Dec 5, 2010
2
0
Status
Hi everyone!

I just signed on a minute ago so I can ask this question to all the aspiring eardocs. I am 27 years old. I received my bachelors in accounting and I have a 3.8 GPA. Ever since then I have been seriously considering something totally different such as going medical. Audiology seems very exciting.

I am uninformed so here are some very basic questions. Can I get into audiology school with the degree I have? Must I first have completed classes in specific areas such as physics, chem etc. I only took the accounting requirements which are all business....

Also, how long is Aud school, and once completed what comes next?
What kind of exams and testing are there?
How hard is it relative to other medical paths?
Is there any way to do it part time?
Can any part of schooling be done online?
What exactly is studied in Aud school, do you intern too?
How hard is it to find jobs afterward?
How much is the total cost?

Im sure anyone in this forum can answer all these questions quite easily.

Thanks!
 
May 18, 2010
507
0
Treasure Valley, Idaho
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Welcome to the forum!

An accounting major showing interest in audiology isn't the most common thing but I guess it can happen, huh? You will need to complete prerequisites before applying to a program, or select a program which offers those prerequisites along-side your graduate level courses (I don't know which do this but you can ask around). Some universities have a short program, I know mine has a one or two year (maybe 3 semester?) program which prepares you for a graduate degree.

An AuD takes 4 years to complete, 1 of which is your externship. After that you must pass certification tests (most programs boast a 100% pass-rate) and then you're a practicing doc! I think the test is the Praxis but I'm not sure. I think the difficulty depends on your interests. I would be totally lost in a regular medical school, but when I can focus on just the ear I end up at the top of the class.

I don't think that there are any part-time graduate programs in audiology but I could be wrong! I do know that there are online programs, though. They tend to be more expensive and sometimes more competitive, but they're a good choice if you need to keep working.

You study... audiology in audiology school. I'm not sure how to explain that better. You might rent an audiology textbook from Chegg.com and read through it to see if you're still interested. That would be the cheapest way of 'trying before you buy', I think. The job outlook is great for audiology because guess what happens every 7 seconds? A Baby Boomer turns 60! Total cost really depends on the program and whether or not you get financial aid or an assistanceship, etc.

Any other questions?
 
OP
D
Dec 5, 2010
2
0
Status
Thanks for answering all those questions for me. Here are some more:

Why is Aud considered a rehabilitation science like OT and PT and not like any other real physician?

Also, can you list the specific courses needed to be taken before getting admitted to Aud school?

And, how hard is it to get into Aud school?

Do you need to relocate?

What courses do you take in aud school?

Thanks tons!
 
Nov 13, 2010
111
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Thanks for answering all those questions for me. Here are some more:

Why is Aud considered a rehabilitation science like OT and PT and not like any other real physician?

Also, can you list the specific courses needed to be taken before getting admitted to Aud school?

And, how hard is it to get into Aud school?

Do you need to relocate?

What courses do you take in aud school?

Thanks tons!
We treat and diagnose hearing loss and balance deficiencies...not the cause. Only a medical doctor can diagnose the reason for the hearing loss or the reason for the balance disorder. We are taught the signs and symptoms of balance and hearing disorders, but we can only postulate what it may be caused by not anything specific. That is reserved for a medical doctor. If the physician decides that there is nothing medically that they could treat the problem with (surgery, antibiotics, etc.) then we will see the patient back for aural rehabilitation and/or vestibular rehabilitation in some cases. This involves much more than slapping on hearing aids, it is about teaching the patient to live with their hearing loss, be advocates for themselves, and learning how to use assistive listening devices like hearing aids, amplified telephones, and FM systems.---This makes us specialists in rehabilitation, not medical specialists

Each school has their own pre-reqs. For University of Arizona, entry to the Au.D. program requires an earned bachelor’s degree. Applicants should have completed at least 6 semester hours in each of these areas:

Biological and/or physical sciences
Mathematics and/or statistics
Behavioral and/or social sciences (psychology, sociology or other courses of normal and abnormal human behavior)
Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
English

I came in from a non-speech/hearing bkgd so I had to take some other specific pre-reqs required in this program, but I was able to fit them in without a problem. So check with the schools some will have a more flexible schedule than others.

AuD schools are traditionally competitive. There are the top schools, and then mid level schools, and then schools that are less competitive. Generally, most people apply to about 5-10 schools throughout the range of schools.

On the relocation--it completely depends on where you get in.

Classes differ by school, but here is a taste of what I have taken: Advanced Audiological Rehabilitation, Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants, Electrophysiology--Auditory Brainstem Response/Otoacoustic Emissions, Electrophysiology--Cortical Evoked Potentials, Vestibular Testing/Rehabilitation, ,Tinnitus, Hearing Disorders, Genetics, Pharmacology, Pediatric Audiology, Neurophysiology, Anatomy and Physiology of the Auditory and Vestibular System, Business in Audiology, Labs in most of those classes, clinic each semester rotating throughout the area, and then work on a thesis project.

**This is not all of them but that is the grand majority**
 
May 18, 2010
507
0
Treasure Valley, Idaho
Status
Rehab Sci Student
We treat and diagnose hearing loss and balance deficiencies...not the cause.
^ That, and also politics.

Yes, each program has its own pre-requisites. If you are deciding to take the courses individually instead of taking a preparatory program, I would check with the programs you're interested in. Ultimately, you'll be safest taking an actual program and it'll probably work out to the same amount of time anyway.

And, how hard is it to get into Aud school?
That entirely depends on the school but overall you can't be a slacker. That said, I doubt you can be a slacker in any graduate program. If you're more interested in getting your degree than having prestige, you shouldn't have a problem getting into a program. If you care about where you get your degree, you may have to work harder. If you get into a program, you'll need to live near it while you're going to classes or commute... I don't get what you're asking unless you're getting at the online program issue again, but I already answered that.



I haven't had any graduate-level courses yet so I can't answer your last question.
 

AudioEngineer

Au.D. Student - ATSU 2014
Jun 9, 2010
30
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Can I get into audiology school with the degree I have?
Yes. There are schools, like mine (ATSU in Arizona) that will take and even like non-traditional applicants. They feel that having students from all backgrounds builds a better cohort. It will require a few courses, mostly along the lines of Biologies and other sciences. Some schools require a year of full time work. Others, like ATSU, require basic sciences and teach everyone the same from there.

Also, how long is Aud school, and once completed what comes next?
Is there any way to do it part time?
Can any part of schooling be done online?
AuD is a 4 year doctorate, which incorporates didactic (lecture/study) coursework and practical rotations and externship. Each year ans school varies but the 4th year is mostly externship.

All current doctorate programs that I know of are full-time residential programs. A few online programs exist for current masters level audiologists to "upgrade" their degree. The programs are residential due to hands-on requirements of medical and allied health professional schools. They cannot teach patient care from a distance.

How hard is it to find jobs afterward?
How much is the total cost?
Most audiology externs (4th year students) stay on as full staff at their extern location or another facility they have built a relationship in the area. Audiology is growing as fast as they can crank out students, so the prospects are good. I have never heard of an involuntarily unemployed audiologist. I know our school has never had a graduate that was unemployed (outside of maternity leave).

I hope this helps. Good luck on your search.