naturally occuring metals in pure form are considered transition elements?

Smooth Operater

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According to one of kaplan's subject exam questions, naturally occuring metals in pure form are considered transition elements. Why? I though metals found in group IA and IIA are naturallay occuring metals.
 

ftown_trojan

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I think the key here is "in pure form." Usually metals in IA, IIA such as Na, K are present as salts/ions. In their pure forms, the are extremely reactive and thus unlikely to be found in nature. Correct me if I am wrong though!
 

Yellow Snow

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ftown_trojan said:
I think the key here is "in pure form." Usually metals in IA, IIA such as Na, K are present as salts/ions. In their pure forms, the are extremely reactive and thus unlikely to be found in nature. Correct me if I am wrong though!
You're right, first two groups are too reactive and not found in their pure form.
 
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