new mexico situation

Discussion in 'Psychiatry' started by enthusiastic, Nov 14, 2002.

  1. enthusiastic

    enthusiastic Junior Member

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    is it only a matter of time before every psychiatrist in new mexico is run out of the state by the psychologists who are allowed to prescribe? how will this affect university of new mexico's residency training? i guess one should plan to leave after their training if they match there? thanks.
     
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  3. Magree

    Magree Senior Member
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    Hi:

    If I were you I'd try to contact some psychiatrists in NM to see what their feelings/"take" on the situation is. I know some people who've said they wouldn't go there for that reason but I think their decision might be a bit extreme - if you like it there and you like psych I'm sure you can find a niche. Good luck!

    M-
     
  4. I asked my program director at my school about that. His take, at least, is that New Mexico is hurting for mental health care very badly and giving Ph.Ds Rx rights was a way to fill that need. But it is only the tip of the iceberg. There is still way more demand for mental health care in New Mexico than all the psychiatrists and psychologist can handle combined. The numbers were outrageous something like 1600:1.
     
  5. gyri

    gyri Member
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    regarding the situation in NM...

    there is a severe shortage of mental health providers in this state--psychiatrists will continue to be very much in demand, according to a knowledgeable member of the field... furthermore, I've heard that thus far, psychologists here are not exactly clamoring to get prescription privileges--they have to go through additional training, and I've heard several say that it just isn't worth the hassle...

    there's my two cents, from an NM local, for what it's worth (and that might be less than two cents)
     
  6. enthusiastic

    enthusiastic Junior Member

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    i heard that the shortage of psychiatrists in new mexico (other than the poor location) is due to the very low salary level as compared to the rest of the US. is this true for texas and arizona as well? does anyone have any figures that they know of? thanks.
     
  7. gyri

    gyri Member
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    I have heard that salaries are indeed lower here, but I don't know numbers--sorry. Keep in mind that the cost of living is also considerably lower here than in most other metropolitan areas.

    Not sure what you mean by "poor location." Have you been to New Mexico? It's absolutely gorgeous, with weather that can't be beat. If you like to be outdoors, it's hard to find a better place that permits year-round hiking, etc., in fantastic mountains. It has four seasons, too, unlike southern California, for example. No oppressive humidity (though the summers do get HOT.) Culturally, the state is very rich as well. And you don't have nearly the congestion that you do in many other parts of the country (yet.) This is not to say that living in NM doesn't have its drawbacks. Of course it does. But as my husband and I are scouting around for residency locations, with weather, cost of living, and cultural diversity being important criteria to us, we keep on coming back to a growing appreciation of what is in our own backyard, so to speak.
     
  8. enthusiastic

    enthusiastic Junior Member

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    sorry, didn't mean to offend you. i meant poor as in not much diversity except for alot of hispanic people, and no major sports teams (sorry i'm not much of a hiker or a nature person). is not knowing spanish going to be a handicap? thanks for the info, sorry again.
     
  9. gyri

    gyri Member
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    No worries!

    Spanish is definitely helpful and frequently used, but there are plenty of students and residents who don't speak it. You can easily get a translator (official or unofficial,) and there are also opportunities to learn medical Spanish if you are so inclined.

    You are certainly right about the dearth of major sports teams... supposedly we are going to pick up another AAA baseball team one of these days (Dukes used to be the AAA team for the Dodgers,) and Lobo basketball (college) has a lot of diehard fans. There is also ice hockey, but I can't say I've ever been to a game, so I don't know what kind of crowd they draw.

    In addition to Hispanic people, there are also numerous native American cultures, both urban and rural. In Albuquerque, there is also a significant Vietnamese community, with lots of restaurants, stores, etc. Nothing compared with a really big city, of course, but perhaps more diverse than one might expect.
     
  10. enthusiastic

    enthusiastic Junior Member

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    thanks again,

    one other concern according to a friend that lived there is that there is a high crime rate b/c of the high rate of substance abuse in albuquerque? also, which months are unbearable in terms of weather? thanks again gyri.
     

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