VWBeetlegrl

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I have been reading through the Navy HPSP threads and have read some things about the Navy but have gotten a wide variety of responses. I know many of the responses have been from various specialties.

Today I talked to a Family Medicine Residency Director/Naval Recruiter about doing FP through Navy HPSP. I realize it's never as good as anyone will try to make it sound, but it didn't sound too bad to me. I have a few questions that are more specific to doing FP. I am currently an M2 but I'm about 99% that Family Medicine is what I definitely want to do.

1. Are FP residents trained well in procedures and Ob/gyn?

2. He told me that they are trying to phase out doing a tour after your intern year and postpone until the end of residency because most people don't want to do that. I read somewhat that this may/may not be happening in reality. As of now, what is the most likely outcome for FP resident after the intern year?

3. The recruiter said I would owe 3 years, which is basically one tour and I would live somewhere like Japan, Guam, etc. Would doing this mean I was on base overseas for 3 years, or would I go on deployment in addition to that?

4. I grew up with my Dad in the Navy so I'm somewhat familiar with military life. I'm single and not planning to get married anytime soon, so this is rather appealing for short-term, but who knows what could change in the next 5 or 6 years. Money does play some role because I am concerned about affording the rest of my schooling, but it's not the only factor by any means. I would be proud to serve my country and I do enjoy experiencing other places and other cultures. I realize nothing is a guarantee. So what is the general opinion of FPs who were trained by the Navy? I would (planning now) leave once I fulfilled my time unless for some reason I really wanted to stay in. Is this a reasonable approach for family med?
 

IgD

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2. He told me that they are trying to phase out doing a tour after your intern year and postpone until the end of residency because most people don't want to do that. I read somewhat that this may/may not be happening in reality. As of now, what is the most likely outcome for FP resident after the intern year?

Isn't it interesting that they can't tell you exactly what will happen in writing for an issue as important as that?

3. The recruiter said I would owe 3 years, which is basically one tour and I would live somewhere like Japan, Guam, etc. Would doing this mean I was on base overseas for 3 years, or would I go on deployment in addition to that?

I'm a little confused. Are you taking a 2 year or 3 year HPSP scholarhip?

Suppose you had a 3-year scholarship and did a 2-year GMO tour. I think you would end up paying back a total of 4 years after FP residency. The first two would be the GMO tour. Then you could complete the FP residency (2 years). After that you would owe two years for the residency.

4. I grew up with my Dad in the Navy so I'm somewhat familiar with military life. I'm single and not planning to get married anytime soon, so this is rather appealing for short-term, but who knows what could change in the next 5 or 6 years. Money does play some role because I am concerned about affording the rest of my schooling, but it's not the only factor by any means. I would be proud to serve my country and I do enjoy experiencing other places and other cultures. I realize nothing is a guarantee. So what is the general opinion of FPs who were trained by the Navy? I would (planning now) leave once I fulfilled my time unless for some reason I really wanted to stay in. Is this a reasonable approach for family med?

NavyFP could tell you more about the procedures. Navy Medicine is pretty heavy on OBGYN so I don't think there is a big opportunity for obstetrics.

Does the Navy still force FPs into 15 minute appointments? I remember my wife was mad that a Navy FP told her he could only address a single issue during the appointment and that she would have to make another for a second issue.
 
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notdeadyet

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If you're down to 2 years of medical school, I can't see how FAP wouldn't be the better deal financially.
Agreed. There are stickies that discuss FAP. If you have two more years, it's probably a better bet.

Besides which, if you haven't done clinical rotations yet, there is a very strong possibility that you will find other specialties that suit you better. If you do surgery rotations and decide thoracic surgery is your dream gig, having already signed up for HPSP for two years of med school would be a very big bummer.
 

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I have been reading through the Navy HPSP threads and have read some things about the Navy but have gotten a wide variety of responses. I know many of the responses have been from various specialties.

Today I talked to a Family Medicine Residency Director/Naval Recruiter about doing FP through Navy HPSP. I realize it's never as good as anyone will try to make it sound, but it didn't sound too bad to me. I have a few questions that are more specific to doing FP. I am currently an M2 but I'm about 99% that Family Medicine is what I definitely want to do.

1. Are FP residents trained well in procedures and Ob/gyn?

2. He told me that they are trying to phase out doing a tour after your intern year and postpone until the end of residency because most people don't want to do that. I read somewhat that this may/may not be happening in reality. As of now, what is the most likely outcome for FP resident after the intern year?

3. The recruiter said I would owe 3 years, which is basically one tour and I would live somewhere like Japan, Guam, etc. Would doing this mean I was on base overseas for 3 years, or would I go on deployment in addition to that?

4. I grew up with my Dad in the Navy so I'm somewhat familiar with military life. I'm single and not planning to get married anytime soon, so this is rather appealing for short-term, but who knows what could change in the next 5 or 6 years. Money does play some role because I am concerned about affording the rest of my schooling, but it's not the only factor by any means. I would be proud to serve my country and I do enjoy experiencing other places and other cultures. I realize nothing is a guarantee. So what is the general opinion of FPs who were trained by the Navy? I would (planning now) leave once I fulfilled my time unless for some reason I really wanted to stay in. Is this a reasonable approach for family med?

ActiveDutyMD junior is that you!?? You sound like you are me posting this in 1998. I thought I wanted to do FP (I would have said I was 99% sure in fact.) I was worried about med school debt, but loved my country and was looking for an adventure. I didn't know anything about a GMO tour, the recruiter said something to the effect that 95% get what they want and I just knew I would be in the "top 95%" without much trouble. I knew there was no "guarantee."

If you are already planning to get out after your commitment, it is unlikely you'll be happy during your commitment. And I guarantee you'll be unhappy from July to December of your MSIV year as you sweat out the military match, and maybe even after that.

If you are lucky enough to get stationed overseas, be advised that you will also be deployed to hellholes from that location. There is no such thing as being "forward deployed" anymore. It used to be that AF docs assigned to Germany or England or Japan didn't deploy. No longer. Ask your recruiter to get you in touch with several real live O-3 Navy FPs and talk to them about your decision. They are the only ones who can give you good advice. If you can't find them through your recruiter, just start calling up big Navy hospitals and ask to be connected to the clinics. This decision is that important. While you're at it, ask for some email addresses for Navy O-3 FPs who are currently deployed. You want to know what it is like? Ask those who are there right now.

Since you're already an M2, it's too late to do HPSP. Why not hold off, go through the match, and apply for the FAP program after you get into a civilian residency that will give you the OB and procedural experience you're looking for? Why take a 2 year scholarship with a 3 year commitment?

You're about to F--- Up your life. Please consider this your warning from your future self.

P.S. Here's a note from your future husband and kids: "Don't do it honey! We can pay back the loans, I just want you to be happy"..."Mommy, why are you leaving us to go to the desert again? How long is 8 months, is that like the amount of time I was in your belly before I came out?"
 
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Does the Navy still force FPs into 15 minute appointments? I remember my wife was mad that a Navy FP told her he could only address a single issue during the appointment and that she would have to make another for a second issue.

That's FP everywhere and has nothing to do with the Navy.
 

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I have been reading through the Navy HPSP threads and have read some things about the Navy but have gotten a wide variety of responses. I know many of the responses have been from various specialties.

Today I talked to a Family Medicine Residency Director/Naval Recruiter about doing FP through Navy HPSP. I realize it's never as good as anyone will try to make it sound, but it didn't sound too bad to me. I have a few questions that are more specific to doing FP. I am currently an M2 but I'm about 99% that Family Medicine is what I definitely want to do.

1. Are FP residents trained well in procedures and Ob/gyn?

2. He told me that they are trying to phase out doing a tour after your intern year and postpone until the end of residency because most people don't want to do that. I read somewhat that this may/may not be happening in reality. As of now, what is the most likely outcome for FP resident after the intern year?

3. The recruiter said I would owe 3 years, which is basically one tour and I would live somewhere like Japan, Guam, etc. Would doing this mean I was on base overseas for 3 years, or would I go on deployment in addition to that?

4. I grew up with my Dad in the Navy so I'm somewhat familiar with military life. I'm single and not planning to get married anytime soon, so this is rather appealing for short-term, but who knows what could change in the next 5 or 6 years. Money does play some role because I am concerned about affording the rest of my schooling, but it's not the only factor by any means. I would be proud to serve my country and I do enjoy experiencing other places and other cultures. I realize nothing is a guarantee. So what is the general opinion of FPs who were trained by the Navy? I would (planning now) leave once I fulfilled my time unless for some reason I really wanted to stay in. Is this a reasonable approach for family med?
1. Navy family medicine will train you to do many different types of proceedures. Even as an MSIV I've been able to do just about whatever I wanted on rotations at the NH's. If you want an OB heavy residency, you would be hard-pressed to get more exposure than you would at Camp Lejeune or Camp Pendelton. Jax does quite well in that department as well, Pensacola sends their residents to Lejeune for their OB rotations. I'm not sure about Bremerton.

2. This is the first year that Navy FM will allow residents the opportunity for straight through contracts. With that said, if you are a good resident and really want to continue your training without doing a GMO tour, you do have an excellent shot even without the guarantee of a straight contract, especially at Lejeune and Jax.

3. You will have the opportunity to go overseas after residency, but those have historically been more competitive. You could have many different possibilities from ship duty, clinics, flight surgery, and the green side. It is impossible to say exactly which spots will be available at the time you complete residency.

Good Luck, anything more specific you can PM me and I'll try to answer questions to the best of my knowledge or as stated above, NavyFP is an even better resource.
 
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IgD

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You're about to F--- Up your life. Please consider this your warning from your future self.

P.S. Here's a note from your future husband and kids: "Don't do it honey! We can pay back the loans, I just want you to be happy"..."Mommy, why are you leaving us to go to the desert again? How long is 8 months, is that like the amount of time I was in your belly before I came out?"

It sounds like you are doing through a dark time. I'll keep you in my thoughts over Thanksgiving. Keep up the fight. Maybe we should start sending people care packages on here:)
 

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It sounds like you are doing through a dark time. I'll keep you in my thoughts over Thanksgiving. Keep up the fight. Maybe we should start sending people care packages on here:)

Things are actually great relatively speaking. But every now and then, what a poster says just reminds me an awful lot of the way I used to think.

Although I am working Thanksgiving and the two days after....but that's not a military medicine issue, hell I made the schedule.
 

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Maybe we should start sending people care packages on here:)

That might create an issue with the whole anonymity thing this forum has going...or we could send e-care-packages full of dancing emoticons to boost morale. :banana: I'm sure a dancing banana would take away some of the anguish of a year long deployment............... :+D
 

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That might create an issue with the whole anonymity thing this forum has going...

I'm not sure we really have that much anonymity on this forum. At least I don't, I've had too many people stop to ask me. There just aren't that many big, Navy, Peds guys. . . .

I should have been TinyAFGeriatricsGal
 

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I'm not sure we really have that much anonymity on this forum. At least I don't, I've had too many people stop to ask me. There just aren't that many big, Navy, Peds guys. . . .

I should have been TinyAFGeriatricsGal

I've been wondering for a long time if you were the MS4 that rotated through the NMCP ward my second year who bore a striking resemblance to a certain Pixar cartoon character...

I second the notion that there is far less anonymity on this board than some realize :)
 

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Indeed - you just figured that out, J? :laugh:
I think BNPG was asking if me was me in an old old thread!
...his resemblance IS rather striking however...
 
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My 2 cents.

I have been reading through the Navy HPSP threads and have read some things about the Navy but have gotten a wide variety of responses. I know many of the responses have been from various specialties.

Today I talked to a Family Medicine Residency Director/Naval Recruiter about doing FP through Navy HPSP. I realize it's never as good as anyone will try to make it sound, but it didn't sound too bad to me. I have a few questions that are more specific to doing FP. I am currently an M2 but I'm about 99% that Family Medicine is what I definitely want to do.

1. Are FP residents trained well in procedures and Ob/gyn?
Absolutely. When I left residency, I was trained to do all sorts of lumps and bumps, vasectomies, colposcopies, D+Cs, and Flex sigs. Some friends have been C-section qualified, but I did not choose to go that far. Lots of vaginal deliveries including suction and forcep deliveries.


2. He told me that they are trying to phase out doing a tour after your intern year and postpone until the end of residency because most people don't want to do that. I read somewhat that this may/may not be happening in reality. As of now, what is the most likely outcome for FP resident after the intern year?
If you go FP, you will most likely go straight through. After residency, it is likely you will spend 2 years with an operational unit.

3. The recruiter said I would owe 3 years, which is basically one tour and I would live somewhere like Japan, Guam, etc. Would doing this mean I was on base overseas for 3 years, or would I go on deployment in addition to that?
You can deploy from almost anywhere. Hard to say if you will be immediately sent overseas. It depends on what is open when you graduate.

4. I grew up with my Dad in the Navy so I'm somewhat familiar with military life. I'm single and not planning to get married anytime soon, so this is rather appealing for short-term, but who knows what could change in the next 5 or 6 years. Money does play some role because I am concerned about affording the rest of my schooling, but it's not the only factor by any means. I would be proud to serve my country and I do enjoy experiencing other places and other cultures. I realize nothing is a guarantee. So what is the general opinion of FPs who were trained by the Navy? I would (planning now) leave once I fulfilled my time unless for some reason I really wanted to stay in. Is this a reasonable approach for family med?
Most who enter do so with the idea of completing their time and getting out. Many of my friends have done just that. All who have gotten out have had no problem finding a position in the area they wanted.
 

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I am applying for both the Air Force and Navy HPSP. Anyone able to comment on which service is better for families? i.e., can your family go with you on year-long deployments etc.? Thanks
BK

That is the funniest post I've seen on here in a while. If your family COULD go to Iraq with you, would you take them?

Being in the service is a family affair, in that all family members make great sacrifices, but keeping the family together isn't exactly a priority.
 

AF_PedsBoy

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I have GOT to stop humoring the crazies. I saw a woman for follow up about 12 hours after she got out of the "ER," for pelvic pain. The 12 hours might have been a tip off. The exorbitant amount of testing as a result of seven different complaints might have been a tip off. However what SHOULD have been a tip off is when halfway through the appointment she said, "My grandfather, aunts and uncles have a history of leukemia, lymphoma, liver, uterine, and ovarian cancer and I want to be screened for them." By this time I slowly started to realize this was a futile appointment, but like an idiot I dutifully went over the pelvic ultrasound, CBC, smear, LFTs and why she didn't need it. Around the time she asked for the third value I should have realized she wanted every single lab value. And why they were okay. If I had been swifter I would have told her to stop by the front desk and they would give her a copy of the labs. Or that they were normal "because this number is between this number... yes over here... and this number... these are normal. What? Nope, no other explanation, that's how us doctors know if these numbers bad or not. Yes, lab good. Me like lab." :mad:

When I had read the note previously I was laughing because my friend had gone through a list, like, "Patient feels warm in room when heat is up high most likely because of environmental factors" and "Patient tired likely because she is waking up every two hours to feed the baby." I would not have been laughing if I had known she had totally ignored everything he had told her the night before and wanted me to evaluate her again. In my 15 minute follow up slot.

I tend to feel all warm and fuzzy towards first time moms and give them a little more leeway because, well, they're nervous and sleep deprived. However this went beyond ...way beyond... I pity the Ob doing the follow up in two weeks...
 

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That is the funniest post I've seen on here in a while. If your family COULD go to Iraq with you, would you take them?

Being in the service is a family affair, in that all family members make great sacrifices, but keeping the family together isn't exactly a priority.

Well, obviously Iraq isn't the only place where military physicians are stationed, and I can see that in these current times one would find it safe to assume that this is where the majority of military docs will be sent. However, I am talking about naval and air force bases around the globe. Or when I said "deployment," does this term strictly apply to the war effort? Basically, which service is better for families as far as benefits etc. Air force or Navy...
 

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Well, obviously Iraq isn't the only place where military physicians are stationed, and I can see that in these current times one would find it safe to assume that this is where the majority of military docs will be sent. However, I am talking about naval and air force bases around the globe. Or when I said "deployment," does this term strictly apply to the war effort? Basically, which service is better for families as far as benefits etc. Air force or Navy...
As far as the Navy goes: The term deployment is used for any extended time for work that takes you away from your family. This could be on a ship, with a MC unit, or whatever, and you could go anywhere from South America, Gitmo, to the Med, or even the sandbox.

You could be stationed overseas permanently (which means that you could spend 1-3 years stationed at that command) and in most cases you should be able to take your family with you. I'm not sure how many unaccompanied billets there are left. Historically those billets overseas, particularly in Rota Spain and others, are highly sought after (but not impossible).

Good Luck :)
 
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Kingfisher

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To BabyKangaroo,
Also, your family will need to be flexable to the point of being "liquid" at times. Life in any service can be hard. Both services have +'s and -'s, just try and weigh out what you want (location, programs, etc.) and above all make sure you are informed. It sounds like you are off to a good start. Keep asking questions.
 

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Well, obviously Iraq isn't the only place where military physicians are stationed, and I can see that in these current times one would find it safe to assume that this is where the majority of military docs will be sent. However, I am talking about naval and air force bases around the globe. Or when I said "deployment," does this term strictly apply to the war effort? Basically, which service is better for families as far as benefits etc. Air force or Navy...

Yes, deployment is a specific term that basically means you're going to war. You will NOT be taking your family with you on deployment (although a few exceptions, such as family member who is active duty, a family member that visits you during an unusual "deployment" to Germany etc.)

If you get stationed in Europe or Japan or Guam, of course your family can go. I think you can even (legitimately) take your family to Korea now if you're an officer. There is some talk of making Qatar a place where you are stationed instead of deployed, but I wouldn't count on taking family there, at least for a few years. I mean, it's only 50 miles from Iran.

The benefits in each service are exactly the same. All services are very tough on family. As far as how often you deploy, for how long, and to where, these questions are service, specialty AND time-specific. I cannot speculate on what the answer might be a decade from now when you poke your little turtle head out of the medical training pipeline to see what's going on. The world certainly looked different in 1999 when I entered that pipeline.
 
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