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Neonatology insight

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by CardioKing, May 16, 2002.

  1. CardioKing

    CardioKing New Member

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    I was wondering if anyone could tell me what the hours of a neonatologist are like. I am also intrested in how competative the fellowship is to obtain, common procedures that they do and the pay that they recieve. Thanks.
     
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  3. trouta

    trouta Senior Member

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    Try Neonatology on the Web: <a href="http://www.neonatology.org/." target="_blank">http://www.neonatology.org/.</a>
     
  4. oldbearprofessor

    Administrator Rocket Scientist Physician Faculty SDN Advisor

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    Hi - Neonatology has relatively a large amount of night work as babies seem to like to come out and "play" then. Most hospitals have a rotation type-system for night call, but in general, one can expect to do it throughout an entire career. Many hospitals used nurse clinicians to help with the nighttime load. There really isn't a typical frequency of night-call but every 4th-6th night would be representative of most programs call for faculty/attendings. Fellowships are usually every 3rd - 5th night call.

    The most common procedures a neontatologist does are to place various lines in newborns such as catheters in the umbilical vessels and percutaneous central catheters. Neonatologists also place chest tubes but fortunately this isn't called for too often.

    Fellowship opportunities abound at most major university programs. A good performance during pediatric residency should ensure a fellowship. One of the key criteria in choosing fellowships is research as most programs have their fellows spend most of about 2 years doing basic or clinical research. Usually it is not expected that applicants have any substantial research background however.

    Salary is extremely variable depending on location and whether one does private vs academic. It is in the range of most subspecialists although private practicing neonatologists frequently are on the high end of most pediatric specialists.

    Hope this helps.

    Regards

    "oldbearprofessor"
     

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