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Need Help from the MD/PhDs

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by Dr. Nick, Apr 23, 2002.

  1. Dr. Nick

    Dr. Nick Senior Member
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    Can anyone who has taken 2+ years out between 2 & 3rd years describe to me their subsequent experiences during 3rd year.

    How did you cope with the wards after time off for research?

    What did you do to ease the transition?

    How were your grades?

    Any anecdotal advice would be greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. mrp

    mrp Member
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    Well, your mileage may vary but...

    the transition back to 3rd year after 4 years in grad school was much, much less of a problem than I had anticipated. I had been dreading it for about a year, but it was actually great!

    3rd year is fun! I had been catastrophizing 3rd year for a while, imaging a hellish year without any sleep and with nasty attendings constantly yelling and pimping me. I think that's actually what internship will be like, but we'll see...

    It's actually not been like that at all in my experience. True, you have to get up early occasionally, and every now and then you come across a nasty resident/attending, but for the most part the people are nice, supportive, and (most important) interested in teaching. Plus, the stuff you learn is for the most part pretty cool.

    The expectations that residents and faculty have for most 3rd years are actually pretty low--it's easy to surprise people. They expect students to know next to nothing, so when you demonstrate that you've been reading and are interested and helpful, you get nice evals.

    In summary, my recipe for doing well in 3rd year is:
    1) always show up on time.
    2) look interested.
    3) be pleasant and enthusiastic.
    4) dress professionally.
    5) read, read, read.

    cheers,

    -mrp
     
  4. Dr. Nick

    Dr. Nick Senior Member
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    Thanks MRP! Just curious, how long were you out for? Did you do anything during this time or before you returned to brush up on your clinical knowledge?
     
  5. mrp

    mrp Member
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    I spent 4 years in grad school studying vesicular protein trafficking (golgi to lysosome) in yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae). not terribly clinical, to say the least. And I did nothing to maintain any of the knowledge that I very painfully burned into my brain the first 2 years of med school.

    However, I am continually surprised at the random facts and associations that I have been dredging up from my memory of 4-5 years ago. Also, it seems that even if I can't remember all the facts, it is much easier to learn the second time around. Even if you say "I don't remember anything" now, you will be surprised at what you will remember with just a little prompting.

    Basically, I wouldn't stress. EVERYONE is freaked out and stressed by 3rd year, not just the people that have taken time out.

    The one thing I would reccomend is to brush up on your H&P skills, as this will help you no matter what your clinical rotation schedule. Skim through bates, practice on roomates/significant other's, etc. I know that I was extremely rusty, and this was probably the most stressful thing early in 3rd year. One thing that some schools have is a free, student run clinic. I didn't participate, but I'd wished I had, as it would have maintained my clinical skills.

    -mrp
     
  6. Dr. Nick

    Dr. Nick Senior Member
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by mrp:
    <strong>I spent 4 years in grad school studying vesicular protein trafficking (golgi to lysosome) in yeast (saccharomyces cerevisiae). not terribly clinical, to say the least. And I did nothing to maintain any of the knowledge that I very painfully burned into my brain the first 2 years of med school.

    However, I am continually surprised at the random facts and associations that I have been dredging up from my memory of 4-5 years ago. Also, it seems that even if I can't remember all the facts, it is much easier to learn the second time around. Even if you say "I don't remember anything" now, you will be surprised at what you will remember with just a little prompting.

    Basically, I wouldn't stress. EVERYONE is freaked out and stressed by 3rd year, not just the people that have taken time out.

    The one thing I would reccomend is to brush up on your H&P skills, as this will help you no matter what your clinical rotation schedule. Skim through bates, practice on roomates/significant other's, etc. I know that I was extremely rusty, and this was probably the most stressful thing early in 3rd year. One thing that some schools have is a free, student run clinic. I didn't participate, but I'd wished I had, as it would have maintained my clinical skills.

    -mrp</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">That's great MRP, thanks. For me the break has been 2 years - I'm hoping that I won't be too rusty compared to my fellow 3rd years. I've read first aid for the wards and I'm reviewing Pharm & Path Review books. I also plan to read the text for my first rotation before starting this summer. Wish me luck! *gulp*
     

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