rom3o

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Hello,
Now I'm sure this forum gets numerous new members every day, so there isn't enough time to welcome everyone. Like many other forums, this forum doesn't seem to have a "Newcomer" section. But let's just forget about all that and let me just say a bit about myself, I also have a few questions I'd like to ask. Basically the only information I'd like to reveal about myself is that I'm 18, entering college as a freshman this year, and that I live in VA. For the past few years I've really become interested in the sciences (took a pretty heavy load of science in HS) and particularly becoming a doctor as a career. Now I haven't the slightest clue all the pain and anguish you all have been going through... it seems tough so let me just say that I admire you all for putting through with all this... hopefully one day I'll be in the same shoes as you guys. Now for my question: I'm not going to that big or famous of a school (just some hick Virginian college probably) but I've been doing tons of reading to try and help me figure out if being a doctor is really what I'd like to do... so far it seems very interesting and I'm up to the challenge. I read an interesting article onhow to become a doctor, it was very interesting and helped to clear away some of the fog. Now I know each college/medical school have their own requirements for graduation/entrance but I was wondering what you all think is the ideal class schedule for the college freshman (I've been having a hard time deciding what I would like to take). I'm sure this varies from person to person, and I even read somewhere that it's probably better to take some of your science courses towards your junior/senior years so that the information is still fresh in your head for the MCAT, what do you guys suggest for the freshman year? And it would really be great if you could post what you took your freshman year.
Thanks,
romeo
 

Celestron2000

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Welcome, :)
As for classes fresh. year is a good time to get most of your distribution requierments out of the way. One advantage of this is that taking multiple subjects can help you to settle on a major. Take some of the basic pre-req.s in your area of interest, but also be open and consider your options. I think it can be a mistake to lock your self into a major too early in the game (especially if you're going to a liberal arts college).
Good luck
 

lesstalkmorock

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Welcome Romeo!
As a newcomer myself, let me extend my help and advice to you. If you are really serious about being a doctor, during your freshman year of college you must accomplish all of the following at the very LEAST

1) take 4 upper-division courses
2) start a research project and publish in a mid-level journal
3) garner clinical experience through volunteering at a local clinic
4) volunteer at a large hospital, homeless shelter, retirement home, aids clinic
5) join the peace corps
6) travel to somalia
7) become a teaching assistant
8) create a course and teach it (may be put off to 2nd year)
9) be on a first name basis with 4 science professors; have dinner with all of them (this is for LORs)
10) become president of 1 campus organization (or VP of two)
11) help with a congressional campaign
12) join symphony orchestra
13) join at least 4 national honor societies
14) found a nonprofit
15) start studying for the MCAT
16) shadow 3 doctors
17) read the lancet on a daily basis
18) wear scrubs
19) less than 10 hours sleep/week
20) ignore everything above and just enjoy your first year of FREEDOM

any questions, pm me
 

TheRussian

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I think it's important to spread out you pre-med requirements over the first three years if you plan on applying to med school right after college. Personally I took general chem first year, bio and orgo second year, and physics third year. I know it may seem daunting to take two hardcore sciences at the same time but it is really not that bad and the med schools want to see that you can take a serious courseload. I also recommend that you take calc if you have to or some other higher level math course. Other than that take intro classes or general requirements.
Though it is important not to lock yourself in a major too soon, it would take the stress of if you have some idea at the end of freshman/beginning of sophmore year so that you can plan out the remaining years. With good planning you can accomplish a lot with out an outrageous work load. I was able to get 3 majors and a minor only taking 5 and 1/2 courses only one semester, 3 and 1/2 two semesters, and 3 this semester. The rest were 4 (lab counts as a half at our school)
 

Syranope2

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my college didn't have any basic requirements that i had to get rid of my freshman year, so i took my general chemistry, a biology class, and a math class to start fulfilling my premed requirements. i was also very sure of my major when i entered college, so i didn't need to experiment as much with some classes to see where i wanted to focus, so if you're unsure of what you'd like to major in, i'd definitely recommend taking a few out-there classes just to see if you're interested. oh, also, i don't like english, so i took an english class to get one of my two english credits for premed out of the way. overall, i guess, try to get a small chunk of science classes out of the way, especially those that will be prereq's for the more advanced science classes you want to take in the coming years.
 
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rom3o

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Originally posted by lesstalkmorock
Welcome Romeo!
As a newcomer myself, let me extend my help and advice to you. If you are really serious about being a doctor, during your freshman year of college you must accomplish all of the following at the very LEAST

1) take 4 upper-division courses
2) start a research project and publish in a mid-level journal
3) garner clinical experience through volunteering at a local clinic
4) volunteer at a large hospital, homeless shelter, retirement home, aids clinic
5) join the peace corps
6) travel to somalia
7) become a teaching assistant
8) create a course and teach it (may be put off to 2nd year)
9) be on a first name basis with 4 science professors; have dinner with all of them (this is for LORs)
10) become president of 1 campus organization (or VP of two)
11) help with a congressional campaign
12) join symphony orchestra
13) join at least 4 national honor societies
14) found a nonprofit
15) start studying for the MCAT
16) shadow 3 doctors
17) read the lancet on a daily basis
18) wear scrubs
19) less than 10 hours sleep/week
20) ignore everything above and just enjoy your first year of FREEDOM

any questions, pm me
Well it was very convincing until I saw number five :p

Thank you all for your advice, and I hope to continue posting my questions in this forum for a while.
romeo
 
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rom3o

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What can I say, I've always had a tough time detecting sarcasm... :rolleyes: I'm a serious guy!
 

Trekkie963

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Originally posted by rom3o
I'm a serious guy!
Being serious is fine, just please, for the love of God, don't be an anal pre-med. You are just a freshman...there's time to change...go get drunk or something...for all of us...

:horns:
 

DrBodacious

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Since you seem to be motivated and interested in science, I'd suggest taking your science pre-reqs during your first two years. That's two science classes per semester for the first two years. This will help you in a few significant ways:

1) You'll be more competitive for an intership after your 2nd or 3rd year.

2) These classes will make you better prepared to do research.

3) You can take a couple upper level classes like physiology, biochem, or microbiology your 3rd year. Even though these classses aren't required for the MCAT, they help tie toghether information. The more you know for the MCAT the better. Moreover, you could potentially take the MCAT during the Aug of the year before you apply, which IMO is the ideal time to take it.

4) If you go the April MCAT route, you won't have to sneak in pre-reqs during your second Junior year semseter. Having a light course load for MCAT prep is very helpful, and you must plan ahead if you want to make that happen.

Med schools do like to see upper level non-science courses as well, so don't opt for the easy classes all the time.
 

DrBodacious

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to the OP:

I don't think you are being anal. Planning out your schedule is a smart move. If you can plan it out now, you'll have less to worry about later on and you can have more free time/less stress.
 

Delphium

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I am new, however unlike you my arrival hearkens a new era of SDN! The age of Disco Stu is upon us, brace yourselves!
 

DrBodacious

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Originally posted by Delphium
I am new, however unlike you my arrival hearkens a new era of SDN! The age of Disco Stu is upon us, brace yourselves!
Oooo goodie, a new eccentric member! I can't wait to see what you bring us Disco Stu!! :hardy: :horns: :hardy: :horns:
 

medicomel

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Hey there,

Start off slow and then escalate with the pre-reqs. If you read through the C- thread, you'll learn that a lot of us here had a freshman year peppered with some low grades. So take that into consideraton as you settle into college life, away from mom and dad. It takes a little while to get adjusted to setting your own schedule and balancing time for work and play.

Good luck!
 

lesstalkmorock

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how presumptuous.

to say that all ambitious freshmen are anal dorks with no lives is to say that all doctors are lame old men with no sex drive. come on. give the guy a break. i'm sure we all remember our first days in college. get a life for all of us? speak for yourself... i have a life.

anyway, i'm going to go enjoy my friday night like the little anal premed bitch i am. whos with me? happy friday :clap: :clap:

cheers! :p