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Neurosurgery Residency lifestyles (in Chi and elsewhere)

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by blakey, Apr 19, 2002.

  1. blakey

    blakey New Member

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    Apr 17, 2002
    An earlier thread sorta dealt with this, but not fully...Are there any neurosurgery residencies out there that are somewhat bearable? (I know this is relative but...)
    I'm a third year and really feel a pull in that direction. I have the grades and scores and all to be competitive, but I don't know if the lifestyle is something I can handle (and I know that probably tells me something). But a recent thread seemed to hint that some places were not as bad. Also, I know Barrows advertised their call schedule on their website, and it seemed reasonable. Anyone with info or advice, I would be much obliged. Also, in particular, someone who knows about Chicago programs, that would be even more appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. hosskp1

    hosskp1 Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 30, 2002
    I am not familiar with Chicago but I have learned afew things about Neurosurgery lifestyle in residency.
    Do not get so territorial-- Go where you get in. It is competetive and people go where they can.
    Prepare to work--hard real hard. I met a neurosurgeon who did two years of general surgery and did not like it so he went into Neurosurgery, HE said he worked his ass off. Hew was Q2or Q3 his 2nd and 3rd year of residency, Q2 his 4th and 5th year and Q1 his final year of residency(he said he hardly ever went home). It is a tough life-- but if you want to do it- you are probably willing to pay the price. I wish you the best.
     
  4. MacGyver

    MacGyver Banned Banned

    3,761
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    Aug 8, 2001
    In my opinion, Q1 call is unnecessarily dangerous to patients. A lot of these patients are in critical condition, and it does them no justice to treat them with people who can barely remember their name because they've been awake the last 40 hours.
     
  5. Ferris

    Ferris Member 7+ Year Member

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    May 3, 2001
    Q2 abd Q3 call will become remnants of the past in a short time. It is irresponsible and one factor that contributes to declining trends in surgery applicants. Most programs will be Q4 and there are those with more livable call schedules such as the Barrow, Mayo, and Michigan to name a few. I also know of other programs that are Q4 or Q5 that are incorporating measures to allow residents more rest. For instance, Duke allows residents to sleep for 4-5 hours post-call on the morning after call. Other institutions are creating similar solutions.

    Neurosurgery is still one of the most exciting and challenging fields of medicine/surgery. It is also incredibly rewarding personally and financially-- I know of several recent chief residents that were offered starting salaries ranging from $300K - 1.25M.

    Good luck.
     
  6. Can't speak for Michigan, but I rotated away at Mayo and am friends with one of the neurosurgery residents at Barrow. You should dig a little deeper if you are under the impression that these programs have "more liveable" call schedules. On paper, sure, but in reality...
     
  7. Ferris

    Ferris Member 7+ Year Member

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    May 3, 2001
    I rotated at the Barrow and I work at Mayo. I need not look any further. Feel free at any time to call the residents at either place and they will tell you that while they are very busy, their lifestyle relative to other programs is much better.
     
  8. Sam- the definition of "reasonable" varies... by my definition, q1 call (even if on a beeper leash at home like at Mayo) pushes the limit. Great advice though- ALWAYS check with the residents to see if the hours fit within your own boundaries of what you're willing to do.
     
  9. Careofme

    Careofme Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Jan 10, 2002
    Planet Earth
    Question: Neuorsurgery doesn't differentiate between 'pediatric neurosurgeons' and other neursurgeons, right? If you complete a neurosurgery residency then you can choose to treat peds. only if you'd like but there is no formal training that differentiates the two (i.e. residency-wise).

    Careofme
     
  10. focker

    focker Member 7+ Year Member

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    Apr 12, 2001
    Chicago, IL
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Careofme:
    <strong>Question: Neuorsurgery doesn't differentiate between 'pediatric neurosurgeons' and other neursurgeons, right? If you complete a neurosurgery residency then you can choose to treat peds. only if you'd like but there is no formal training that differentiates the two (i.e. residency-wise).

    Careofme</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Pediatric neurosogeons do a fellowship after residency. I think the fellowships last 2-3 years, which makes for quite a long time in training.
     
  11. hosskp1

    hosskp1 Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Jan 30, 2002
    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by focker:
    <strong> </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Careofme:
    <strong>Question: Neuorsurgery doesn't differentiate between 'pediatric neurosurgeons' and other neursurgeons, right? If you complete a neurosurgery residency then you can choose to treat peds. only if you'd like but there is no formal training that differentiates the two (i.e. residency-wise).

    Careofme</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Pediatric neurosogeons do a fellowship after residency. I think the fellowships last 2-3 years, which makes for quite a long time in training.</strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">you are right, there are fellowships for pediatric neurosugery after you finish the residency. It is a long hard road, but wirth it if that is what you want to do.
     
  12. Ferris

    Ferris Member 7+ Year Member

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    May 3, 2001
    The fellowship length for peds NS is 1-2 years with the average closer to 1 year than to 2.

    Fellowship programs considered at the top are...

    Hospital for Sick Kids... Toronto
    Boston Childrens Hospital... Boston
    The Childrens Hospital of Alabama... Birmingham
     

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