Navy HPSP/Podiatry/Residency Question

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by Creflo, Dec 11, 2008.

  1. Creflo

    Creflo time to eat
    Podiatrist 10+ Year Member

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    Just found out I was accepted for HPSP Navy podiatry, am a 2nd year pod student. I am very close to signing the papers, have done a lot of research but still have one big question:

    I understand that there is one podiatry military residency (Ft. Bragg - Army). If I go to this residency, it is 3 years in length, and requires 4 years of payback (in my case would be Navy payback). I would already owe 3 years active duty for HPSP. Added together, I would owe 7 years active duty after residency. (I've clarified this with my recruiter). 7 years is too much active duty commitment for my comfort level as I have no military experience and don't want to get stuck for this long if I don't like it.

    My recruiter says I can do a civilian residency instead of the Army residency, and then I will only owe 3 years active duty (plus 5 years IRR). I understand this, but can the Navy make me do the military residency? Or can they say after my civilian residency "we want you to do xyz training in xyz hospital and this will add x number of years to your active duty commitment?" (maybe they could claim that the civilian residency was not adequate for their needs, etc.)

    Since my recruiter has said I won't have to do a military residency, should I demand this in writing? (I already have it in email form) If I get it in writing, is it worth anything down the road, or can they extend my obligation for other reasons?

    Thanks for any input or advice
     
  2. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member
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    Very good question and the answer is in DOD Instruction 6000.13. specifically para 6.6.3 (page 13)

    If you do your residency in a military facility, your payback would be concurrent. (same time)

    If you are paid as an active duty member to do your residency at a civilian institution (full time outservice training or FTOS or DUINS) the payback would be consecutive. (additive)

    If you are not paid by the Navy and do your residency at a civilian institution (Navy Active Duty Delay for Specialists or NADDS), there is no additional training obligation and you would only owe the HPSP time.

    I would assume they can force you to do a residency in the Army program if it is available, but they cannot force you to accept FTOS/DUINS. At worst they would have to make you NADDS if the Army program is not an option.

    Here is where I need some education. When you graduate as a DPM are you eligible to obtain a license and practice? In the past I thought you were, but that truth may have changed. If you can practice as a podiatrist immediately following school, you could easily be called to active duty, serve your time and be done. If you have to have a residency, I can see it being more complicated.
     
  3. Creflo

    Creflo time to eat
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    DPM's have to have one year of postgraduate training in order to be licensed to practice in most states (probably all states). However, all podiatric residencies now are 2 to 3 years in length as mandated by the American Podiatric Medical Association. I doubt that any hospital would allow priviledges for new graduates unless they have 2 or 3 years of training (my assumption here, could be wrong).

    The podiatry section chief (in the Navy) told me that they want us to have a 3 year residency now.

    I still am unclear regarding the Ft. Bragg residency (Army). My recruiter said the payback would be additive, not concurrent, but isn't this a military facility? So I wonder why they are telling me that the payback would be additive? (Some of my DO classmates who are HPSP say it should be concurrent, so I'm confused as to which it would be).

    I'll reference DOD paragraph above and check with my recruiter, thanks for above and any additional help!

    By the way, the HPSP handbook apparently has references for medical, dental, nursing students, but not podiatry. They just offered HPSP for podiatry for the first time a couple of months ago. Do you think that they will update the HPSP handbook (it has provisions for board exam reimbursement, instruments, etc.), or kind of "wing it" as they go?
     
  4. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member
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    Your recruiter is mistaken. Bragg is a DoD program, so concurrent payback is in order. Podiatry is a brand new addition. The handbook does not address PAs as well, but I suspect they will be added at the next update. Until then, reasonable costs should be covered.
     
  5. i want out

    i want out Member
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    very subtle, and you might not have noticed it but the podiatry specialty leader said they "WANT" you to have residency.

    They also have "wanted" to have all MD/DO's have residency training since 1998, but it still hasn't happened, and likely never will.

    This is the kind of thing where its good to ask the follow up question, how many podiatrists are out practicing in the Navy with just one year of post graduate training? If he repeats the statement about wanting all of them to have residency, or avoids the question in any other way, then you have your answer.

    i want out (of IRR)
     
  6. Creflo

    Creflo time to eat
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    So under the above scenario, are you referring to a GMO tour (I guess podiatrists wouldn't do these), or just getting pulled out of my 3 year residency after the first year then serving my active duty obligation this way? Then after that I apply to a civilian residency, knowing I've got 5 years of IRR left and could be called out of residency again?

    Anyone know how long a deployment could be in the Navy? My recruiter says 6 months normally.
     
  7. NavyFP

    NavyFP Senior Member
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    First, if they actually put you in a full residency you won't be pulled. Not the Navy's style. They will tell you one year if they are only offering one year.

    And yes, 6 months is the standard deployment.
     
  8. doc1107

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    Sorry I know this is an old tread but I can't find this info anywhere else.

    If you join the Navy as a Podiatrist. What rank are you? Also what rank are you if you join the army?( i assume it would be the same in both Navy and army?)

    If you do the HPSP program, what rank are you during schooling and what rank do you become when you graduate and it is time for active duty?

    Is it the same as dentists, MD/DO where you are O# when you go active duty and you are O1 during school? Thanks
     
  9. BrickHouseMD

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    Not sure, but I always thought that a bachelors level degree got you O1, a doctorate level got you O3, regardless of the field.
     
  10. Creflo

    Creflo time to eat
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    For HPSP Navy Podiatry, you are O1 while in school and become O3 upon graduation.
     

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