jdwmont

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What are the residency programs that are most well-known for a strong emphasis on cognitive neuroscience? I am particularly interested in future developments in psychiatry/neurology trending toward a synthesis of the two disciplines (behavioral neurology/neuropsychiatry). Furthermore, I'm interested in TMS, DBS, etc. Would love to hear your opinions/observations regarding programs that are strong in these areas.
 

jdwmont

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170 views and no replies... guess I'll try neuro ;)
 

Little Bay

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Hi,

So, this was important to me as well. I matched at Harvard Longwood, and I think they have lots of neuropsychiatry (Besides the interview, I haven't been there yet, but it's all over their website and the chair talks about it at the interview.) Other places that have a fair amount, that I know of: Hopkins, Dartmouth and UMass.

I agree with you -- I think modern psych programs should have a ton of neuropsych, imaging and anatomy, but surprisingly, most did not.
 

OldPsychDoc

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I don't think you'll find one residency program that is "well-known for a strong emphasis" on these areas. You will find many residency programs where you can attach yourself to active research programs in these areas. For example, Columbia is probably the "home" of TMS research right now, but as to whether TMS permeates the entire residency program...I'm guessing you could probably do 4 years there and not feel that you've been immersed in it. So my advice would be to look for the labs and groups that are doing active research in the area you want to be involved in, and then look at the residency programs attached to them, instead of the other way around. You'll probably find the "usual suspects" are fertile places to do research along with residency--e.g. Pittsburgh, Yale, Columbia, Hopkins, Wash U, UCSF, Stanford... You may also find some really strong cognitive neuroscience programs on the fringes of mid-range residencies at places like Iowa, Minnesota, UCSD, just to name a couple.
 

worriedwell

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Penn would be a good place to look. DBS trials, a TMS clinic, NIH money, one of the best Neuro departments in the country. The department of psychiatry interfaces with neurosurgery and neurology in a specialized neuroscience institute...the name of which escapes me.
 

Doc Samson

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Hi,

So, this was important to me as well. I matched at Harvard Longwood, and I think they have lots of neuropsychiatry (Besides the interview, I haven't been there yet, but it's all over their website and the chair talks about it at the interview.) Other places that have a fair amount, that I know of: Hopkins, Dartmouth and UMass.

I agree with you -- I think modern psych programs should have a ton of neuropsych, imaging and anatomy, but surprisingly, most did not.
I believe Longwood now has a neuroscience track under the direction of the new Chair at Brigham (David Silberswieg). Longwood residents also train at Beth Israel Deaconess which has a specilty neuropsych/behavioral neurology clinic and could reasonably be considered the home of TMS research in Boston.
 

HMSPSYCH

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What are the residency programs that are most well-known for a strong emphasis on cognitive neuroscience? I am particularly interested in future developments in psychiatry/neurology trending toward a synthesis of the two disciplines (behavioral neurology/neuropsychiatry). Furthermore, I'm interested in TMS, DBS, etc. Would love to hear your opinions/observations regarding programs that are strong in these areas.
Amongst the four harvard programs: Longwood has a strong neuroscience program. TMS/ECT over at the west BI campus, headed by Dr. B and V.. Farr 2. Maybe stronger now with the arrival of the new BWH psychiatry chair, Dr. S. MGH/Mclean also has a very strong neuroscience program with everything you can imagine. South Shore also has a strong neuroscience program(neuroimaging) with their current chair, Dr. M. and the VABHS/BWH ties, with ECT training but no TMS that I'm aware of. I'm pretty sure all three have research tracks for residents. I don't know about Cambridge.

Just my opinion but seems like Columbia has the overall best neuroscience program including neuroimaging, ECT, TMS, and other neuromodoluation therapies.
 

jdwmont

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Excellent! I'll be starting med school at Creighton this summer, so I will be a fair way away from any of these programs. Any suggestions on how to best go about establishing a research and/or away rotation w/these programs?
 

OldPsychDoc

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Excellent! I'll be starting med school at Creighton this summer, so I will be a fair way away from any of these programs. Any suggestions on how to best go about establishing a research and/or away rotation w/these programs?
When you're starting first year anatomy and neuroscience, start finding out what's available to you there. It might be more than you think. Then ask your instructors where they trained, who they would want to work with, etc...they'll see the field with a wider perspective. Also--you're not *that* far from programs in Denver, Iowa, St. Louis, Chicago, Minneapolis. For that matter Southwest Airlines does fly to Omaha...so any away rotation is within your grasp when the time comes.
 

HMSPSYCH

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Excellent! I'll be starting med school at Creighton this summer, so I will be a fair way away from any of these programs. Any suggestions on how to best go about establishing a research and/or away rotation w/these programs?
For away rotation at HMS, you'll need to apply through the office of registrar. Emailing the program directors expressing your interests is another good option. GL!


http://www.hms.harvard.edu/registrar/aServices/xClerk.html
 

st2205

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$3,000/month for an elective rotation? Perhaps if my school pro-rated my tuition for not being there.
 

st2205

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I was browsing the site from my phone and saw that you'd pay a $100 application fee then just under 3k/mo since that's HMS' tuition for their students. I hope you're right but I'll get a link when I get to a computer.
 

pingouin

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No, you're right, it says that- but I think it's just for international students.. from the General Information link:

Are there any fees or tuition for this program?
All applicants to the HMS Exchange Clerkship Program must pay a $100.00 application processing fee for each month for which they are applying. In addition, international exchange clerks pay a tuition charge for each month they are scheduled. As of September, 2005, tuition is $2,950.00 per month. This tuition represents 1/12 of the tuition paid annually by Harvard Medical School MD candidates.
 

st2205

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Thanks I missed that the first time. Good to know!
 

maranatha

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$3,000/month for an elective rotation? Perhaps if my school pro-rated my tuition for not being there.
You could have a nice time in the Riviera Maya for far less then 3K! I don't have the study in front of me, but I think a meta-analysis showed that guacamole, margaritas, and snorkeling are far better for the brain then doing an away rotation.

 

OldPsychDoc

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You could have a nice time in the Riviera Maya for far less then 3K! I don't have the study in front of me, but I think a meta-analysis showed that guacamole, margaritas, and snorkeling are far better for the brain then doing an away rotation.

Definitely an issue which needs more research.
Much more research.

I may have found my reason for returning to academia....
 

pingouin

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You could have a nice time in the Riviera Maya for far less then 3K! I don't have the study in front of me, but I think a meta-analysis showed that guacamole, margaritas, and snorkeling are far better for the brain then doing an away rotation.
I have to admit, this was my primary motivation for even going to the link. :oops: Even if I do an away, it won't be on the East Coast but I just had to see if it might *really* cost me a couple grand.

Thought process: "REALLY? But there are so many BETTER ways for me to spend that money. Like a vacation." :D
 

st2205

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You could have a nice time in the Riviera Maya for far less then 3K! I don't have the study in front of me, but I think a meta-analysis showed that guacamole, margaritas, and snorkeling are far better for the brain then doing an away rotation.

But it looks like the only people having to shell out the 3k are the ones already living on an island paradise. "So... catch 22."