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Need a Job this Summer?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by JerseyBelle, Jun 23, 2002.

  1. JerseyBelle

    JerseyBelle Member

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    This is my advice to you!
    :D !GET A GIG AT A LOCAL HOSPITAL/NURSING HOME (FT/PT/ Per diem)!

    Most, if not all, of them have electronic applications on their websites, just keep hitting them with applications. Many are looking for allied staff. I myself am training for three different positions (Unit Secretary--Cardiac Monitor Tech--Patient Care Assistant) in that order, the better I do; the faster I will get promoted.

    Now, the thing is: EXPOSURE EXPOSURE EXPOSURE! :D
    I have learned more conditions, symptoms, symbols, codes, and meds in the past month I have been working than I could have imagined. If you can get on the doctors' good side, a rare soul will take you aside and explain the whole chart! A cardiologist on my floor did! <img border="0" alt="[Clappy]" title="" src="graemlins/clappy.gif" />

    My situation right now is stressful, but it's exactly what I need, and what you as pre-meds will need. The first two "lecture" years will fly by. It has also given me valuable insight into the ins and out of the hospital, the rush, the fragrance of birth, the stagnant aura of death, and all the mania of smells from blood to vomit in between!
    It will bring you in to the world of the most on-edge personnel the hospital has: NURSES (LVN/LPN/RN/BSN/nursing students). It will show you (like it or not) how much stress and strain they are REALLY under! There is a reason that they residents/3rd & 4th year students like total crap! They get stomped on all day long!
    Trust me, I have made a pact with myself to ALWAYS respect the nurses, NO MATTER WHAT! They go through a gauntlet on one patient alone...

    If you think you could handle a year or two at your local hospital: You will come across everyone from environmental services to head residents and on-call physicians to security. Treat them all the same (with respect for their value to the company, and as people). Believe me, they will talk about you to no end if you don't.

    It may not seem cool, or high-paying, or even very flexible, and it may not be the kind of job you would ever do: TRY IT FIRST!

    It will be an experience that you will carry with you when you get start your journey as a student physician, and for the rest of your career (IF YOU ARE SMART). You will never forget being on the low end of the pole, and you will never treat anyone as such when you step foot in that hospital as a third year!

    BTW: Depending on the unit, nights and evenings are great times to train; less fuss and muss, and the nurses tend to be a little nicer to you... <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />
    BTW: The uniform for most allied staff is scrubs (unless you are in environmental), and buying them now will make it easier on you later. You won't have to buy them when you get to school <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />
    BTW: Be nice to security! If you are working late, they are often the only person keeping you from getting mugged in the parking lot!
    BTW: Unless the hospital has a Subway/Taco Bell/etc, bring your own lunch/eat at the salad bar/get some soup/get a sandwich....You'll be glad you did. :)
     
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  3. abs39

    abs39 Member

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    Do you have any prior medical training? I don't have any formal training, and I haven't been too successful finding a job. I'm willing to do almost anything in a hospital setting, but it seems like most hospitals are looking for certified personnel.
     
  4. JerseyBelle

    JerseyBelle Member

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    Dear Abs:
    It depends on what you apply for. Apply for things like Critical Care Technician, Patient Care Associate, Unit Secretary, Registrar. I mean, let's be real; I've been in orientation classes with people who were former housekeepers now drawing blood and reading charts.
    So, find a hospital that trains in-house (promotes from inside). Call HR, they will tell you. A couple of months at one station (admissions) can very well lead to doing everything the nurses do short of testing.
    Write back and let me know...

    Peace
    Belle
     
  5. JmE

    JmE Member

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    JerseyBelle,

    Again... good post!

    abs39,

    Several years ago, I did time as a CNA (Certified Nursing Assistant), STNA (State Tested Nursing Assistant) as they are now called in my state. About a year ago, I worked as an Medical Assistant (MA) in a fast paced, multi-Dr practice. Now I work in computers at my local hospital until I matriculate in September.

    As a CNA/STNA I experienced perhaps one of the lowest positions in health care. We dealt with individual's daily needs (incontinence and all, etc), Range of Motion, etc. We even did vitals during the process of death and post mortem care (clean up, assist the families, etc). The exposure was very functional. Of course, I cared for many good people that will remain in my memory forever (by now, all are deceased).

    As an MA, I really got to experience what a practice was like. I took histories (a whole lot of em!), vitals, etc. Answering the telephone (Pt questions, concerns, comments), preparing Pt charts (path reports, radiology, etc), cleaning and sterilization of instruments, setup and assisting in procedure (including excisions, biopsies, ENT endoscopy, etc), sending tissue out to labs (preparing the paperwork, looking up insurance codes, etc), were just a few parts of my job. I loved the work! Equally important, I observed much of what the Dr.'s day in the office was like, how Pt concerns were addressed, Dr.'s preparation for procedures, and the like. One of them would even take the time to point out key things he was looking for in the chart as well as the examination. He also taught me much about dealing with difficult situations with Pts. He gave me hints and advice about the school he attended and I ended up actually being accepted at that school.(As a side note, no he did not write my LOR to the school.)

    I came to my present position because I closed down my computer & networking business in preparation for school. My local hospital knew I am going to school and gave me temporary employment. I could have worked in a clinical environment there instead, however, the need for a quick opening and financial considerations were the deciding factor.

    In all three, I earned a wage. The requirement in my state for STNA was a 75 hour class (which the facility paid for and paid me for the two weeks to attend). For the MA position, I had just finished my BS and was looking for volunteer work. They needed a part time MA. This was during my MCAT study & application to med school time. Reluctantly, I took the paying position and I am glad I did as I learned so much. BTW: They knew from the beginning of the process I was going through. The fact that I was applying to med shcool was a big plus!

    My current position is due to my 15+ experience in this area (my pre-med career). It has allowed me to see every corner of the hospital (where I will be coming back to practice) and meet just about all of the people there (small town hospital). I think I am learning more about the "big picture" of a health care facility in my present position than I would have been able to do in a clinical role.

    Most notably, there are entry level positions out there to be discovered. One might have a very limited role in the care of Pts, however, it does help submerge you in the realm of Pt care. Also, I found most places more receptive when they knew I was working towards being a Dr.

    Hope this helps.

    -JmE-

    [Edited for a pesky typo... probably didn't get them all <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" /> ]
     

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