reg15

Junior Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 8, 2005
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Hi all, I have some specific questions that I would appreciate any and all comments/suggestions/feedback on any or all of my questions:

I am interested in the NAVY, as I would like to do GMO tour and save residency till after (primarily because I am interested in Neurology and residencies in Neurology do not tend to be as good in the armed services, as they shouldn’t be). I graduated from school in 2001 (so I’m already on the “older side”) and have been doing research at a hospital in Boston (I’ve already been accepted to med school).

1) Deployable vs. non-deployable billets: Are there a lot more deployable billets now (semi-wartime)?

2) What is the % of people to get their first choice of base/hospital? This application process depends on? med school scores? Rec letters? Time in service?

3) How many apply for DMO or flight surgeon? And roughly what % get one or the other?

4) During your reserve years, what is the % of people activated? During wartime? Semi-wartime (Iraq, now)? Do you have a choice of where/with what base/hopsital your activated to?

Thank you in advance for your thoughts.
-reg
 

ishii123

Member
10+ Year Member
Mar 13, 2005
78
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Status
Attending Physician
First off, expect to do a GMO, Flight Surgeon (FS), and/or Undersea Medical Officer (UMO) tour after a Navy internship. Going straight thru residency is the exception, not the rule. This is a positive to some. Negative to others. Personally, I've enjoyed being a FS for the past year.

Here's the answers to your questions:
1) Deployable vs. non-deployable billets: Are there a lot more deployable billets now (semi-wartime)?
ANSWER: All GMO, FS, and UMO billets in the Navy are deployable. In this post 9/11 era and our government's current military policies, expect to deploy. I know AT LEAST 2 Navy docs who were in "non-deployable" clinic billets that were deployed to Iraq. Deployments typically last 6 months.

2) What is the % of people to get their first choice of base/hospital? This application process depends on? med school scores? Rec letters? Time in service?
ANSWER: Most people get their 1st or 2nd choice for a Navy internship, but residency is a different story. Again, expect to do a GMO, FS, or UMO tour before starting residency...especially if you are applying for a competitive field (Radiology, Optho, Derm). GREAT STATS are important for the competitive fields. If you have poor - mediocre STATS, do not expect to get into a competitive field even if you do 5 GMO tours.

3) How many apply for DMO or flight surgeon? And roughly what % get one or the other?
ANSWER: It depends on how many apply in a given year, but I would say 80-90% of the people who apply for FS or DMO tours (aka "fun GMO tours") get in. However, it is possible to fail out of Student FS or Student DMO school, especially the physical fitness parts. If you do DMO, it is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED that you be a good swimmer, know how to scuba, do pull-ups, and otherwise be in great shape. If you do FS, be a decent swimmer.

4) During your reserve years, what is the % of people activated? During wartime? Semi-wartime (Iraq, now)? Do you have a choice of where/with what base/hopsital your activated to?
ANSWER: I do not know specifics. But honestly, there are no guarantees. If you're activated from the Reserves, they could send you to the hospital, to sea, or in the battle front w/ the Marines. They'll send you where they need you. You may have preferences, but they make the final choices.


Yes, all this stuff may sound SCARY. But this is the post 9/11 era and we are in a state of war w/ an unknown enemy. If you think you are going to live a "cush" life as a military GMO doctor, think again. Expect to lift your own 50 pound seabag (with no transport wheels), eat MRE's (taste like crap), work with primitive medical equipment, and travel to Iraq or Afghanistan during your GMO, FS, or UMO tour. And know that Iraq and Afghanistan are war zones and dangerous :eek: :scared:

Overall, I believe the whole experience has humbled me and made me a better person. In the end, it has made me appreciate my freedoms and gifts in life. I'm a better officer and doctor for it. These experiences will be something I look upon with pride and accomplishment. But I'm not going to lie to you, it's tough and rigorous. Military life is not for some people, especially white-collar doctors. Do your Research, research, research...know what you are getting into...especially in this post 9//11 era...don't believe the recruiters...talk to past and present military doctors.

Good Luck!