Halcyon32

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I've been looking up what's been removed for the new MCAT and what stuck out to me the most was that I saw in several places that simple organic compounds (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes), aromatic compounds, ethers, and amines are no longer tested. From what I can tell some of these, alkanes and such especially, seem pretty integral to orgo and being able to answer some questions. When these sources claim that these topics are removed do they mean that we still ought to know them but specific questions about them (for example, special properties, cycloalkanes, combustions, halogenation, etc.) are removed? Also, for those who have already taken the 2015 MCAT did any of you see the topics I listed tested to any degree? Thanks in advance!
 

ChrisMack390

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My test was very light on organic chemistry. Its a mixed bag though, others have reported differently.
 

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I've been looking up what's been removed for the new MCAT and what stuck out to me the most was that I saw in several places that simple organic compounds (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes), aromatic compounds, ethers, and amines are no longer tested. From what I can tell some of these, alkanes and such especially, seem pretty integral to orgo and being able to answer some questions. When these sources claim that these topics are removed do they mean that we still ought to know them but specific questions about them (for example, special properties, cycloalkanes, combustions, halogenation, etc.) are removed? Also, for those who have already taken the 2015 MCAT did any of you see the topics I listed tested to any degree? Thanks in advance!
Alkenes, alkynes, and benzene have been gone for over ten years. They were removed in 2004. Alkanes may not be tested, but do not be fooled in thinking the concepts are not found in biology. Cell membrane fluidity is not more than alkene vs. alkane packing. Antioxidants are free-radical scavengers. There is still hydrocarbon chemistry on the MCAT, just in an applied to biology format.
 

ChrisMack390

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Can't go into specifics, but I definitely had a question about an alkene on my test last weekend.
 
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Halcyon32

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Alkenes, alkynes, and benzene have been gone for over ten years. They were removed in 2004. Alkanes may not be tested, but do not be fooled in thinking the concepts are not found in biology. Cell membrane fluidity is not more than alkene vs. alkane packing. Antioxidants are free-radical scavengers. There is still hydrocarbon chemistry on the MCAT, just in an applied to biology format.
But those reactions like halogenation, mercuration/demercuration, hydrogenation, grignard reagents, stuff like that are removed? That's more of what i meant in regards to the specifics about alkanes nad alkenes and such
 

ChrisMack390

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I will second what @vesicaring said - I had very minimal orgo on my test overall. Doesn't mean you can't end up with more though.
 
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Halcyon32

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I will second what @vesicaring said - I had very minimal orgo on my test overall. Doesn't mean you can't end up with more though.
It's just that up until recently I had old prep books that were for the old MCAT and was studying with those and it seemed to cover a lot of topics that weren't on the new MCAT content list. Now, I have the EK set for 2015 and it feels like they slashed so much stuff about orgo and don't even have a book for orgo. just a few chapters some orgo stuff in the gen chem book. or maybe its not even just the gen chem book anymore but the chem book for both orgo and gen. I just don't know anymore, I'll study whatever's in the EK book and check if there's other stuff on the content list from AAMC
 

ChrisMack390

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The tests are all different, but from what I saw on mine studying a lot of gen chem and biochem and a little orgo and physics would be the way to go.
 
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When we redesigned the science portion of our lecture course, we omitted two physics lectures, converted two and a half of the organic chemistry lectures to biochemistry, added another biochemistry lecture, another molecular biology lecture, and a general chemistry lecture. I won't go into the details behind these decisions, but we strongly encourage our students to mirror the ratio of the hours they spend studying the various topics with what we allot to our topics in class.

When the last of the new books are completed and released (around the end of this year), you'll notice that organic chemistry of biological molecules book II is more of a biochemistry book than an organic chemistry book. You'll see two more chapters in general chemistry, and you'll see physics will have many examples removed and replaced with biophysics.

These are all changes that were hashed out and rehashed many times over a sixteen month period of time. We strongly encourage those who take our course and use our books to use the schedule we have built into our materials. Even if you don;t use our materials, you would be well served to follow our schedule.