Chemistry possible at application time with only the second term of one of the classes not reported yet (meaning you cannot have both AP Bio and AP Chem your senior year).

In Trigonometry/Pre-calculus at senior year as a minimum, prefer at least Calculus AB during senior year.

Physics not necessary but Physics B weighs in your favor for 0-6, Physics B is required for 0-3/4.

Must be at full schedule by your school's count through junior year and senior first term.

Unless it's St. John's, the SAT and ACT scores have to be at least competent but not exceptional. I think the PCAT can substitute if you can take it but contact the school specifically.

If you are applying to Rutgers, you must have actual pharmacy or healthcare experience and not plain hospital volunteer unless you can argue that it's not possible due to the way your state works.

If you are going for the true direct admission (meaning straight into the professional program like I did, every science prerequisite including physics and statistics if required except one semester of one class must have the grade reported at time of application. This is usually OChem and it was in my case. If you are going the 0-3/4 route, you must take AP Bio and AP Chem or its university equivalents by the end of your junior year and Organic Chemistry by the end of your senior to qualify. This was extreme enough that a couple of my classmates got their GED and went to the community college and/or university at 16-17 to finish off the prerequisites.

Must be able to communicate in a mature mien and not obviously be under parental pressure to take the major.
Thx a lot! Sorry but what's a 0-3/4??
 
OP
T
Jul 31, 2016
13
1
Status
Non-Student
Anyone else. What's my chance of getting in? Also what's easier to get into pharm. school or dentist school?
 

BidingMyTime

Lost Shaker Of Salt
10+ Year Member
Oct 2, 2006
3,667
2,741
Illinois
Status
Pharmacist
pharmacy school is far easier to get into. Assuming you get a decent score on your SAT/ACT and present yourself as a normal person during the interview, I think its extremely likely you will be accepted. But I would recommend taking all the science and math classes you can.
 
OP
T
Jul 31, 2016
13
1
Status
Non-Student
Anyone else on advice what to do were to go. Your high school stats... Anything
 

winnguyen

5+ Year Member
Jun 1, 2013
51
14
Status
Pharmacist
My advice would be to get a part time job as a pharmacy technician or cashier in a retail pharmacy like Walgreens or CVS or Walmart to get exposure to the pharmacy environment. There is a reasonably high probability that you would spend every working day of your career as a pharmacist working in retail.
 

rph3664

7+ Year Member
Jul 5, 2010
2,465
366
Status
Pharmacist
I graduated from high school in 1981, so taking high school classes for college credit wasn't an option. I also did not start on my degree until I was 24, and took my first 2 years at a community college. I did attend college briefly, taking liberal arts classes because I didn't know what I wanted to major in after taking a gap year (30 years before it had a name LOL).

The school I attended was either a 1/4 or 2/3 program depending on how you scheduled your classes. It's now a 2/4 Pharm.D. school, with MPH, MBA, and MHA option. (Master of public health, business administration, or health administration).
 
Aug 21, 2016
1
0
Speaking from the perspective of a successful 0-6 (and possible 0-3/4 in my case), it's actually the junior year that's going to be the most important. The competitive profile hasn't changed all that much from when I applied:

Reasonable overall GPA:
3.6+ (recalculated on a strict 4.0 basis, none of this 5.0 out of 4 business, so a B on in an AP class would be a 3 and not a 4.)

S-GPA:
3.5 (recalculated as above)

and specifically you must have taken the highest Biology and Chemistry available at your school at the time of application (this means for schools without AP/IB Chemistry and Biology, they don't get penalized) and score at least 50% A- or above. )

Specific Coursework:
Highest possible Biology and Chemistry possible at application time with only the second term of one of the classes not reported yet (meaning you cannot have both AP Bio and AP Chem your senior year).

In Trigonometry/Pre-calculus at senior year as a minimum, prefer at least Calculus AB during senior year.

Physics not necessary but Physics B weighs in your favor for 0-6, Physics B is required for 0-3/4.

Must be at full schedule by your school's count through junior year and senior first term.

Unless it's St. John's, the SAT and ACT scores have to be at least competent but not exceptional. I think the PCAT can substitute if you can take it but contact the school specifically.

If you are applying to Rutgers, you must have actual pharmacy or healthcare experience and not plain hospital volunteer unless you can argue that it's not possible due to the way your state works.

If you are going for the true direct admission (meaning straight into the professional program like I did, every science prerequisite including physics and statistics if required except one semester of one class must have the grade reported at time of application. This is usually OChem and it was in my case. If you are going the 0-3/4 route, you must take AP Bio and AP Chem or its university equivalents by the end of your junior year and Organic Chemistry by the end of your senior to qualify. This was extreme enough that a couple of my classmates got their GED and went to the community college and/or university at 16-17 to finish off the prerequisites.

Must be able to communicate in a mature mien and not obviously be under parental pressure to take the major.
I'm going to be a senior next year, and I'm planning to take BioAP. I know you said that a person applying for 0-6 must have taken the highest level of chem and bio in their school but just to clarify does that mean I have no chance at all if I don't take ChemAP?
 

lord999

Moderator Emeritus
15+ Year Member
Feb 20, 2002
2,736
2,819
DC
Status
Pharmacist, Academic Administration
No, it's still a good chance, but it's better if you had if it were offered as Chem is a prerequisite for more of the higher classes (Organic, Analytical, Biochemistry) than Biology. I also don't recommend anyone to take Analytical/Instrumental Analysis the same year as their Organic Chemistry unless they want to live in the laboratory. If AP Chemistry is offered, you should consider taking it. If you don't have it offered, the highest chemistry offered is the best you can do.

Even if you don't need it for graduation and can fit it into your senior schedule but don't want to take the grade hit, consider asking for audit or P/F for that class if you have a booked senior year.

That being said, you must have had logarithms (probably Algebra II) before you walk into AP Chemistry for Reaction Kinetics and classical Henderson-Hasselbach, so if you don't have the math prerequisites, it's probably not advisable. Then again, it's unlikely you'll be able to stuff everything your sophomore year of college if you are that far deficient in your math prerequisites.

The required sciences for pharmacy almost always are (semester system and when I say "for majors" I mean the ones for that sequence as a true major in that program area):
(16 credits/semester hours)
General Chemistry I and II with Laboratory (depending on the school, for Chem majors and not the lesser Bio majors classes)
Organic Chemistry I and II with Laboratory (depending on the school, for Chem majors and not the lesser Bio majors classes) - GChem prerequisite
Physics I and II (Algebra-based at least but some schools require Calculus-Based) with Laboratory
Biology I and II for Biology Majors

Probable Requirements:
(anywhere between 16 and 24 semester hours)
Anatomy and Physiology I and II (laboratory is required for some, not all schools)
Biochemistry for Chemistry Majors
Microbiology for Biology Majors (do not take a survey or for nurses class as it usually does not count)
Analytical Chemistry (some schools) GChem and usually Calculus prerequisite if the Skoog book is used
Calculus (the variant depends on the pharmacy school, but you have to be able to deal with standard integration by parts so Calculus AB is normally the high school version). You should take the Calculus I/II sequence for math or engineering majors if all possible.
Physiology for Biology Majors* (you usually get out of the first year pharmacy class if you have that particualr sequence)

If you are going to use the two years of preprofessional, that's a fairly painful schedule especially if you are math deficient and have to spend the freshman year on the math prerequisite if Physics has to be Calculus-based (you should not take Calculus based physics at the same time as the first semester of Calculus or you're going to fail). That's why the recommendation for a 0-6 is such that eliminating any prerequisites that you can helps you out. But for pharmacy school, know that the two or three Chemistry classes (GChem, OChem, and possibly AChem/BChem) need to be fairly solid scores (no lower than a B) to be considered. I usually say that for a competitive application, the chemistry classes average needs to be an A- and no score lower than a B.

For AP acceptance, almost all schools default to the mother university's policies for undergraduate. For most schools in the Midwest or West, a 4 is the minimum that is allowed for credits (I know some schools that require a 5 for the Chemistry and Calculus classes for it to count), 3 is considered insufficient. If you don't think you test that well, consider trying for dual enrollment or something like that.