Mcdingleberries

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I am from California and I have 2.79 GPA majoring in economics from UC Berkeley and I graduated in 2004. I worked in civil engineering for 2 years and decided it wasn't right for me. I decided to try medicine and science and did post-bac work at UCLA and got a 3.83 in all the science classes. I think my overall with the science is a 3.18. I have worked in medical clinics (my dad is a doctor), volunteered mentoring underprivileged kids and also worked doing research in the center for health sciences at UCLA. I also have a guilty record for an infraction in 2004 for challenging to fight in public, but it was really a pretty crappy situation where the cops were just looking to make an example of someone and arrest them. I just got a 33 O on my MCAT VR 8, PS, 13, BS 12. I would like to get into a california school or a school like george washington or georgetown. What do you think my chances are and which schools should I apply to? Thanks for you help.
 

DrMidlife

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I am from California and I have 2.79 GPA majoring in economics from UC Berkeley and I graduated in 2004. I worked in civil engineering for 2 years and decided it wasn't right for me. I decided to try medicine and science and did post-bac work at UCLA and got a 3.83 in all the science classes. I think my overall with the science is a 3.18. I have worked in medical clinics (my dad is a doctor), volunteered mentoring underprivileged kids and also worked doing research in the center for health sciences at UCLA. I also have a guilty record for an infraction in 2004 for challenging to fight in public, but it was really a pretty crappy situation where the cops were just looking to make an example of someone and arrest them. I just got a 33 O on my MCAT VR 8, PS, 13, BS 12. I would like to get into a california school or a school like george washington or georgetown. What do you think my chances are and which schools should I apply to? Thanks for you help.

Sigh. Welcome to the club. We have lots of folks here, myself included, who have ancient GPA damage that can't really be fixed. Lots of us get in somewhere. But with a sub-3.5 you are in a bit of trouble, my friend, even if Loma Linda looks good to you.

Your numbers are a wee bit better than mine. Have a look at my mdapps and see how well it went for me. I suggest you find out what an SMP is, over in the postbac forum. Or change your target. But you're young, so I'd vote SMP.

I strongly suggest that you pick up an MSAR. The most recent one has the ranges of GPAs for accepted students. You'll probably want to be sitting down for it.

GW and Georgetown, by the way, are at the top of the list of most applications received by a med school. Last year they got roughly 13,000 and 11,000 apps, respectively. Which means that about a quarter of all applicants apply to those schools. Yikes.

Best of luck to you.
 

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Sigh. Welcome to the club. We have lots of folks here, myself included, who have ancient GPA damage that can't really be fixed. Lots of us get in somewhere. But with a sub-3.5 you are in a bit of trouble, my friend, even if Loma Linda looks good to you.

What makes you bring up Loma Linda like that? I'm not sure I understand your statement.
 
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DrMidlife

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What makes you bring up Loma Linda like that? I'm not sure I understand your statement.

Loma Linda has the lowest GPA/MCAT numbers in CA for accepted students. And those numbers are still quite a bit higher than private schools in other states. My point was that the easiest CA MD school to get into is NOT easy to get into.
 

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Loma Linda has the lowest GPA/MCAT numbers in CA for accepted students. And those numbers are still quite a bit higher than private schools in other states. My point was that the easiest CA MD school to get into is NOT easy to get into.

whats the easiest US MD school (that is not HB) to get into?
 

DrMidlife

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whats the easiest US MD school (that is not HB) to get into?

I don't know what HB is. The MSAR has all this info, and if you're serious about med school, really you should get one. The latest '09 issue has percentiles which is a big improvement over the previous 4 years' issues.
 

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I am from California and I have 2.79 GPA majoring in economics from UC Berkeley and I graduated in 2004. I worked in civil engineering for 2 years and decided it wasn't right for me. I decided to try medicine and science and did post-bac work at UCLA and got a 3.83 in all the science classes. I think my overall with the science is a 3.18. I have worked in medical clinics (my dad is a doctor), volunteered mentoring underprivileged kids and also worked doing research in the center for health sciences at UCLA. I also have a guilty record for an infraction in 2004 for challenging to fight in public, but it was really a pretty crappy situation where the cops were just looking to make an example of someone and arrest them. I just got a 33 O on my MCAT VR 8, PS, 13, BS 12. I would like to get into a california school or a school like george washington or georgetown. What do you think my chances are and which schools should I apply to? Thanks for you help.


Yep, welcome to the club. Your situation is somewhat unique since you graduated from college so recently.

First off, your GPA is admittedly on the low side for MD schools. Even though you graduated several years ago and took a Post-bacc, the de facto cut-off for someone with your MCAT score seems to be in the 3.3-3.4 range, below that those range and you might be make the cut-off at a lot of schools.

Secondly, you have a criminal record. While it won't prevent you from getting licensed, it will bring your character and maturity into question. Adcoms are very particular about the type of individuals that they admit and being arrested for challenging someone to a fight in public certainly reflects badly on your judgement and character. I know some friends and people on SDN who have been admitted to medical school with criminal records, but usually they're nothing more than speeding charges or underage alcohol convictions.

Your chances at a CA public school is rather low since they have some of the most competitive programs of any state (I think the average GPA and MCAT score for a CA public school is something like 3.7 and 33). I know Georgetown and GW are supercompetitive because of their location and relation with their undergraduate school. I would try to apply to out of state schools in the midwest since they generally more friendly towards CA applicants. Also definitely consider DO schools since they tend to be more forgiving with regards to your GPA situation.
 

Mcdingleberries

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Thank you all for the input. Appreciate your insight on my situation. I've applied to around 30 or so schools and a couple of DO schools. I really don't expect to get into any california schools, but all I really want is to get into an MD program somewhere. If I can't get into one of those I hope I can get into a DO program. Yeah I got the MSAR book but I can't imagine that it is the end all be all for everybody's situation, but maybe it is. I wonder how everybody knows so much about what the medical schools will accept and not accept. Are there people on here that are on medical school admissions? I've been talking to the dean of UCI and he thought that I shouldn't be too worried.
 

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Thank you all for the input. Appreciate your insight on my situation. I've applied to around 30 or so schools and a couple of DO schools. I really don't expect to get into any california schools, but all I really want is to get into an MD program somewhere. If I can't get into one of those I hope I can get into a DO program. Yeah I got the MSAR book but I can't imagine that it is the end all be all for everybody's situation, but maybe it is. I wonder how everybody knows so much about what the medical schools will accept and not accept. Are there people on here that are on medical school admissions? I've been talking to the dean of UCI and he thought that I shouldn't be too worried.

Ask that dean to tell you how many California residents apply to UCI, how many are interviewed and accepted, what the median GPA is, and what the 10th percentile GPA is. If he doesn't know, then tell him that in '08, 3749 residents applied, 455 were interviewed, and 101 matriculated. He should start backing off at this point, in my view. Then tell him that the average acceptee has a 3.7, and the bottom 10% of the class started at a 3.4. If he still thinks you shouldn't be worried with a 3.18, there are about 12,000 SDN members who would LOVE to hear why not.

I'm thinking he tells all prospective applicants they shouldn't worry. I certainly hope that six months from now you come back on SDN and tell me how wrong I was. But in your shoes I'd be reading the Gevitz book and shadowing a DO to earn a letter.

Best of luck to you.
 

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I thought you suggested an smp program? Now you are suggesting shadowing a DO and a Gevitz book. Not sure if you're the right person to be talking to. I don't think that the gpa and mcat's are the only thing that the admission board takes into account. My friend got into UCSF this year with a 3.5 overall GPA and a 3.1 science with a 30 MCAT. If she listened to you, she wouldn't have even applied to UCSF. So excuse me for not taking your advice, I guess if I had your attitude about things I wouldn't apply at all. You must be one of those jaded people who either never gets in because of you're a negative nancy or it's taken you multiple years to get in. In either case you would make a suspect doctor. I can imagine you treating someone with cancer or something and telling them they will certainly die because their chances do not fall within the statistics.
 

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I thought you suggested an smp program? Now you are suggesting shadowing a DO and a Gevitz book. Not sure if you're the right person to be talking to. I don't think that the gpa and mcat's are the only thing that the admission board takes into account. My friend got into UCSF this year with a 3.5 overall GPA and a 3.1 science with a 30 MCAT. If she listened to you, she wouldn't have even applied to UCSF. So excuse me for not taking your advice, I guess if I had your attitude about things I wouldn't apply at all. You must be one of those jaded people who either never gets in because of you're a negative nancy or it's taken you multiple years to get in. In either case you would make a suspect doctor. I can imagine you treating someone with cancer or something and telling them they will certainly die because their chances do not fall within the statistics.

You are misinterpreting her tone. While you indeed, should not allow anyone to discourage you, you also don't want to allow a defensive mindset to control your perception.

Often, and this was the point being made in my estimation, Deans of Admission have the job of public interface and as such tend to put rosy spins on their school's process etc. Take that into consideration or not--as you like it.
 
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student1799

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I am from California and I have 2.79 GPA majoring in economics from UC Berkeley and I graduated in 2004. [...] I decided to try medicine and science and did post-bac work at UCLA and got a 3.83 in all the science classes. I think my overall with the science is a 3.18. [...] I also have a guilty record for an infraction in 2004 for challenging to fight in public [...] 33 O on my MCAT VR 8, PS, 13, BS 12. I would like to get into a california school or a school like george washington or georgetown. What do you think my chances are and which schools should I apply to? Thanks for you help.

Mcdingleberries, I think you should take Dr. Midlife's advice pretty seriously. If you look at her mdapps profile, you'll see that her undergrad GPA is pretty similar to yours (mine is too, BTW), although her BCPM is lower. Even though she applied ONLY to DO schools (which are SIGNIFICANTLY more forgiving of academic imperfections than allo schools), it still wasn't a cakewalk to get into a school she liked.

Besides the undergrad GPA, you have another big strike against you: the criminal record. (For your sake, I hope it was a misdemeanor and not a felony--otherwise you're probably toast.) Even though you think it was BS, it's really going to take a lot of explaining to convince med schools that you're not a screwup. Here, again, DO schools may be more willing to listen to you, although even they are likely to have a problem with it also.

And finally, I hate to sound brutal, but the fact that you're relatively young and your dad's a doctor is going to cause some skepticism. Adcoms may well look at you and think, "He didn't like his first job, couldn't think of anything else to do, so he thought "Maybe I should try being a doctor." " Even if that's not true in your case, you have to fight the statistics: children of MDs have higher attrition rates from med school and medical practice than any other group. So med schools often scrutinize their applications VERY closely, to make sure the applicants really want this and know what they're getting into.

So if you want to get into any med school at all, you have some serious work to do. This is what I'd suggest:

1. Get a SERIOUS (i.e. full-time) job related to health care or scientific research. It doesn't have to be a paying job, but you should put in a lot of hours and stick with it for at least a year, to prove that you're serious.

2. Accumulate a lot of high-quality clinical hours (hundreds). Same motivation as #1.

3. Put in some heavy-duty criminal-justice-related community service (like working with released prisoners or something like that) to show you're genuinely sorry for the fighting arrest. (And don't EVER blame it on the police in an interview--that's not going to go over very well.)

4. Take the MCAT again and get a REALLY high score--like 36 or above. Your first score was all right for a trad applicant with no baggage, but even for them, it wouldn't really cut the mustard at super-competitive schools like the ones you mentioned. But for someone in your situation, you really have to blow the MCAT away to convince adcoms that you can handle med school. (It's kind of idiotic, I know, but that's how the game is played.)

It's definitely not impossible to get into allo med school with a low GPA, IF the rest of your application is extremely strong. But I think you'd have a pretty tough time of it if you applied right now, unless you were willing to attend a much less selective med school far from where you live (and maybe not even then).
 

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I thought you suggested an smp program? Now you are suggesting shadowing a DO and a Gevitz book. Not sure if you're the right person to be talking to. I don't think that the gpa and mcat's are the only thing that the admission board takes into account. My friend got into UCSF this year with a 3.5 overall GPA and a 3.1 science with a 30 MCAT. If she listened to you, she wouldn't have even applied to UCSF. So excuse me for not taking your advice, I guess if I had your attitude about things I wouldn't apply at all. You must be one of those jaded people who either never gets in because of you're a negative nancy or it's taken you multiple years to get in. In either case you would make a suspect doctor. I can imagine you treating someone with cancer or something and telling them they will certainly die because their chances do not fall within the statistics.

I don't think there's any need for ad hominem attacks against any of the other posters here. I've read her past posts and I can tell you that Dr Midlife is definitely a very compassionate person and not a negative nancy at all. I think you're underestimating how incredibly competitive the process is. First off, with your GPA and arrest record, your application might automatically get screened out by a computer before it even reaches the desks of the member of the admissions committee. Second off, your friend might have something really extraordinary going for her that you don't know about (maybe she was an URM, or published an award-winning paper, or maybe her parents donated $100 million to the school). Even then, her GPA is good enough that it meets the cut-off. As for what the admissions dean told you, he was probably trying to be nice and not pre-judge you passed on what you told him. I know for a fact that most of the adcoms encourage you to apply to their school because you pay them $100 for the secondary application fee. It's difficult to predict how you'll do this application season, but I would say it's very unlikely that you'll be accepted by your state school. You can apply and try your luck, but I would encourage you to remain realistic.
 

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Other than the 34 MD schools I applied to, yes I only applied to DO schools.

Sorry, Dr. Midlife, my mistake. I thought all the schools on your list were DO schools. I meant no offense.
 

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Sorry, Dr. Midlife, my mistake. I thought all the schools on your list were DO schools. I meant no offense.

Not at all, just trying to make sure my credentials as a former delusional applicant were made clear. I wish somebody a year ago would have told me what I'm telling the OP now.
 

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Not at all, just trying to make sure my credentials as a former delusional applicant were made clear. I wish somebody a year ago would have told me what I'm telling the OP now.

We should have DAA meetings - Delusional Applicants Anonymous.
 

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Sometimes it's better to have delusions of grandeur than to suffer from bouts of self-pity - especially in this process.

Sure - I wouldn't trade anything for how good it felt to get interviewed at UWash, kick holy ass, and spend several months in the competitive pool, even though I was pretty darned sure it wouldn't end well. That was the most legitimizing experience I had last year. If I'd assumed they wouldn't talk to me because of my numbers I would have missed out.

But for me to apply to so many reach schools was embarrassingly naive.
 

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whats the easiest US MD school (that is not HB) to get into?


I had similar stats mcat wise, and gpa was above a 3 but less than 3.4

Morehouse and Meharry will not be easy for you with the gpa and the vr of a 8 b/c they have cut offs. if you are not a urm you have to have above a 3.1, etc. But those are HBCU's, which you specifically did not ask for

Easiest schools: marshall in west virginia, university of west va.
U of Kentucky if you are a state resident
Mercer is ga. has the lowest mcat score average in ga. of md schools (Yes its lower than morehouse)

Even though I am not a urm, I ended up at Morehouse and really like it. Its very diverse, much more so than Meharry, imo
 
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Thank you all for the input. Appreciate your insight on my situation. I've applied to around 30 or so schools and a couple of DO schools. I really don't expect to get into any california schools, but all I really want is to get into an MD program somewhere. If I can't get into one of those I hope I can get into a DO program. Yeah I got the MSAR book but I can't imagine that it is the end all be all for everybody's situation, but maybe it is. I wonder how everybody knows so much about what the medical schools will accept and not accept. Are there people on here that are on medical school admissions? I've been talking to the dean of UCI and he thought that I shouldn't be too worried.
Yes, there are people on SDN who are adcoms. And yes, you should listen to Dr. Midlife, and yes, you should be very worried. You sound like you're a bright and enthusiastic guy or gal, but you are not as informed about the app process as you ought to be. Also, IMHO, your attitude (ex. blaming your arrest on the police looking to make an example, being defensive when people don't automatically tell you what you want to hear) is the biggest strike against you. My school tends to be pretty forgiving of previous bad academic performance if there is a solid more recent record. Applicants won't automatically be rejected over a bad freshman year if they do well as juniors and seniors. However, even applicants who look absolutely stellar on paper (near perfect GPAs and MCAT scores, excellent ECs and LORs) can still be rejected if the adcom feels that they don't play well with others; they are unethical or unprofessional; or they otherwise will not be a good fit for this school. It is also entirely possible with your GPA that you may never get the chance to make your case in person at many schools. Unfortunately, there are just too many highly competitive applicants, and too few interview slots and medical school seats for every qualified person to get one.

You should be aware that many state schools give preference to residents of their own states, and therefore you may not be a viable candidate at state schools in other states even if your stats are in their range. For example, my state schools would probably screen you out presecondary. (I'm from FL.) Most private schools do not have geographic preferences. (U Miami and Baylor are two exceptions that I can think of offhand.) Hopefully, you have applied broadly to a variety of schools that will accept CA residents. Now all you can do is wait and see how things turn out. You may also want to consider continuing to take additional coursework this year while you apply to further increase your GPA. Best of luck to you.
 

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Hello, everyone. Im kinda of new to the post and was not sure where to start so here I go.
To spare the dramatic version of my life I will try to hit it straight on. Im a 40 y/o RN, BSN for 14 years who has always wanted to become a Physician. I had an average college start and withdrew from school, due to a series of family and financial issues. I believe, that I have a combined gpa, (over the years & 3 colleges to my BSn) of maybe 3.4 to 3.6 all undergrad . As a new freshman, 22 years ago? I took biology I/ chem I that resulted in an F for obvious reasons of a freshman away from home. I repeated chemI twice and got a C.(2 diff chems at that time one was college chem/ the other principles of chem, my advisor seemed to think that one was more challenging than the other:eek:.) After all of the drama subsided in My life I took my nursing prereqs and made all As, anatomy, pathophys, micro,,,,etc. Never took any of the other required courses for premed cuz at the time I had not fully recovered from my husbands death. So,, here I am trying to figure out the best way to go about 1) getting my prereqs all in and the best way to do that. 2) How to boost my gpa. Since I have a BSN, and have not taken the mcat or applied to med school, I cant do an SMP so that is out.
Will a MPH, be helpful while taking the required prereqs ? Should I consider a Post Bacc program for my Pre reqs or should I just take them at a 4 yr univ? What do I do????? Ive been reading all these post for about 6 months and finally decided to just put it out there. I am grateful and appreciative for any recommendations to help me get started.
 

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Hello, everyone. Im kinda of new to the post and was not sure where to start so here I go.
To spare the dramatic version of my life I will try to hit it straight on. Im a 40 y/o RN, BSN for 14 years who has always wanted to become a Physician. I had an average college start and withdrew from school, due to a series of family and financial issues. I believe, that I have a combined gpa, (over the years & 3 colleges to my BSn) of maybe 3.4 to 3.6 all undergrad . As a new freshman, 22 years ago? I took biology I/ chem I that resulted in an F for obvious reasons of a freshman away from home. I repeated chemI twice and got a C.(2 diff chems at that time one was college chem/ the other principles of chem, my advisor seemed to think that one was more challenging than the other:eek:.) After all of the drama subsided in My life I took my nursing prereqs and made all As, anatomy, pathophys, micro,,,,etc. Never took any of the other required courses for premed cuz at the time I had not fully recovered from my husbands death. So,, here I am trying to figure out the best way to go about 1) getting my prereqs all in and the best way to do that. 2) How to boost my gpa. Since I have a BSN, and have not taken the mcat or applied to med school, I cant do an SMP so that is out.
Will a MPH, be helpful while taking the required prereqs ? Should I consider a Post Bacc program for my Pre reqs or should I just take them at a 4 yr univ? What do I do????? Ive been reading all these post for about 6 months and finally decided to just put it out there. I am grateful and appreciative for any recommendations to help me get started.

You are going to have an uphill battle if you want to be considered for medical school at this stage. I understand your motivation for being a doctor, however, I want you to be aware that you will have to go back to school, retake all the prerequisite classes (bio, chem, organic chem, physics and all associated lab), study and take the MCAT, and not be able to practice medicine by yourself for at least 10 years (when you turn 50).

You're overall GPA is OK, so you won't have to take years of classes to bump up a low average GPA, that being said, you will probably have to retake all the required classes (including the your dreaded chem courses) and average no less than an 3.5 combined GPA. Since you will be taking the classes sequentially (organic chemistry after chem), it will take about two years to complete your coursework. After that, you will have to take the MCAT, which will test you on all the basic sciences that you just learned (try to score a 30 at minimum). After that, it will take you about a year to file your medical school application, be interviewed and be accepted. So, under the best circumstances, don't plan on matriculating into medical school until you're 43.

Once you are enrolled in medical school, you are in a four year plan and will graduate when you turn 47. If you choose a short residency period (such as pediatrics or family practice instead of surgery), you will be able to practice when you turn 50. If you decide to specialize in something more challenging, such as surgery or ortho, you will be training anywhere from 6-10 years, in which case, you won't be able to practice until you're in your mid-50s.

As you can tell, being a doctor is something that takes a very long time and can't be done on a whim. Furthermore, when you're taking classes and finally end up going to medical school, you will not be able to hold down a job since the workload is too heavy. So if you go this route, you need financial security for the whole time when you're in school. Depending on your family situation (whether you're married, have a working spouse, or have significant savings), you will need someone to be there to support you (both emotionally and financially). You will also likely have to quit your job in order to keep up with the premedical courseload.

Lastly, I should also mention some things about the medical school admissions process. Lots of people apply and end up getting rejected (60% out of the 50,000 who apply every year are rejected by all the medical schools that they's applied to). This is natural and for the most part, not suprising. What may be suprising is how high the rejection rate is for those who are 35 years or older. I think the percentage of acceptance given to those who are 40 years or older is less than 10% in any application year. Although medical schools say that they don't practice age discrimination, they still reject more older applicants because they feel that the applicant will not be able to practice medicine for as long a time as a younger applicant before retirement. However, those who do end up being rejected are young and can find an alternate career, or have time to take a remedial classes to shore up a low GPA. You will not have that option. If you take classes now and fail chem or realize that the courseload is too challenging, you will not have the time to make up for a low GPA. You will also be in significant debt because you had to pay for the classes.
 

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So, under the best circumstances, don't plan on matriculating into medical school until you're 43.

Once you are enrolled in medical school, you are in a four year plan and will graduate when you turn 47. If you choose a short residency period (such as pediatrics or family practice instead of surgery), you will be able to practice when you turn 50. If you decide to specialize in something more challenging, such as surgery or ortho, you will be training anywhere from 6-10 years, in which case, you won't be able to practice until you're in your mid-50s.

I'm suppressing a little laugh here, because I'm applying this year at 45, and if everything goes according to plan (knock wood), I'll get my M.D. when I'm 50 and start practicing a few years later. (No surgery or ortho for me, though--my endurance DOES have a limit.)

ChairmanMao, I'm not making fun of your post, because you laid out a lot of sobering facts that are important for the OP to know. I just wanted to make the point that even though a goal may be really hard to achieve (like this one), there will still be those who are determined to try anyway--and will succeed. I noticed the OP said that she "always wanted" to be a physician; sometimes it's time to go after what you've always wanted, even at the ripe old age of 40. (Hell, from my point of view, the OP is getting an "early" start by doing this at 40. I was 42 when I began making plans, and 43 by the time I started school.)

To the OP: Having said what I just did, you shouldn't kid yourself that this is going to be easy, because it's not. (It will be brutal.) But before jumping in, you have to make sure you've got some important things covered:

1. Money. As ChairmanMao said, this is big. The main constraint for people our age is time--we can't afford to go through the classes by onesies and twosies as younger nontrads can. That means you really have to quit working and do a full-time postbacc program. (I did a formal one, but if you're brave you can do the same thing cheaper by taking the same classes on your own at a local university.) So not only do you have to have the money for tuition, you need to be able to support yourself for 2 years without working. You'll have a "lag" year while you're applying to med school, and you can work close to full-time then, but after that you'll be in med school, and your ability to earn a living will be zero until you're a resident.

So I think the only way that this would be practical for you to consider is if you have some independent means of support (like savings, a pension, insurance money, inheritance, etc.) to get you through postbacc. Otherwise, I'm afraid you just wouldn't be able to get the classes done in enough time to have a realistic chance of getting into med school.

2. Emotional/family support. Even if money is taken care of, you should realize that this is a really lonely road to be taking all by yourself. I'm lucky: I have a wonderful husband and two kids who are behind me 100%, and yet you wouldn't believe how beaten down and demoralized I feel a lot of the time. The premed classes are brutal, and applying to med school seems almost worse than the classes. Yes, you can get through these things, but your odds are going to be MUCH better if you have family or really dependable, close friends to back you up. If you don't, I would think twice about doing this.

I'm going to shut up now, because I've already said too much. But feel free to PM me if you want more info.

Good luck, and don't be afraid of your dreams.
 

myjoiern

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Chairmanmao, Im so grateful that god does rule the world and not man. Realistically Im grateful for your honesty because it makes me that much more blessed and determined, and aware that the devil is alive and kicking. Its amazing that your post actually made me realize how blessed I actually am because this is not a destitude situation for me in comparison to what I have been through in my feeble forty on this earth. I can only speak for me. However, All great points that you have mentioned have been considered and are 100% understood. I do realize the time effort and work that it will take to be on point. I dont plan on doing this for braggin rites at church, its ALWAYS, been a personal desire and interest to practice. So Im appreciative to any of your present or future suggestions/ advice. Thanks a million, be blessed in your quest and remember God is able. :love:
 
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PreMedPrincess

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Chairmanmao, Im so grateful that god does rule the world and not man. Realistically Im grateful for your honesty because it makes me that much more blessed and determined, and aware that the devil is alive and kicking. Its amazing that your post actually made me realize how blessed I actually am because this is not a destitude situation for me in comparison to what I have been through in my feeble forty on this earth. I can only speak for me. However, All great points that you have mentioned have been considered and are 100% understood. I do realize the time effort and work that it will take to be on point. I dont plan on doing this for braggin rites at church, its ALWAYS, been a personal desire and interest to practice. So Im appreciative to any of your present or future suggestions/ advice. Thanks a million, be blessed in your quest and remember God is able. :love:
LOL!!!

this is quite possibly the FUNNIEST post I have ever read on here.

wow.:laugh::laugh::laugh:
 
N

njbmd

So,, here I am trying to figure out the best way to go about 1) getting my prereqs all in and the best way to do that. 2) How to boost my gpa. Since I have a BSN, and have not taken the mcat or applied to med school, I cant do an SMP so that is out.
Will a MPH, be helpful while taking the required prereqs ? Should I consider a Post Bacc program for my Pre reqs or should I just take them at a 4 yr univ? What do I do????? Ive been reading all these post for about 6 months and finally decided to just put it out there. I am grateful and appreciative for any recommendations to help me get started.

Your best route into medical school is any route that will take you through the pre-med courses with an excellent performance (no grades less than B+). After those are completed, you need to take the Medical College Admissions Test and score competitively.

Getting a Masters in Public Health isn't going to make you more attractive to medical schools. Getting your pre-med coursework and MCAT done with an outstanding performance will greatly increase your competiveness. You don't have to do a formal post bacc but you do need coursework that is of sufficient depth and breadth that you can do well on the MCAT. If your uGPA from your BSN is low, then you may need additional coursework(in addition to the premed courses) to bring this up. Also, look at the prereq courses for the medical schools that you intend to apply to and make sure that you cover their pre-reqs too.

There's no age limit for entry into medical school or any residency. At the ripe old age of 50, I started General Surgery residency under the old system (before 80-hour workweek limit) and did well. It's interesting how doing someting that is intellectually stimulating and exciting goes a long way in making up for the length of the residency. Now, I am living my dream and practicing a craft that I love. In short, dont' rule anything out that you want to do. If you have the desire and the willingness to work for what you want, then go for it. I certainly have no regrets and the loans are paid off.
 

Krisss17

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Chairmanmao, Im so grateful that god does rule the world and not man. Realistically Im grateful for your honesty because it makes me that much more blessed and determined, and aware that the devil is alive and kicking. Its amazing that your post actually made me realize how blessed I actually am because this is not a destitude situation for me in comparison to what I have been through in my feeble forty on this earth. I can only speak for me. However, All great points that you have mentioned have been considered and are 100% understood. I do realize the time effort and work that it will take to be on point. I dont plan on doing this for braggin rites at church, its ALWAYS, been a personal desire and interest to practice. So Im appreciative to any of your present or future suggestions/ advice. Thanks a million, be blessed in your quest and remember God is able. :love:

Hi myjoiern,

Great post. Totally agree with you. If this is what you want to do, go for it. Yes, it is not going to be easy...but what is and if it is, is it really worth it?

No matter which way you look at it, 10 years from now you are going to be 50 either way...you can either continue as you are or work towards this goal.

An ironic thing is that as a non-trad, for many of us, we realize that the journey is as important as the destination. It seems as though many traditional students (and young non-trads) are just looking at their destination. I, personally, am looking at each and every part of the journey.

It is true that you are going to have some schools that are more geared towards traditional students (esp. allopathic schools), but there are also osteopathic schools and some allopathic schools that are positive towards nontrads.

As for advice, I would definitely follow njbmd's. She shoots straight about the realistic requirements of pursuing this goal, but also shows that age is but a number and if you do put your best application forward, itis possible.

Your best route into medical school is any route that will take you through the pre-med courses with an excellent performance (no grades less than B+). After those are completed, you need to take the Medical College Admissions Test and score competitively.

Getting a Masters in Public Health isn't going to make you more attractive to medical schools. Getting your pre-med coursework and MCAT done with an outstanding performance will greatly increase your competiveness. You don't have to do a formal post bacc but you do need coursework that is of sufficient depth and breadth that you can do well on the MCAT. If your uGPA from your BSN is low, then you may need additional coursework(in addition to the premed courses) to bring this up. Also, look at the prereq courses for the medical schools that you intend to apply to and make sure that you cover their pre-reqs too.

There's no age limit for entry into medical school or any residency. At the ripe old age of 50, I started General Surgery residency under the old system (before 80-hour workweek limit) and did well. It's interesting how doing someting that is intellectually stimulating and exciting goes a long way in making up for the length of the residency. Now, I am living my dream and practicing a craft that I love. In short, dont' rule anything out that you want to do. If you have the desire and the willingness to work for what you want, then go for it. I certainly have no regrets and the loans are paid off.
 

myjoiern

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Your best route into medical school is any route that will take you through the pre-med courses with an excellent performance (no grades less than B+). After those are completed, you need to take the Medical College Admissions Test and score competitively.

Getting a Masters in Public Health isn't going to make you more attractive to medical schools. Getting your pre-med coursework and MCAT done with an outstanding performance will greatly increase your competiveness. You don't have to do a formal post bacc but you do need coursework that is of sufficient depth and breadth that you can do well on the MCAT. If your uGPA from your BSN is low, then you may need additional coursework(in addition to the premed courses) to bring this up. Also, look at the prereq courses for the medical schools that you intend to apply to and make sure that you cover their pre-reqs too.

There's no age limit for entry into medical school or any residency. At the ripe old age of 50, I started General Surgery residency under the old system (before 80-hour workweek limit) and did well. It's interesting how doing someting that is intellectually stimulating and exciting goes a long way in making up for the length of the residency. Now, I am living my dream and practicing a craft that I love. In short, dont' rule anything out that you want to do. If you have the desire and the willingness to work for what you want, then go for it. I certainly have no regrets and the loans are paid off.


You are such an inspiration for me. I actually think it was a good thing not to take my pre reqs after my husband passed because it probably would have not been my personal best. I appreciate any and all advice or recomendations you have to share. As it seems you definately are speaking from experience and have walked the walk. You rock and I will be lifting you up. Thanks again, that really helped me tremendously.
 

sm007thie

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at what point does a high MCAT make a person with a low GPA competative?

i'm in the same boat with a low GPA except i have a pretty strong MCAT. i a CA res and kind of have my heart set on going to a public school here. my GPA is no where near the average acceptance, but my MCAT is above the average for all UC schools.

reading these posts makes me think that i haven't applied broadly enough. i'd hate to end up being one of the folks that just didn't apply to the right schools.
 

ChairmanMao

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at what point does a high MCAT make a person with a low GPA competative?
It really depends on the combination of MCAT and GPA scores. There was an admissions committee member on this board, LizzyM, who proposed a quick way to determine your competitiveness by multiplying your GPA by 10 and then adding it to your overall MCAT score (GPA x 10 + MCAT = standardized score). If your MCAT is 35 and your GPA is 3.3, your LizzyM score is 68.

You can calculate the standardized score of the schools that your interested in using the same formula. I think UCLA would have a LizzyM score of 72 based on the average of their accepted students (GPA of 3.7 and MCAT of 35). There is definitely some leeway in how the schools interpret your scores, but from what I've heard, it's really tough to get into a school if you're more than 3 points below a school's LizzyM score.

I looked at your MDApps and yeah, it does seem as though you picked a lot of supercompetitive schools that might screen you out based on your GPA. I think the UC schools might be a bit of a longshot (they accept like 20% of those they interview). The other schools, such as Albany and SUNY are state schools. I would definitely encourage you to add several private low-tier schools (such as GW or Rush) in order to have a reasonable shot at getting in this year.
 

student1799

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The other schools, such as Albany and SUNY are state schools. I would definitely encourage you to add several private low-tier schools (such as GW or Rush) in order to have a reasonable shot at getting in this year.

Just an FYI: Albany is a private school. (There is a SUNY in Albany, but they don't have a med school.)

I would tend to agree with your advice overall, but have you seen the stats on GW? They're downright scary. The stats of their entering class look very mid-tier, but the school is INCREDIBLY hard to get into, because they get 13,000 apps a year, far more than any other med school in the US. (Twice as many as Harvard, Johns Hopkins, etc.) In fact, given that there are 42,000 applicants to med school each year, it looks like over 30% of them apply to THIS ONE SCHOOL. I guess there's not as much self-selection in the applicant pool because the average GPA and MCAT aren't sky-high.
 

ChairmanMao

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Just an FYI: Albany is a private school. (There is a SUNY in Albany, but they don't have a med school.)

I would tend to agree with your advice overall, but have you seen the stats on GW? They're downright scary. The stats of their entering class look very mid-tier, but the school is INCREDIBLY hard to get into, because they get 13,000 apps a year, far more than any other med school in the US. (Twice as many as Harvard, Johns Hopkins, etc.) In fact, given that there are 42,000 applicants to med school each year, it looks like over 30% of them apply to THIS ONE SCHOOL. I guess there's not as much self-selection in the applicant pool because the average GPA and MCAT aren't sky-high.

The figures for GW are a little inflated. I heard from an admissions representative that they use the total number of primary applications that are filed. If you only count complete applications where the secondary is filled, the number drops down to about 5,000 (this number is a bit more realistic, Georgetown University also report that they receive 10,000 primary application but only about half of them end up being completed).

Besides that, I think that GW is a good match for the applicant because they seem to favor older, non-traditional applicants. When I visited the school, they had quite a large number of CA residents in their student body, so I think that the applicant has a pretty good chance there despite the seemingly low acceptance rate. I would also advise that the applicant apply to schools outside of CA and NY state to improve his chances (NYMC and Albany also get an astronomical number of applicant). I would recommend schools in the northeast and the heartland. Pennsylvania alone has large concentration of private schools (e.x. Jefferson medical college, Drexel University, and Temple University) that are somewhat close to the applicant's standardized score and have a large CA student body. Other states that I would recommend are Illinois (Rosalind Frankling University, Rush, Loyola), Ohio, and Michigan. These states all have a large concentration of private schools that accept a large number of CA residents.
 
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