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need help from med student now please

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by AntGod22, Feb 10, 2002.

  1. AntGod22

    AntGod22 Senior Member
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    OK GUYS I HAVE A QUESTION FROM MY HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY CLASS, HERE IT GOES

    A student is beginnin to train for the swim teeam and in the early stages of her training, she experienced great fatigue following a workout and she found herself gasping and panting for air more then her teammates. Her couach suggested that she eat less proteins and fats, and increase the carbohydrates while she trains more gradually. She also complained about chronic pain in her arms and shoulders that begin with the training. Following an intense workout she experienced severe pain in her left pectoral region and sought medical help.
    What might be responsible for this student's symptoms???

    OK GUYS I NEED YOUR HELP ON THIS ONE I TRIED EVERYTHING AND I HAVE MY OWN IDEAS THAT IT COULD BE JUST FROM LACTIC ACID BUILDUP SINCE PROBABLY SHE ISNT GETTING IN ENOUGH AIR SINCE SHE IS SWIMMING IN WATER AND HOLDING HER BREATH. But why the left pect region and why tell me about the change in diet? please help this answer needs to be only a few sentences and handed in by 2 monday.
    thanks
    anthony
     
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  3. I'm a biochemist... But... Here goes.

    The carbohydrates are complex sugars. They are "stored fuel" for the body. They are slower to metabolize and stay around alot longer than simple sugars. "Carbing up" before exercise is a good way to combat fatigue. It's like filling your fuel tanks.

    The pain in the left pectoral region could be alot of things, and without more information it's hard to guess. It could be a strain of the muscles that separate the ribs. I forget, are they costals? Anyway, a strain there is extremely painful. It could be pleural inflammation from all that heavy breathing. That can be very painful too. It could be some underlying heart condition. I am sure I can think up some others too, but I'm late for work. Without specific tests, etc... You can't make a clear cut case from that description... At least... I can't. But I'm just a biochemist.

    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by AntGod22:
    <strong>OK GUYS I HAVE A QUESTION FROM MY HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY CLASS, HERE IT GOES

    A student is beginnin to train for the swim teeam and in the early stages of her training, she experienced great fatigue following a workout and she found herself gasping and panting for air more then her teammates. Her couach suggested that she eat less proteins and fats, and increase the carbohydrates while she trains more gradually. She also complained about chronic pain in her arms and shoulders that begin with the training. Following an intense workout she experienced severe pain in her left pectoral region and sought medical help.
    What might be responsible for this student's symptoms???

    OK GUYS I NEED YOUR HELP ON THIS ONE I TRIED EVERYTHING AND I HAVE MY OWN IDEAS THAT IT COULD BE JUST FROM LACTIC ACID BUILDUP SINCE PROBABLY SHE ISNT GETTING IN ENOUGH AIR SINCE SHE IS SWIMMING IN WATER AND HOLDING HER BREATH. But why the left pect region and why tell me about the change in diet? please help this answer needs to be only a few sentences and handed in by 2 monday.
    thanks
    anthony</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">
     
  4. William Bohannon

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    As this is an academic type question, God only knows what kind of answer the professor is looking for.

    Anyway, my guesses:
    The easy answer - The swimmer needs to built her glycogen stores in her muscles. This could be done by physical trainning and carb loading.

    The hard answer - There are a number of inborn errors of metabolism. A class of these errors include glycogen storage diseases. Off the top of my head, I thing it's McArtle's or something like that that primarly affects the skeletal muscles. Since the muscles can't effectively use glycogen stores, you can get muscle breakdown after physical activity. Symptoms include muscle cramping and episodes of hypoglycemia.

    Then again, you could just drop you physiology text book, reach down to pick it up and glance at the page where it fell open. This too could give you the correct answer.

    Remember, even a broken clock is right two times a day.

    Will
     

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