National Register Health Service Psychologist (HSP) Credential

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AbnormalPsych

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For those of you who have looked into this, or done this, is it worth the process and annual fees? What benefits are the most important to you?

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“Free” CEs. Some states recognize it.

It’s basically the CPQ, before that was a thing. And now it’s in the books. And they give out ECP “scholarships”, where the first year is free.
 
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Does anyone know if this is the same HSP Credential that some state licensing boards offer for an extra fee? Or is this one somehow better?
 
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Biggest benefit I can see is that it might expedite licensing in some jurisdictions (e.g., with this credential, you don't have to submit original proof of internship/postdoc training). Makes less work for you, but not really a whole lot less. I fail to see how this speeds up the work of the actual board and admin staff reviewing your documents, though. That's a "check the box if proof included in app" step. The really time constraint is actually getting enough people together to review apps, rather than apps being too complicated to review. It seems like they are trying to claim it offers more license portability, but until 50 state legislatures change their regs, at best it just makes the application process (which you only have to do once in your lifetime per state) a half hour quicker for you. CEU offerings, insurance discounts may make it worthwhile, but I don't see it.
 
I am a member and I am planning on moving states within the next year so I can report back on the ease of transfer when that happens. As an early career professional, I do not qualify for CPQ making the HSP credential potentially worth it. I do think the CE content is good for whatever that is worth.
 
As long as you qualify for the CPQ, is there any incremental usefulness of the HSP credential besides some free CEs?
There are some weird states that either require it or recognize it or something. It’s why you see some psychologists with HSP after their name. It’s some state thing. I had to ask about it, in some forensic case.
 
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There are some weird states that either require it or recognize it or something. It’s why you see some psychologists with HSP after their name. It’s some state thing. I had to ask about it, in some forensic case.
In my state (MA) they either still or recently stopped licensing psychologist who were not clinical/counseling. These psychologist were not licensed to provide therapy, supervise, etc. (for example, my cognitive psychology professor had this type of license). Psychologists who are licensed to provide therapy, supervision, etc.- due to their specific clinical/counseling education, training, experience, have an HSP designation on their license. I honestly haven't seen or heard o f a non-HSP licensed psychologist in decades. It has no relationship to the HSP credential that is the topic of this post.
 
In my state (MA) they either still or recently stopped licensing psychologist who were not clinical/counseling. These psychologist were not licensed to provide therapy, supervise, etc. (for example, my cognitive psychology professor had this type of license). Psychologists who are licensed to provide therapy, supervision, etc.- due to their specific clinical/counseling education, training, experience, have an HSP designation on their license. I honestly haven't seen or heard o f a non-HSP licensed psychologist in decades. It has no relationship to the HSP credential that is the topic of this post.
I know Indiana has something about psychologists using HSP after their name. I thought it was just to notate their association with the National Register.
 
I know Indiana has something about psychologists using HSP after their name. I thought it was just to notate their association with the National Register.
Could be. From the National HSP Register Website re: Indiana-

"In process. The board voted to approve the National Register, and is in the process of making the necessary law/regulation/rule changes. We cannot guarantee when the provisions will be activated, but we will update this site as soon as the changes are implemented."

I don't really know what that means. Maybe they would just give you license eligibility if you have the National HSP credential? I'd bet a few dollars that you'd still have to submit some type of application that would get bogged down in the same processes that delay other applicants.

My actual license from MA say "Psychologist Provider." My CT license just says "Psychologist." In MA, the National HSP credential allows new licensure applicants to "Waives documentation of internship experience and postdoctoral experience" as long as you have "5 years of practice experience." CT does not seem to care at all about National HSP credentialling. CT did waive documentation of internship/post-doc etc. for me when I applied because I was already licensed in MA and had been practicing for over 5 years. I just don't see how this National HSP would really "expedite" any application process or lead to increased portability. Realistically, how many states are people going to be licensed in? Maybe 2-3 max. I'd guess the mode is 1 state, particularly if you aren't in an area like me where you can get to three other states in less than 30 minutes, and two more in less than an hour. As I mentioned before, real licensure portability isn't a thing until each state changes their regulations. That would- literally- require an act of congress (state congress, but you get the point). This National HSP register thing seems questionable at this (outside of CEUs and those types of opportunities. This is especially true if you are already licensed somewhere and have been practicing for awhile, as you are likely to get the same "expedited application" benefits as a result of that anyways. If more states grant licensure eligibility base on National HSP credentialling AND that actually speeds up the actual process (and not just mean that there is less the applicant has to submit before being subjected to the same board processes), it MAY be something for new career folks to look into.
 
My guess is that they basically did the CPQ thing in the 1980s: created some way of banking credentials that mimicked licensure requirements, lobbied various states to accept the HSP credential in lieu of applicants submitting all the originals, had success in a bunch of states, and then somehow fell out of favor. Just a guess.
 
I feel like National Register was a bigger thing 10 years ago before the push for board certification and competed with CPQ. I feel like the telehealth passport and board certification are currently more relevant. We will see if the field can get it together in another 10 years and actually establish a single entity, service, board, etc instead of splitting up and competing with each other. My bet is no, we will be onto the next thing.
 
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I feel like National Register was a bigger thing 10 years ago before the push for board certification and competed with CPQ. I feel like the telehealth passport and board certification are currently more relevant. We will see if the field can get it together in another 10 years and actually establish a single entity, service, board, etc instead of splitting up and competing with each other. My bet is no, we will be onto the next thing.

Well, the CPQ/IPC/EPassport/PSYPACT are all affiliated with ASPPB, so I'd assume that would be the entity with the biggest market share and the most logical player to keep it all under one roof.
 
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I feel like National Register was a bigger thing 10 years ago before the push for board certification and competed with CPQ. I feel like the telehealth passport and board certification are currently more relevant. We will see if the field can get it together in another 10 years and actually establish a single entity, service, board, etc instead of splitting up and competing with each other. My bet is no, we will be onto the next thing.
I've actually seen the opposite trend in my other area of practice (ABA). There used to be only national credentialling (the BCBA) that was sufficient/necessary to bill insurance as an independent practitioner. Within the past 5 or so years, states have adopted ABA licensure regulations and set up boards. You now have to be licensed as an ABA practioner in MA to provide services (with some exceptions, including being a licensed psychologist with appropriate training/experience). Initially most states grandfathered in the BCBA credential, granting licensure with proof of the BCBA. That's typically been phased out, and you need to show appropriate education, experience, etc. I did the grandfathering. Funny thing is, though I've done ABA professionally for almost 30 years, have published in ABA journals, teach in masters and doctorate ABA programs, did an ABA related dissertation and chair several other ABA dissertation committees, etc., I would likely not meet the standards for ABA licensure without the grandfathering, as I do not have the formal coursework. I was able to get the BCBA credential through a portfolio review process, where 10 years post ph.d. you can be eligible by demonstrating a history of clinical work, research, and teaching in lieu of formal education (which was not really an easily avaliable thing when I was was doing my book learnin'.

I think states want that control and-maybe- the licensure money (though it's not really that much on the whole). In the case of ABA, there was some good grassroots lobbying for licensure at the state level. Not sure that level of dedication or- more likely- organization is there for a national credential in psychology. Even with things like ABPP boarding, if not having boarding doesn't get in the way of billing for services, what really does it gain me other than some prestige from the select few who even know what those initials mean. It certainly has never been difficult to find a good job without it.
 
In my state (MA) they either still or recently stopped licensing psychologist who were not clinical/counseling. These psychologist were not licensed to provide therapy, supervise, etc. (for example, my cognitive psychology professor had this type of license). Psychologists who are licensed to provide therapy, supervision, etc.- due to their specific clinical/counseling education, training, experience, have an HSP designation on their license. I honestly haven't seen or heard o f a non-HSP licensed psychologist in decades. It has no relationship to the HSP credential that is the topic of this post.

This is closer to what I was wondering. I've seen psychologists with the HSP designation on their license, but am unclear if its the National Register or just something state specific. If it's the latter I'm not exactly sure what it does.
 
This is closer to what I was wondering. I've seen psychologists with the HSP designation on their license, but am unclear if its the National Register or just something state specific. If it's the latter I'm not exactly sure what it does.
Licenses are currently issued by states, so it's a state specific designation to indicate that the licensee can provide clinical services to the citizens of that state.
 
Back in the 1980’s the National Register was pretty prestigious and registration involved some significant hoop jumping (- all pre personal computing conveniences). It was, AFAIK, the only vehicle for credential banking and very much facilitated licensure portability as well as getting accepted by insurance. It offered a national provider directory for referral purposes and the designation of HSP to indicate verified clinical training and supervised experience. If I remember correctly, info about CPQ began arriving in the early 2000’s and was an alternative to NR. Over the years I've been licensed in several States and NR membership certainly made that easier - hard to imagine trying to get internship records 30+ years later! It's served me well, the CEU's have been good but I'm not sure what additional benefits it has to offer any more.
 
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I received a scholarship on internship which waived the fee and gives me a 7 year membership. I think it’s worth it from that angle. I haven’t needed the CEs for licensure yet so I can’t speak to whether it’s worth it to pay full or reduced price. It was appealing to me because it’s a more condensed credentials bank than ASPPB and it indicates how each states’ licensing board uses the information we provide to National Register when trying to move states. I ran into issues banking with ASPPB because of how they delineated courses and being unsure what qualifies as an “individual differences” course. Also, needing attestations from each practicum supervisor and even college advisor verification was a huge hassle. Most are not longer in those positions and I couldn’t reach anyone to verify in their stead. Maybe this is showing how green I am, but it seems like more hassle than it’s worth right now.
 
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Licenses are currently issued by states, so it's a state specific designation to indicate that the licensee can provide clinical services to the citizens of that state.

Hmmm..... well in states I've seen this in psychologists have a choice of getting the HSP or not getting it. So if getting it indicates one can provide clinical services, what exactly does not getting it mean the psychologist would do?
 
Hmmm..... well in states I've seen this in psychologists have a choice of getting the HSP or not getting it. So if getting it indicates one can provide clinical services, what exactly does not getting it mean the psychologist would do?
I can only really comment on MA, where I'm not really sure what benefit would be offered by a non-HSP license. I'm not even totally sure it's still an option here. There was a faculty colleague of mine in the predoc internship I worked at who had a non-HSP license. He provided supervision to two interns one year. A few years later, when they applied for licensure, they were denied as his supervision didn't count. He (and I think maybe the program- I had left by then) were fined, and the formal interns had to make-up all those supervision hours.
 
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I received a scholarship on internship which waived the fee and gives me a 7 year membership. I think it’s worth it from that angle. I haven’t needed the CEs for licensure yet so I can’t speak to whether it’s worth it to pay full or reduced price. It was appealing to me because it’s a more condensed credentials bank than ASPPB and it indicates how each states’ licensing board uses the information we provide to National Register when trying to move states. I ran into issues banking with ASPPB because of how they delineated courses and being unsure what qualifies as an “individual differences” course. Also, needing attestations from each practicum supervisor and even college advisor verification was a huge hassle. Most are not longer in those positions and I couldn’t reach anyone to verify in their stead. Maybe this is showing how green I am, but it seems like more hassle than it’s worth right
Check their website for information on how it might be beneficial in any state you could imagine working in (and any nearby states, just in case). Then check the license application processes in those states (including procedures for getting a license if you already have one in another state). It could be worth it to only have to gather and submit all that info once. Realistically, most of us don't hold licenses in more than 1 state. In my case, my second state license (CT) allowed my to waive submission of some stuff (e.g. internship/postdoc documentation) because I was already licensed in another state and practicing for >5 years. This is the same benefit that most participating states waive with the national HSP credential. It would've conference mevno additional benefit with licensure portability. I currently hold 2 psych licenses, an ABA license, and national BCBA certification (all required to practice and teach what I do). I also belong to generally one national and two state professional organizations at any one time. Those costs add up. Additional membership fees for marginal benefit just aren't worth it to me.
 
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