1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice

Interview Feedback: Visit Interview Feedback to view and submit interview information.

Interviewing Masterclass: Free masterclass on interviewing from SDN and Medical College of Georgia

Nervous about being back in school after so long...

Discussion in 'Nontraditional Students' started by DeterminedIrony, Aug 6, 2015.

  1. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I feel extremely nervous about being back in school after so long. Attending a class with younger people with supple minds yet full of the youthful muscle that makes the exercise of studying so easy. My own mind is worn down by childbirth, life and age.
    I am not stupid....far from it; I personally believe I am intelligent enough to make it. I am also hard working and not as naive as I was the first time I went through college. SO why am I in a blind panic and doubting myself every inch of the way?
    This has been my dream for a long time...to be a doctor and a damn good one. Will I make it? Will I even enjoy it? Will my marriage survive it? Can I do Biology, Chemistry and the elusive calculus when I sometimes find myself having to do simple sums with my fingers like a first grade student? Sometimes I just feel too old. Am I making a mistake, wasting my time?

    So many things going through my mind. I know I have no option. If I don't make it, I will at least know I tried. But it is daunting to think of the road ahead. Years of studying and fighting to be what I want to be...what I always wanted to be!

    Well, here goes nothing!!!
     
    Labrat07 likes this.
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. willow84

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2015
    Messages:
    417
    Likes Received:
    795
    Status:
    Medical Student (Accepted)
    I know exactly how you feel! I just took my first class in my post-bacc journey this summer: intro to chem. I've been out of school since finishing grad school in 2008, and it's been over 15 years since I took high school chem. I've doubted myself and my decision so many times already, but I actually really enjoyed the class and the material.

    We'll never know if we don't try. If this all works out and I'm happy in my new career in 10 years then this was all worth it. If I end up hating the classes and not making it to med school then at least I tried. I'd kill myself with "what if's" if I never tried.
     
    Labrat07 likes this.
  4. heartsink

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2013
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    115
    First off don't worry about calculus, you won't need it. It's not on the mcat or expected in Med school unless the school requires a math class (in which case you usually can opt for statistics).

    That right there tells me you haven't researched this nearly enough yet. Spend more time reading. About everything.

    You should especially spend time reading and researching the outcomes for physicians, what that looks like, would you like it, could you stand 8 years total of education including residency and can you realistically handle that financially with your family.

    Try and get clinical experience and shadow physicians. Get a feel for being in a hospital and being with sick people.

    After you've read a ton on this, heavily researched the path, and looked at everything else you can get your hands on about the process and outcomes, come back to your own questions and answer them yourself.

    And THEN you can think about taking your wagons west and register for science classes.
     
  5. Goro

    Faculty 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    45,675
    Likes Received:
    64,033
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Some of my all time best students were in their 30s and 40s. I graduated one last year at 50.
     
  6. ATL.F.Doc

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2014
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    43
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    how old are you? 32 y/o.

    Edit : You are a late bloomer like me.However, I am a tad older.
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  7. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Heartsink, thank you for your insight. It is solid advice :) . I have actually researched this in depth. I am redoing my undergrad and while calculus is not one of the courses I have to do for med school, it is a class I need to take for the course I am doing currently. I need to have a fall back plan in case this does not go as planned. And I actually want to do it. I want to do challenging courses not just to get the pre-requisites out of the way but to also test how ready I am for the rigorous med school curriculum. If I cannot do it now, then why pay the huge amounts it takes to go through medical school just to fail. As a mother, I need to prove this not just to adcoms but to myself. Make sure I can fly before I jump in. And if I jump in and fail to do as well as I hoped, I need to have a fall back plan, a parachute. A course that I can still depend on for stable employment that will be somewhat satisfying.

    I have shadowed physicians, I have many years of volunteer work (more than 15) from several places including volunteer work during disease outbreaks in developing countries, HIV-AIDS volunteer work etc. The question is not whether I have researched it or not. It is not even whether or not I know what I am getting myself into. The point of this thread was the self doubt most of us Non-Trads (or maybe it's just me?) feel when taking this risk. It is a bigger risk because some of us are giving up stable jobs to pursue this dream. I want to make a difference. I want to be the doctor helping the patients during an outbreak, not the person in the corner filling in the paperwork and passing the supplies around. I know I can do it, I just wonder in my moments of doubt if I should
     
    heartsink likes this.
  8. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I am only 29. Still a wee baby I suppose compared to many non-trads. :)
     
    ATL.F.Doc likes this.
  9. ATL.F.Doc

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2014
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    43
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    You're fine. Do not overthink the age factor. :)
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  10. redj

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2015
    Messages:
    96
    Likes Received:
    19
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Iv been there. Took time off after high school to play army for a few years. I struggled at the beginning and it took me awhile to reteach myself how to study. But Grades are now on the upward trend and about to knock out ochem this fall. It is daunting but just gotta keep the big picture in mind! I have to do this all the time. Ill be 26 next month but feel lot older lol
     
  11. glepurple

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2015
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    12
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    You can do it. I finished my first semester in 3 years over the summer at the ripe age of 28. I wish you the best of luck.
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  12. futuremdforme

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2013
    Messages:
    805
    Likes Received:
    618
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I start med school in 2 weeks at 31. Yesterday, I was panicking about my ability to succeed and this gave me confidence. Thank you!
     
    Labrat07 likes this.
  13. Goro

    Faculty 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    45,675
    Likes Received:
    64,033
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Good luck!

     
  14. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    @DeterminedIrony - I am going to be north of something that rhymes with nifty when my app is complete and verified.

    Let the younger peers motivate you when you feel slow, let your wisdom guide them. Best of luck! This is an awesome journey no matter how it turns out!!
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  15. echo-112

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2014
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    76
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I'm in my early 30's. I was worried whether I could keep up with the "kids" when I started my post-bacc classes.

    When my prof handed back my first chem quiz, I got a 6 out of 10. I barely passed! I thought, "oh sh**, what am I doing..." and I answered myself, "I'm working towards being a doctor." So I studied, and I managed my time well; I slept well, and drank coffee, and used vacation time when I needed it. And I realized I was more focused, more dedicated, and more experienced than anyone in my class.

    Sure, they were young, and could "study all night" for that exam. But they don't care about it as much as you do. And you're smart enough to plan your schedule so you never, ever have to pull an all-nighter (save that for residency! and/or more children).

    So don't worry, you're going to do your best, and you will be one of those "older post-bacc" students that everyone else hates because you care enough to work hard.
     
  16. FutureD0C17

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2014
    Messages:
    98
    Likes Received:
    33
    The hardest part of going back to school is the actual process of stepping through that first doorway to face all your fears. Piece of cake after that.
     
    Ad2b likes this.
  17. Eccesignum

    Eccesignum I Narcanned Your Honor Student
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,611
    Likes Received:
    3,046
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Mid-thirties here. Rebooting undergrad, I've had professors younger than I am.

    The kicker was when my trig professor understood slang being tossed around class...and I didn't.

    My lawn, get off it.
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  18. JRRSEhope

    JRRSEhope SecondChanceDoc.com
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    4
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Hmph. People in their 30s thinkin' they're old. Geeez! I'll never understand those who start getting measured for a casket when they're approaching the half-century mark.

    I didn't finish my undergrad til I was in my 40s. Most of my professors were younger than me. Some were younger than my children. ALL my fellow students were younger than me. So what?

    In some ways, pursuing this dream of medicine later in life is harder than if I'd done it when I was 20-something. And all those ways are pointed out repeatedly by many people on this forum.

    In many ways, pursuing this dream of medicine later in life is way way way easier.
    • I'm all grown up. Meaning: I'm not struggling with 'issues', I've got my mind right, I know how to take care of myself physically and emotionally.
    • I have lived the economic reality. I know the value of finances, what's up with ginormous student loans, and what's realistic moving forward.
    • I know exactly how to learn. Its not rocket science. But its very personal.
    • I truly don't care about or need anyone else's approval. Is it nice to have support? Sure. But its not essential. So when I've encountered the inevitable age-discrimination thing, I simply move on.
    Medicine is for people so passionate about pursuing it, that you can't possibly do anything else.
     
  19. Bebe12

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2011
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    11
    Status:
    Other Health Professions Student
    It can be really scary to do something new in general, but it's immensely helpful when you wholeheartedly want to do it and there's drive behind what you want to do. For me I had only a few years between finishing grad school and starting my pre-reqs but it's a completely different experience this time around. Keep telling yourself that nothing is impossible! Once you start schooling, you might have a few weeks of adjustment period but after that it'll feel natural and you'll get into the groove of things. You'll actually be surprised- many times you're not the oldest person in class (esp in community college classes).
    When things get hard, remember to inspire yourself and think about WHY you're doing this- imagine yourself at the end of your goal. Don't worry so much- if this is what you want to do, try to quiet the apprehensions in your mind, take a deep breath and GO! Best of luck!
     
  20. Seattle Mariners Fan

    Seattle Mariners Fan SDN Bronze Donor
    Bronze Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    163
    The ability to learn academically is a lot like every other human ability, and atrophies when not used. If you did well before there's a very high chance you still will.

    Socially it's awkward, period, so you're going to have to develop a lot of outcome independence. Economically it's crazy, period, so you'll be fine financially in two decades. There's just no way around either of these. But academically? Odds are if you do the work you will do well.

    I would not anticipate enjoying a postbac because of the factors I mention above. I've found the material intrinsically very interesting but the social side to be so disastrous as to make the experience unpleasant generally.

    Also I would not anticipate all but the very best wives or girlfriends to stick around through one. It's economically crazy until you get admitted, and then it's only 20 more years till break even. Crazy for you to do one, crazier for someone to follow you....
     
    #19 Seattle Mariners Fan, Aug 13, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2015
  21. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I did spend more time researching as you advised. I thought I should mention that some schools actually specify a semester of Calc as one of their requirements... in case someone else were reading this and was not aware of this.
     
    heartsink likes this.
  22. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Which ones outside of Harvard?
     
  23. Eccesignum

    Eccesignum I Narcanned Your Honor Student
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,611
    Likes Received:
    3,046
    Status:
    Medical Student
  24. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Brown University, Penn State, U of Mississippi (preffered), Washington U, Harvard and Wright State (preferred).

    I obviously haven't looked at all schools in the US but these are a few I found.
     
  25. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
  26. Eccesignum

    Eccesignum I Narcanned Your Honor Student
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,611
    Likes Received:
    3,046
    Status:
    Medical Student
    The MSAR is the only resource I've ever found that lists all courses for each allopathic school in one place. It's worth buying on the AAMC site if you don't have it already. I would cross-check it against the websites of schools you're interested in to be absolutely sure of the data.

    In general, the pre-reqs tend to be 1 yr each with lab of Bio, Gen Chem, OChem, Physics, with 1-2 semesters of English. Now that the new MCAT is out many schools want a semester of Biochem (some want labs, some don't; some will let you take biochem instead of Ochem II, some won't), and 1-2 semesters of humanities (some are more specific than others as to which subjects count).

    Here's another pdf from Bryn Mawr with science requirements above and beyond the four basic sci's: http://www.brynmawr.edu/healthpro/documents/MedSchlAdvanScienReq_2015.pdf It does not include humanities and English requirements.

    But the best resource is always going to be the MSAR and school sites, always check those and check anything floating around the web against a school's website. That'll be the definitive answer. I know it's a pain but it must be done.
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  27. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    9 schools REQUIRE calculus. Others might, most do not, suggest it OR they say "calc or statistics"

    Of the 15 schools that REQUIRE calculus:

    The UCS'
    Harvard
    Louisville
    JHSM

    How many non-trads actually I apply to those schools???
     
  28. Eccesignum

    Eccesignum I Narcanned Your Honor Student
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,611
    Likes Received:
    3,046
    Status:
    Medical Student
    According to USNWR, non trads make up:

    65% at Harvard
    15% at Louisville
    36% at Johns Hopkins
    95% at UC Davis (didn't check the rest of the UCs but I'll assume it's similar)

    So...obviously quite a few apply :) If you have the stats (and the guts) why not?
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  29. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I don't think Non-Trads should be limited to some schools. We are as smart as traditional students, sometimes more so (especially when it comes to discipline and wisdom). If my grades allow it, I intend to apply for some of these schools.
     
    #28 DeterminedIrony, Nov 1, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2015
  30. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I am not saying non-trads should not apply to those schools ... but how many do? and how many get in?

    If only 8 schools REQUIRE it, why bother taking the class unless you really want to apply to those schools? And only if you know you can ace the class.

    The OP is "really nervous" and wondering if he's "wasting his time" - why push CALCULUS on someone who is at that point? Most likely, the OP, is not going to apply to those schools so calculus is NOT required for him.

    That's my only point :) the rest of you that want to apply, better take it!! :D

    BTW, I hate getting into data dumps from websites to prove a point. Think about the OP's particular situation, and circumstances. Then apply the data. Data does not tell the whole story.

    If the OP had started with, "I carry a 4.0 from a very good, liberal arts college where I majored in history with a minor in chemistry but graduated 5 years ago and am now married with two kids and wondering if I should take calculus to bolster my chances for HARVARD"

    well then, the answer is yes. because with those stats and that "tone" he would be able to be competitive for the other 7 schools that require calculus. BUT that is not our OP.
     
    Gurby and DeterminedIrony like this.
  31. Eccesignum

    Eccesignum I Narcanned Your Honor Student
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1,611
    Likes Received:
    3,046
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I think you're reading things into my replies that aren't there. Nobody is pushing OP to do anything. OP asked about math pre-reqs and there they are. It's their judgement based on situation whether to take calc for calc-needy schools or forgo it.
     
    Ad2b and DeterminedIrony like this.
  32. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    I am the OP and while I am nervous about school, this does not mean I do not accept the challenge. One thing I am doing with my premed is trying to determine if indeed this path is for me. I am trying to take challenging courses to ensure I am not walking into a fire without proper equipment and protection. I know it's challenging and I am preparing for that. With a family where I am the breadwinner, I don't want to go into it with blind ambition. I want to make sure it is for me before I sign up. In the event I find I am good at it, I want to make sure I am able to apply to any school without limitations.

    I believe I am a competitive petential applicant. Years of clinical volunteering, averaged out to a 4.0 my first 3.5 years of college and only flunked out my last sem because I could not afford the tuition and was not allowed to sit my exams. All this was international though so if I perform at my regular level I have a shot at a good score within the US. I do believe I can do it. This thread was not a display of my mediocre stats, more to portray how nervous I am to start again.

    Also, I am a she ☺

    Lastly, Johns Hopkins is my dream school. It's a reach but who knows right?
     
    #31 DeterminedIrony, Nov 1, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2015
    Ad2b likes this.
  33. EMT2ER-DOC

    EMT2ER-DOC Why so Serious?????
    Physician 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2003
    Messages:
    2,406
    Likes Received:
    205
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    I started medical school at the age of 32 when I had 3 children. When you are starting school, at least full time, after not having been a student for so long it can be daunting. You need to find the happy medium that works for you. What I did, may not be the right option for you. That being said, I treated my schooling as a full time job. I would be at school Monday through Friday and come home for dinner and spend time with the family. I would then go to the library and study until it closed. You need to find out the best way for you to study and do it.

    The next thing is not to be too proud to ask for help. See a tutor at school, even if it is to review the material before a test to make sure that you understand it. But certainly if you are having any sort of trouble, get the tutor and spend time with the professor during office hours. Use the web to your advantage. What I found was that some you tube videos were very helpful in explaining certain concepts that I found difficult.

    Finally, take a deep breath. You will be able to do it. Find some comraderie (sp?) in your classes and form a study group. They really do help.
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  34. wholeheartedly

    Administrator 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,937
    Likes Received:
    2,872

    From what I see in this table the university of Mississippi doesn't require calc. They have it listed as an acceptable substitute for other Math courses https://www.umc.edu/Education/Schools/Medicine/SOM_Admissions/Method_1__Traditional_Courses.aspx

    Hopkins wants calc or statistics.
    http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/som/admissions/md/application_process/prerequisites_requirements.html
     
  35. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    How are you doing that? To me, the best one can do is take the first step and take a class. Get used to being on campus again with younger peers, competing to get the best grade in class.

    If successful there, take the next class or two, then rinse/repeat until at the door of the MCAT OR until one figures out that the path is no bueno.

    This is a very long road and there are many bumps along with it; even for traditional premeds the bumps are there; with the addition of family and spouse, it can get even bumpier. There is nothing that can assure of you anything, unfortunately. You just have to try and decide with each step to continue or stop.

    Outside of the required pre-reqs, what else are you thinking of taking? They tend to be pretty challenging anyway (many suffer through either orgo or physics or both)

    how are you doing that?

    In my family, there is my son and there is me. My income supports myself, my son, and my very elderly parents. It is not easy but the one thing I have focused on is this:

    I cannot imagine doing anything else. I've tried. For 25 years, I tried to bury the drive, to hide it, to put the fire out but it kept coming back.

    Prepare to be - eh - enlightened. I know of no one that has that kind of application. For instance, a D-1, female major sports player from a prestigious school, carried a
    "true" 4.0 through her BS in chemistry with physics and Spanish minors, while setting up a non-profit for the homeless in her city, volunteering 1000s of hours in clinical and non-clinical settings with years of substantiated other shadowing of physicians, not needing financial aid (she's full ride on scholarships), 41 MCAT, Clinton Foundation award ...

    She "settled" for Georgetown (though she did match to a hellagood residency!!!) and no, she's not a bad interviewee. My point is that even she did not get her #1 choice school :) There are always limitations: fit, cultural, $$$, etc.

    Based on?

    That confidence is critical. You'll need it. Forever! :)

    Don't stop believing in yourself; you'll need that + for the next 10+ years of your life, if not forever.

    Sorry about the "he"

    You brought up calculus and my only point is: unless you are going to the 8 schools listed in the document provided by ECC, you do NOT need it. Therefore, why worry about it and whether or not you can do the math required outside of fingers and toes???

    This post is probably coming across stronger in a negative way that I intend so suffice to say my whole point is this:

    You cannot decide if this is for you or not before you start. Otherwise, you'll always have one foot out the door instead of two feet planted firmly on the path.

    Marathon, not a sprint. Key slogan on this, and many other premed forums. I can attest to the bumps tossing me around like a trampoline only when I landed, sometimes, it was hard, cold ground. Yet, with everything to gain and nothing to lose, I take the MCAT on 1/23 at the age of 51.

    You can do this - so stop the negative, destructive, self-doubt. :)
     
    #34 Ad2b, Nov 1, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2015
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  36. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
  37. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    That is exactly what I am doing. I was in school (had to withdraw due to medical reasons) but currently doing online courses through khan academy, MIT open courseware and Berkeley online to keep myself in tune. I will be back in school next semester and going again :)
     
    Ad2b likes this.
  38. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    Awesome!! Then STOP doubting yourself!!! Life and time will tell you whether you can do this :) Promise.
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  39. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Thank you @Ad2b. Your post did not come across as negative at all, it was actually very encouraging with a healthy dose of reality. I know I might not get into my dream school, but I certainly intend to try. To be honest I might not even need the calculus at all but I want to do it just in case. Worst case scenario is I do it and don't need it. Best case scenario, I do it and get into JHU or Harvard (A girl can dream, right?).

     
    Ad2b likes this.
  40. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    I understand with the calculus. However, I might suggest waiting until done with the required pre-reqs (gen chem, orgo, physics, biochem) and MCAT first. Then, if your stats and everything else are competitive for JHSM, THEN take calculus...

    And thank you - sometimes my tone comes across more terse than I intend :)
     
    DeterminedIrony likes this.
  41. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    This is solid advice.
     
  42. wholeheartedly

    Administrator 7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Messages:
    4,937
    Likes Received:
    2,872
    I've heard MSAR isn't always the most accurate, though it is the best resource. I'd trust the school's own website over, MSAR. That said, when in doubt, the best policy is always to just call the school to clarify.
     
    DeterminedIrony and Ad2b like this.
  43. Ad2b

    Ad2b SDN Gold Donor
    Gold Donor Classifieds Approved 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,483
    Likes Received:
    2,272
    Status:
    Pre-Medical
    :claps:
     
  44. DeterminedIrony

    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Messages:
    121
    Likes Received:
    78
    Status:
    Non-Student
    Indeed they do not require it but they advised me that it is preferred. Same with Wright State. You are right about Johns Hopkins. I must have old info
     

Share This Page