New medical schools and residencies.

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by Obnoxious Dad, Dec 28, 2008.

  1. Obnoxious Dad

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    As some of you know there are four new medical schools opening their doors this fall. They are Texas Tech El Paso, Commonwealth, Florida International and Central Florida. In 2010 Oakland and Hofstra may also open new schools. Do you think the graduates of these new schools will be severely handicapped when it comes to the residency match? I realize that ortho at UCSF will be out of the question but what about something like OB GYN at Pitt or internal medicine at Wisconsin?:confused:
     
  2. medsRus

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    They will fill the shortage in primary care...
     
  3. medicinesux

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    by FORCIBLY (with Sallie Mae being your pimp) working 70 hr weeks at under a 100K a year with 300K in student debt at 7% fixed interest rates! Can you say financial ruin??? Welcome to capitalistic America where the older generation will gladly screw over the younger generation to make a cent.

    Hofstra! Are you effing me? This cesspool of a school, Hofstra, now wants to get in the game and open up a med school too??? Soon we are going to be hearing about the grand opening of Orange, Dade, Harris, or Bronx County Community College of Medicine. These greedy bastards involved in opening these schools should be brought behind the barn and shot now like some mad shaking cow before inducing their misery on untold others.
     
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    #3 medicinesux, Dec 28, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2008
  4. RussianJoo

    RussianJoo Useless Member
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    I don't think grads from these new schools have anything to worry about. They're going to be american grads which is a million times better then being a foreign grad. And I have heard of plenty of foreign grads get some quality residencies. Sure coming from a brand new school will be rough but as long as their board scores are competitive they won't be effected too much, and if their scores are high might even get Ortho at UCSF. Foriegn grads on the other hand won't even get their application looked at at places like that, no matter how high their board scores are.
     
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  5. dragonfly99

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    dad,
    I think "severely handicapped" is probably an overstatement....and I don't know that ortho at UCSF would be totally out of the question. It would be very hard, no doubt, but if the person is @top of his class at one of those new schools, did medical research related to ortho, has great evaluations from surgeons and high scores on the US med licensing exam Part 1, he'd be in a better position than a kid from Stanford in the bottom 1/3 of his class. No doubt about that.

    IM at Wisconsin...or IM anywhere but some famous medical school would not be a problem. For students in the top 1/3 of the class then could do IM at a well known university hospital.

    OB/Gyn right now isn't that competitive of a specialty to get into either.

    In the ideal world, one wants to be a Harvard med school grad from top 1/3 of the class, but very few will be able to do that. In the end you have to fight and scrap for what you want, and sometimes you cannot have all you want...but can often get an approximation if you are willing to sacrifice.

    I would prefer going to any of these new schools vs. going to another country to get a medical education, which is difficult in more ways than one. I think with any school (domestic or foreign, public or private), the old adage "let the buyer beware" applies. Most all med schools can put ona good show during the interview, but finding out the straight dope about the teaching at many schools can be more challenging.
     
  6. medsRus

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    Perhaps, if applying to competitive spots/specialties.

    Well, not quite. IMGs have landed essentially everything -- nothing is impossible. Having no history (i.e. alumni), reputation, poor clinical affiliations, and/or being guinea pigs, I could imagine that these guys will fill in the primary care spots -- which is a great thing.
     
  7. RussianJoo

    RussianJoo Useless Member
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    I would think as long as their profs are well known and they have solid board scores and do their rotations in solid hospitals and not some run down community hospitals than the whole guinea pig thing can easily be overlooked.

    and about IMGs being in every specialty you're correct about that but very few imgs get very competitive specialties nowadays. Even after scoring 260 on step1 MGH will still not interview you, just because they don't interview IMGs. Being a US grad opens a large number of doors to you. And in the end what other options will the OP have? Going to a DO school or going to a well established Carib school.
     
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  8. Zondeare

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    I don't think that they will be at much of a disadvantage at all.

    I can't speak for all of the schools, but I do have some experience with the new school opening in El Paso. I'm a UT Southwestern grad from 2008 and know when I was interviewing for med school (in 2003), the administrators in TX were all talking about the new school. The hospitals have had 3-4th year med students in them for at least 2 years (from texas tech i believe) and the administration from the new el paso school has connections at least to UTSW.

    The people in place are not new people unknown to the medical world. They have planned and organized and practiced and acheived enough to get themselves accredited.

    Now, the curriculum still may need polishing and the student affairs center may not work well... but as long as the student who is there studies and works hard, I feel like they have almost as much potential at a new school as an old one... maybe even more potential because some medical schools have very poor reputations. It's starting out on the right foot:)
     

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