nbme 13 calcium/sarc reticulum question

Discussion in 'Step I' started by abelabbot, 05.20.14.

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  1. abelabbot

    abelabbot Banned Banned Account on Hold 2+ Year Member

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    I get the physiology behind this…But I see two different interpretations for this based on discussions posted online…..i think the answer is A, the one with 1 hz, altho its a low frequency, the fact there is contrations + has spaces (meaning calcium gets sequestered back into the sarc reticulum) its therefore the answer….

    The last choice with 12 hz and one major contraction looks like tetanus…Am I correct?
     
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  3. Apoplexy__

    Apoplexy__ Blood-and-thunder appearance Bronze Donor 2+ Year Member

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    Yeah the answer was 1 Hz. I'm not sure if this was all there was to it, but this was my logic:
    Lower frequency --> Fewer voltage-gated Ca2+ opening events --> Less Ca2+ released from sarcoplasmic reticulum --> More Ca2+ left in sarcoplasmic reticulum (more sequestered)

    Not sure if 12 Hz was any particular pathology, but calling it tetanus seems feasible. Anything that increases ACh at the Nm receptor too, I would imagine.
     
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  4. abelabbot

    abelabbot Banned Banned Account on Hold 2+ Year Member

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    Awesome thank you! Yes I didn't even think of that point…the fact that lower frequency would mean fewer voltage gated ca channels will open up.
     
  5. abelabbot

    abelabbot Banned Banned Account on Hold 2+ Year Member

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    lol @ your "location"
     

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