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Awesome new tool introduced by Doximity and US News & World Report that ranks residency programs. You can find the top 10 programs by specialty here: (member personal blog URL removed by Admin per TOS),

The original residency navigator tool: https://www.doximity.com/residency_navigator/programs

Great information for medical students as they apply for residencies. You can find basic info about each program such as contact info, alum info, board pass rate, subspecialization, etc.
 
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Law2Doc

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This would maybe be useful info if (1) residents were the appropriate resource for determining how to rank a progrm ( as compared to PDs, impressions of those actully in practice), and (2) you could demonstrate that doximity is a representative group. (bearing in mind that while 17,000 respondents to a survey sounds like a lot, there are something like 90,000 residents out there and who knows how many recent alumni surveyed, so we are likely talking single digit response rate).

I think you probably come up short on both counts. It's not inconceivable that the "surprises" on this list were just programs more aggressive about having their residents and recent alumni sign up for doximity and complete the survey. Or maybe they were just bigger programs with more residents and recent alumni to start with.

Anyway it's a nice play to try and fill a void and be the residency equivalent of a barrons or msar. But I think it's never going to be the equivalent of good word of mouth from someone actually plugged into a specialty (residents really aren't and actually know very little about other programs -- this happens later when they actually start working with grads from other programs, or better yet start hiring them). So good idea, but questionable implementation.

All it really tells us is what we already knew -- that the people at big name places like to claim to anyone who will listen (including doximity) that they are best. There are absolutely residents at certain programs for the name. Or that some places actively encourage residents and alumni to fill out surveys while others don't, The hidden secrets conversely are okay with being hidden secrets.

Not sure how any of this helps med students unless you blindly like to buy what people not yet even working independently in the field are selling.
 
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SouthernSurgeon

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This would maybe be useful info if (1) residents were the appropriate resource for determining how to rank a progrm ( as compared to PDs, impressions of those actully in practice), and (2) you could demonstrate that doximity is a representative group,

I think you probably come up short on both counts. It's not inconceivable that the "surprises" on this list were just programs more aggressive about having their residents and recent alumni sign up for doximity and complete the survey. Or maybe they were just bigger programs with more residents and recent alumni to start with.

Anyway it's a nice play to try and fill a void and be the residency equivalent of a barrons or msar. But I think it's never going to be the equivalent of good word of mouth from someone actually plugged into a specialty (residents really aren't and actually know very little about other programs -- this happens later when they actually start working with grads from other programs, or better yet start hiring them). So good idea, but questionable implementation.

All it really tells us is what we already knew -- that the people at big name places like to claim to anyone who will listen (including doximity) that they are best. There are absolutely residents at certain programs for the name. The hidden secrets conversely are okay with being hidden secrets.
I don't think residents were eligible to participate in the survey. The methodology says "doximity members with eligible board certification". I'm a resident and was on doximity and never got an invite to participate. My program certainly never mentioned anything about it.

There is also a dedicated column with PD nominations suggesting they did put extra weight behind PDs views. They also claim this is not just a survey result but a combination of the survey and "objective" data (which they aren't transparent on exactly what data that was or how it was weighted).
 

Law2Doc

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I don't think residents were eligible to participate in the survey. The methodology says "doximity members with eligible board certification". I'm a resident and was on doximity and never got an invite to participate. My program certainly never mentioned anything about it.).
The linked article says they "surveyed CURRENT and former residents." I'm taking that assertion at face value. That you didn't get invited to do the survey strengthens my argument that maybe this wasn't a representative group.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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The linked article says they "surveyed CURRENT and former residents." I'm taking that assertion at face value. That you didn't get invited to do the survey strengthens my argument that maybe this wasn't a representative group.
The article was written by some blogger I've never heard of who started this thread for click bait.

This is what Doximity's website says about it:

survey population was open to all Doximity member physicians with eligible board certifications
I agree with your larger concern about the doximity population not necessarily representing the overall population, especially depending on the survey response rate among eligible doximity members (which I haven't seen published)
 

Law2Doc

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The article was written by some blogger I've never heard of who started this thread for click bait.

This is what Doximity's website says about it:



I agree with your larger concern about the doximity population not necessarily representing the overall population, especially depending on the survey response rate among eligible doximity members (which I haven't seen published)
While that's somewhat better, you'd still have to be sure they have representative respondents from every specialty, so suddenly the 17,000 figure might be less than 1000 from a specialty with hundreds of thousands of members. Wouldn't be hard to get badly skewed info when you are dealing with the fraction of a Percent of the specialty's opinion, and subselecting those on doximity in the first place. It's likely just bad statistical methodology no matter how you slice it.
 
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DermViser

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The article was written by some blogger I've never heard of who started this thread for click bait.
More like a blogger whose proud of her Dermatology residency program getting #1 on Doximity - NYU. Her blog is Tea with MD, hence her user name. She doesn't own the rank list - Doximity does. I think it's helpful for applicants to see it along with the methodology. More information is never bad.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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I think it's helpful for applicants to see it along with the methodology. More information is never bad.
I wish they were more clear with their methodology. The pdf on the website is less than revealing.

I agree with L2D that limiting the survey to the doximity community immediately introduces significant bias.
 
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DermViser

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I wish they were more clear with their methodology. The pdf on the website is less than revealing.

I agree with L2D that limiting the survey to the doximity community immediately introduces significant bias.
How? In theory it has every resident or attending with a medical license in Doximity. You only get full access to the list if you register with Doximity - so it's obviously a way to get you to register, if you're that curious.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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How? In theory it has every resident or attending with a medical license in Doximity. You only get full access to the list if you register with Doximity - so it's obviously a way to get you to register, if you're that curious.
I don't mean limiting access to the survey results...

I mean the survey population itself.

The way they conducted their survey was by emailing doximity members (and having a prompt to fill it out upon login). So unless you accept that the doximity community accurately reflects the larger physician community as a whole, that is an immediate source of bias in their methodology.
 

DermViser

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I don't mean limiting access to the survey results...

I mean the survey population itself.

The way they conducted their survey was by emailing doximity members (and having a prompt to fill it out upon login). So unless you accept that the doximity community accurately reflects the larger physician community as a whole, that is an immediate source of bias in their methodology.
Yes, me too. They probably sent it to registered Doximity users at the time they did the survey. A Doximity page for every physician who enters the workforce from residency onwards is automatically made when you graduate. If you haven't registered or not with your specialty, then you're not likely to receive one.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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Yes, me too. They probably sent it to registered Doximity users at the time they did the survey. A Doximity page for every physician who enters the workforce from residency onwards is automatically made when you graduate. If you haven't registered or not with your specialty, then you're not likely to receive one.
I know that doximity creates dummy pages for everyone. It's how they make ridiculous claims that >80% of US physicians are on doximity.

But I think we all know that the percentage of active users is very very different.
 

DermViser

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I know that doximity creates dummy pages for everyone. It's how they make ridiculous claims that >80% of US physicians are on doximity.

But I think we all know that the percentage of active users is very very different.
Yes, I know. However, the active users are verifying who they are. The Doximity rankings tell how many people voted, how many were PDs. The only way more I would think they could split it up is by academia/community, resident/attending, etc. Seems quite transparent to me.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.doximity.com/mediakit/Doximity_Residency_Navigator_Survey_Methodology.pdf
 
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SouthernSurgeon

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Yes, I know. However, the active users are verifying who they are. The Doximity rankings tell how many people voted, how many were PDs. The only way more I would think they could split it up is by academia/community, resident/attending, etc. Seems quite transparent to me.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.doximity.com/mediakit/Doximity_Residency_Navigator_Survey_Methodology.pdf
They are transparent about how many people voted in the survey, sure.

But they state that the rankings are not based on the survey alone.

The methodology is described as a combination of "objective data" (no clarification on what objective data), survey results , and "proprietary doximity profile data" (no clarification on what that means). They don't give any information on how they weighted these various factors or what they are. So the rankings basically came out of a black box that includes a survey and a bunch of other stuff.
 

Raryn

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I'm pretty skeptical about their data. I looked at the IM rankings for the CA programs for example, and they (rightly so) have UCSF/Stanford/UCLA-Reagan ranked on top, and after that the rankings are laughable. Absolutely laughable.

Even their lists of alumni and where they end up seems screwy. It seems to be missing a large portion of the alumni of my program that I personally know where they ended up. Not only that, but it lists several of our current residents as alumni. I can't gauge how far off their subspecialization #s are, but it also seems off.
 
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All that matters should be:
1. Job location after residency
2. Income post residency
3. For those that like research, high-impact papers published by residents and strength of academic center that one works at after residency
4. Quality of fellowships available
5. Board pass rates

Women lie. Men lie. Numbers don't lie.

upload_2014-9-12_8-2-41.png
 
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Winged Scapula

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More like a blogger whose proud of her Dermatology residency program getting #1 on Doximity - NYU. Her blog is Tea with MD, hence her user name. She doesn't own the rank list - Doximity does. I think it's helpful for applicants to see it along with the methodology. More information is never bad.
That's kind of you to think so. But since she's been shilling her blog all over SDN since she registered, I think SouthernIM might be correct. Remember people can make money from clicks to their blogs.
 

SouthernSurgeon

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Even their lists of alumni and where they end up seems screwy. It seems to be missing a large portion of the alumni of my program that I personally know where they ended up. Not only that, but it lists several of our current residents as alumni. I can't gauge how far off their subspecialization #s are, but it also seems off.
I assume the alumni lists (and feeder school, etc) are solely derived from doximity member profiles. So their accuracy is limited to just active users of doximity who have filled out their profile with that information
 

Law2Doc

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How? In theory it has every resident or attending with a medical license in Doximity. You only get full access to the list if you register with Doximity - so it's obviously a way to get you to register, if you're that curious.
Um the vast vast majority of all physicians aren't registered on doximity. Most probably haven't heard of it. I only just heard of it about a month ago. So those who are on it are a select group from whom all data is by definition skewed.
 

DermViser

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Um the vast vast majority of all physicians aren't registered on doximity. Most probably haven't heard of it. I only just heard of it about a month ago. So those who are on it are a select group from whom all data is by definition skewed.
All residents and attendings have a dummy page made for them on Doximity. Obviously once you register you get the survey. I also said that for transparency purposes the numbers could be cut up further into academic vs. community. According to their PDF they only survey board certified physicians in that specialty.
 

link2swim06

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Um the vast vast majority of all physicians aren't registered on doximity. Most probably haven't heard of it. I only just heard of it about a month ago. So those who are on it are a select group from whom all data is by definition skewed.
I can't believe I'm agreeing with law2doc...but yep...there is no way this is even remotely representative of 'all practicing physicians.'