Non-traditional student

Discussion in 'Pre-Dental' started by silvermodelrph, Sep 19, 2000.

  1. silvermodelrph

    silvermodelrph New Member

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    Hello! I am a 35 year-old pharmacist interested in applying to dental school. I need to know if I should apply directly to dental school or obtain a post-bacc. degree first. My overall GPA is 3.16 and my science GPA is 2.75. If I score well (>19) on all portions of the DAT, write a kick-butt essay, and obtain a diverse plethora of dental experiences, is my chance of admission hopeful? Or should I just get my Master's and apply then? By the way, I am > 8 years out of college. Has anyone made it to dental school with the GPA's I mention here? I'd appreciate any constructive advice! Thank you in advance!
     
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  3. chocobo

    chocobo Senior Member

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    I think the decision would be based on whether you want to get into any dental school or whether you want to get into particular dental schools. (By the way, does going to grad school have an effect on GPA? Sorry, don't really know how that works). If you take a look at the stats for the lowest schools (in terms of GPA), there are a few hovering at the lower end of 3 or lower (for 1999-2000 entering class), such as Howard, Meharry, Tufts. So it's probably possible to get into a dental school. Some schools also say they don't emphasize GPA too much, such as UOP.
    HTH
     
  4. FutureMD

    FutureMD Junior Member

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    Silvermodelrph,
    Why are you leaving pharmacy? I'm 40 planning on entering the pharmacy field in 2002. I've considered medicine but have decided that pharmacy would be the best route for a second career.
    Any experiences or advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks,
     
  5. silvermodelrph

    silvermodelrph New Member

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    Dear FutureMD--To make a long story short, I'm leaving pharmacy because I desire a more hands-on approach to patient care. The pharmacy school I graduated from (Albany College of Pharmacy-Union University) had a great blend of traditional pharmacy (compounding, dosage forms, etc.) with great emphasis on clinical pharmacy. I still use the clinical stuff I learned way back then today!! However, I don't feel that I'm utilizing my skills to the fullest in the setting that I'm in now-- which is retail pharmacy. A career in dentistry would satisfy two of my needs: working with materials and direct patient contact (not being "the middleman").
    Anyway, this is merely my opinion and it should not dissuade you in any way! I think you have made an excellent choice for a second career. Pharmacy is currently going through some changes and you have picked the right time to get on board. You should have no problem getting a job and there are many different paths you can take once you receive your degree. I say go for it! As with any profession, you are what you make of it! Good luck.
     
  6. FutureMD

    FutureMD Junior Member

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    Silvermodelrph,
    Thanks for your reply. I'm glad to hear the goods comments about pharmacy.

     
  7. galadriel

    galadriel Member

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    From what you say about your undergrad grades it is a good bet that will think you picked pharmacy because you couldn't get into dental school with that record. But maybe that will argue for a first choice of dentistry. But you can bet that you will be asked about the career change. How you handle it will be important. A possible fly in the ointment is how long ago you took the basic sciences. Professional school science courses usually carry less weight than undergrad sciences; they are considered less competitive at what is a graduate level. Surely you have a shot at it. How you handle an interview will be most important. Be up front about everything. And maturity is usually a plus.


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