No Pre-Med Advisors

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by elmo513, Mar 2, 2001.

  1. elmo513

    elmo513 New Member

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    My school doesn't have any kind of pre-med counselors, we have an "advisory board" but all they do is decide if you get a letter of recommendation from the "pre-med advisory board" basically we have no one to tell us when to take mcats, what schools we have a chance at, etc. my advisor is a bio professor, but she was never pre-med so she really doesn't know any more than i do, are there any services anyone knows about that could help us who are pre-med with this?
     
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  3. alshepard

    alshepard Member

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    There is no pre-med committee at my school either. I relied on books about getting into med school and did searches on the web. I read "The Defintive Guide to Medical School Admissions" by Goldstein and Goldstein and also "The Princeton Review Medical School Companion". I used the ARCO MCAT Supercourse to prep for the MCAT (I recommend taking the April test.) Also you should get the Medical School Admissions Requirements and MCAT Handbook both from AAMC. www.interviewfeedback.com is a very valuable resource also. So far I have interviewed at 5 schools (4 waitlist and no word yet from my last one.) Good Luck!

    p.s. How do you underline or italicize in these posts?
     
  4. Dodge This

    Dodge This Senior Member

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    I agree that you should get a copy of the MSAR (or have access to one). A third-party guide could be useful too. There isn't any kind of professional school advising at your college at all but there is an advisory board? That's a little weird. You'll get through it though.

    (alshepard-click on "UBB CODE is ON" to the left of the box you type your message into to see how to change text styles.)
     
  5. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    Alshepard and Elmo:

    I am privy to a national list of advisors.

    If you will post your college here, perhaps I can find a name for you.

    An "advisory board" and no advisor? I too am surprised.

     
  6. gower

    gower 1K Member

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    Department of Further Amplification: Comment on Advisors:

    Advisors are familiar with what is required for admission to all health professions schools. They don't necessarily advise on the careers, but on how to meet admission requirements, etc. The interface is college [​IMG]rofessional school admission. It is not necessary for an advisor to be a physician, dentist, veterinarian, PA, etc. Their speciality is advising undergraduates on matters related to college curriculum, MCAT/DAT/VCAT and other such exams, the mechanics of application, and to help students deal with problems arising in courses, etc. As in any profession, some advisors are more proactive than others, more available than others, more user-friendly than others, more helpful than others. Advisors often have informational resources available that students don't have or don't even know about.

    Some few advisors are fact MDs themselves, many are full-time tenured faculty, commonly in biology and chemistry departments but sometimes outside the sciences, others operate out of college counselling offices. At some universities there are different advisors for different colleges on the same campus (such as General Studies, the liberal arts college, the agriculture school, the engineering school).

    Many medical schools and dental schools want or look for letters originating in the advisor's office, because they are familiar with the writers, know what the letters mean and which they can trust.

    At least, almost all colleges have someone--even if it is in the general academic advising office--preprofessional students can turn to. Seek, and maybe ye shall find.

    There are advisors in the professional schools for the interface between the professional school curriculum and whatever comes after. That is their speciality.

     

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