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New Doctor of Nursing Program at Samuel Merritt

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FireCloud9

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New programs are emerging in the Sacramento, CA area. Are you seeing any new programs in your part of the country?

New DNP:
"The Doctor of Nursing Practice degree program will begin at Samuel Merritt University in the Spring of 2011. The National Academy of Science in 2005 stated that "the need for doctorally prepared practitioners and clinical faculty would be met if nursing could develop a new non-research clinical doctorate, similar to the M.D. and Pharm.D. in medicine and pharmacy respectively." The American Association of Colleges of Nursing issued a position statement stating that it has as a goal to transition all advanced practice nursing programs from the master's to the DNP by 2015." Source: http://www.samuelmerritt.edu/nursing/dnp

New Bachelors / MS / PhD in Nursing:
UC Davis School of Nursing
http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/nursing/

Unfortunately, I'm not seeing any new PA programs emerging in the region.
 

chimichanga

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She (the DNP director) introduces herself as "doctor" then proceeds to say she is a 'family nurse practitioner' and a 'physician assistant' (if she calls herself 'doctor' on the web, imagine what she's 'selling' in the exam room)

She wears a long white lab coat in the (lower right) picture on the web page...

The (online!!) program is described as having a 1000 hour 'residency' but, according to her, one's practice and/or masters (clinical) hours can count towards this 1000 hour requirement (up to 750 hours)...

So, after the 250 hours, some theory classes, and a final presentation, you have a DNP, which, by her own admission, doesn't make one a better clinician, just gives one more 'credibility.'

unbelievable...

what a scam...

And with her wearing that lab coat, calling herself doctor, and dropping the 'residency' term all over, how is a patient not supposed to think she's not a physician...

I think I'll side with Taurus on this one, though, I still think, with a little over 100 DNP programs in the country, (42 have cropped up since 2008; Can you say $$$$$$?) these outlanders are in the minority...

Oh, I couldn't resist a quote from a PhD nurse on the site:
"I completed my BSN in Korea, came to the States to pursuit my MS and PhD at University of California, San Francisco."

Way to exercise that advanced education, 'doc' :laugh:
 

FireCloud9

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Chimichanga,

How did you interpret the statement below? Will future DNPs be the norm and MSNs/NPs in decline?

" The American Association of Colleges of Nursing issued a position statement stating that it has as a goal to transition all advanced practice nursing programs from the master's to the DNP by 2015."
 

chimichanga

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states will have to mandate this...I doubt that will happen by 2015...and the federal gov't certainly won't mandate the DNP...
now, some private employers may 'require' the DNP for their own practices, but that's an individual employer decision...
 

Paseo Del Norte

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She (the DNP director) introduces herself as "doctor" then proceeds to say she is a 'family nurse practitioner' and a 'physician assistant' (if she calls herself 'doctor' on the web, imagine what she's 'selling' in the exam room)

She wears a long white lab coat in the (lower right) picture on the web page...

The (online!!) program is described as having a 1000 hour 'residency' but, according to her, one's practice and/or masters (clinical) hours can count towards this 1000 hour requirement (up to 750 hours)...

So, after the 250 hours, some theory classes, and a final presentation, you have a DNP, which, by her own admission, doesn't make one a better clinician, just gives one more 'credibility.'

unbelievable...

what a scam...

And with her wearing that lab coat, calling herself doctor, and dropping the 'residency' term all over, how is a patient not supposed to think she's not a physician...

I think I'll side with Taurus on this one, though, I still think, with a little over 100 DNP programs in the country, (42 have cropped up since 2008; Can you say $$$$$$?) these outlanders are in the minority...

Oh, I couldn't resist a quote from a PhD nurse on the site:
"I completed my BSN in Korea, came to the States to pursuit my MS and PhD at University of California, San Francisco."

Way to exercise that advanced education, 'doc' :laugh:

Word.
 

adayatatime

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I'm not sure I understand the criticism about the white lab coat. I've seen plenty of pharmacists donning these as well. My microbiology and medical physiology profs wore these in the classrooms, and they are not MDs (they are PhDs). Where is it is written that white lab coats are the exclusive dress for MDs? I figure if someone wants to wear one to keep warmer, they could just as well do that.
 

The right Path

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I graduated from the baccalaureate nursing program at Samuel Merritt (and Saint Mary's College). Obviously I can't compare it with other nursing programs that I did not attend. Samuel Merritt has a very favorable reputation in my neck of the woods.

That said, I do not know if that reputation extends to this new DNP program.

I do believe that health care professionals should introduce themselves accurately to their patients, but I think that making a fuss over white coats or whether someone uses the title "Dr." is a little petty and shifts the focus from more substantial concerns such as educational quality, competence, and consistency of DNP programs.

I do believe in the value of furthering nursing education (even though I am not personally pursuing it), however, I agree that the real value of a program of study needs to be demonstrated through measurable outcomes.
 

Gamechanger

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I graduated from the baccalaureate nursing program at Samuel Merritt (and Saint Mary's College). Obviously I can't compare it with other nursing programs that I did not attend. Samuel Merritt has a very favorable reputation in my neck of the woods.

That said, I do not know if that reputation extends to this new DNP program.

I do believe that health care professionals should introduce themselves accurately to their patients, but I think that making a fuss over white coats or whether someone uses the title "Dr." is a little petty and shifts the focus from more substantial concerns such as educational quality, competence, and consistency of DNP programs.

I do believe in the value of furthering nursing education (even though I am not personally pursuing it), however, I agree that the real value of a program of study needs to be demonstrated through measurable outcomes.

Consider if you were an NP and the nursing lobby is pushing for everyone to go DNP.. doesn't this just screw a lot of people into more school / more debt for no good reason other than "prestige"?
 

The right Path

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I'm not sure I understand the criticism about the white lab coat. I've seen plenty of pharmacists donning these as well. My microbiology and medical physiology profs wore these in the classrooms, and they are not MDs (they are PhDs). Where is it is written that white lab coats are the exclusive dress for MDs? I figure if someone wants to wear one to keep warmer, they could just as well do that.

I don't get it either. I've been a nurse for nearly 7 years now, and while I was in nursing school I worked for two family practice physicians, and it wasn't until I joined these forums that I ever heard of this "controversy". And I had no idea that the length of a white coat meant anything at all. In my hospital (nonteaching) white coat wearing among the physicians is maybe half and half. The phlebotomists all wear white coats (long or short, I haven't really noticed). I've never bothered to ask, but I bet it is required. When I was in nursing school we had to do pre-clinical prep which meant going to our clinical site the day/evening before our clinical day and preparing pathophys and med sheets. We were supposed to wear professional casual street clothes with a white jacket with our school insignia badge/patch thing on the shoulder (no length was specified, but mine was short, I still have it in my closet).

It's just a friggin coat people.
 

The right Path

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Consider if you were an NP and the nursing lobby is pushing for everyone to go DNP.. doesn't this just screw a lot of people into more school / more debt for no good reason other than "prestige"?


If that really is the case, then sure.
 

adayatatime

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Daniel-san: You have a brown belt, Mr. Miyagi?
Miyagi-sensei: Why, yes, Daniel-san!
Daniel-san: Wow! Gee whiz! Can I see it!
Miyagi-sensei: Sure. (Lifts of up cheap leather belt holding cheap slacks up). $2.99 from JCPenney. Miyagi like very much.
Daniel-san: Hey, that's not what I meant! I want to see the belt that shows your qualified to kick butt!
Miyagi-sensei: Belt meant to hold up pants. Nothing more, Daniel-san. No need belt to kick butt.

+++

Just adapt this to the full length white coat and derive your own moral.
 

chimichanga

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I'm not sure I understand the criticism about the white lab coat. I've seen plenty of pharmacists donning these as well. My microbiology and medical physiology profs wore these in the classrooms, and they are not MDs (they are PhDs). Where is it is written that white lab coats are the exclusive dress for MDs? I figure if someone wants to wear one to keep warmer, they could just as well do that.

Probably not written anywhere ('bout the lab coats), but neither is it written that a lot of nurses are very catty...It just is...
I do know that, years ago, my very first day teaching nursing clinicals (notice I did not say residency like that goofball in the SMU video), I was in a large, urban, teaching hospital, and wore a white lab coat (I was told to wear one by my dean) By lunchtime, at least a half a dozen people asked me what year resident I was (these were presumably residents and attendings, NOT patients...imagine the confusion of a patient).
After that first day, I ditched the coat for scrubs, end of story.

Hell, it's probably tradition for all I know (short vs long, wearing one vs not). I'm a nurse, and I'll wear scrubs. (Yes I know that some docs wear scrubs, but the (reverse) confusion is in no way dangerous for the patient)

Profs wearing them in the classroom is one thing, and a pharmacists in a pharmacy, behind the glass, is pretty clear what his/her role is. But an NP or PA introducing him/herself as 'doctor' wearing a lab coat, in an exam room, will deceive the patient, period. That's just reality...

For argument's sake, let's say there is no 'rule' or tradition...The patient's perception should matter. I've seen nurses/NPs/PAs confuse patients by wearing the coat...It's that simple, period.

Though your Mr. Miyagi example is a great post aday, (patient) perception should be what matters. And you can't tell me the DNP program director is just trying to 'keep warm' by wearing the lab coat. She sees herself, on some level, as a 'doctor'
 
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zenman

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Oh, I couldn't resist a quote from a PhD nurse on the site:
"I completed my BSN in Korea, came to the States to pursuit my MS and PhD at University of California, San Francisco."

Way to exercise that advanced education, 'doc' :laugh:

I guess you don't know the meaning of "ESL?" Give her a break.
 

chimichanga

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I guess you don't know the meaning of "ESL?" Give her a break.

She has her PhD dude...give ME a break...
I speak three languages, and have a huge respect for all three...I have done official written translations in all three for various hospitals, and I don't have a PhD or masters...
You can bet if I posted my personal statement on a website touting a doctoral program, the grammar would be correct...

When in Rome...
 
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zenman

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She has her PhD dude...give ME a break...
I speak three languages, and have a huge respect for all three...I have done official written translations in all three for various hospitals, and I don't have a PhD or masters...
You can bet if I posted my personal statement on a website touting a doctoral program, the grammar would be correct...

When in Rome...

Maybe she didn't write it herself. Having lived overseas and with a passport so thick you can hardly fit it in your pocket, plus having worked with 50 cultures, I still think some tolerance is in order. But that's just me.:D
 

adayatatime

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Fair enough. Have the nurses wear the emblazoned zippered sweaters given as gifts by the hospital each year. Then there won't be confusion about anything.

While we're on the topic of dress code, I'd love to be able to wear a beanie hat as it can get pretty cold for a bald dude on the unit. But I suppose that might just look a bit too "ghetto" for the DON and patients. Maybe I should just wear a surgical cap with a small pillow on the inside for insulation all day long.



Probably not written anywhere ('bout the lab coats), but neither is it written that a lot of nurses are very catty...It just is...
I do know that, years ago, my very first day teaching nursing clinicals (notice I did not say residency like that goofball in the SMU video), I was in a large, urban, teaching hospital, and wore a white lab coat (I was told to wear one by my dean) By lunchtime, at least a half a dozen people asked me what year resident I was (these were presumably residents and attendings, NOT patients...imagine the confusion of a patient).
After that first day, I ditched the coat for scrubs, end of story.

Hell, it's probably tradition for all I know (short vs long, wearing one vs not). I'm a nurse, and I'll wear scrubs. (Yes I know that some docs wear scrubs, but the (reverse) confusion is in no way dangerous for the patient)

Profs wearing them in the classroom is one thing, and a pharmacists in a pharmacy, behind the glass, is pretty clear what his/her role is. But an NP or PA introducing him/herself as 'doctor' wearing a lab coat, in an exam room, will deceive the patient, period. That's just reality...

For argument's sake, let's say there is no 'rule' or tradition...The patient's perception should matter. I've seen nurses/NPs/PAs confuse patients by wearing the coat...It's that simple, period.

Though your Mr. Miyagi example is a great post aday, (patient) perception should be what matters. And you can't tell me the DNP program director is just trying to 'keep warm' by wearing the lab coat. She sees herself, on some level, as a 'doctor'
 

ChillyRN

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There are legitimate issues for discussion about the DNP. The white coat thing is just foolishness.
 

Therapist4Chnge

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While we're on the topic of dress code, I'd love to be able to wear a beanie hat as it can get pretty cold for a bald dude on the unit. But I suppose that might just look a bit too "ghetto" for the DON and patients. Maybe I should just wear a surgical cap with a small pillow on the inside for insulation all day long.


skullcap.jpg
 

FireCloud9

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New programs are emerging in the Sacramento, CA area. Are you seeing any new programs in your part of the country?

New DNP
New Bachelors / MS / PhD in Nursing:


Unfortunately, I'm not seeing any new PA programs emerging in the region.

Ok boys and girls, I was just asking if you're seeing any new programs in your neck of the woods because I'd be interested in hearing about them.
 

chimichanga

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Ok boys and girls, I was just asking if you're seeing any new programs in your neck of the woods because I'd be interested in hearing about them.

my apologies...I take full responsibility for derailing your thread and it's original question...

Haven't seen any in AZ crop up (thankfully) :oops:
 

mig26x

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Daniel-san: You have a brown belt, Mr. Miyagi?
Miyagi-sensei: Why, yes, Daniel-san!
Daniel-san: Wow! Gee whiz! Can I see it!
Miyagi-sensei: Sure. (Lifts of up cheap leather belt holding cheap slacks up). $2.99 from JCPenney. Miyagi like very much.
Daniel-san: Hey, that's not what I meant! I want to see the belt that shows your qualified to kick butt!
Miyagi-sensei: Belt meant to hold up pants. Nothing more, Daniel-san. No need belt to kick butt.

+++

Just adapt this to the full length white coat and derive your own moral.

what a freaking lie!!!! a 2.99 dollar belt at jcpenney? who are you kidding??? LOL.
 
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