nonbio majors get the screw on the MCAT?

This forum made possible through the generous support of SDN members, donors, and sponsors. Thank you.

Cerberus

Heroic Necromancer
20+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Messages
15,128
Reaction score
186

Members don't see this ad.
From my MCAT studying I noticed the following:

You need no knowledge of gen chem, organic chem, or physics beyond that covered in the required classes.

Doing well in bio requires that you understand genetics, biochem, and a&p beyond the level it is taught in the classes (this is especially true for Genetics).

Doesnt this give bio majors an unfair advantage of the MCAT? I mean, if I am a chem major it probably isnt going to help my PS score out much at all since everything on the PS section seems to be very basic. However, If i am a bio major I have probably taken biochem, genetics, and something relating to physiology - which would likely make the BS section a breeze (i know that having taken Genetics has really saved my butt, since I dont think i learned half of the genetics material covered on the MCAT till I took the class).

What do you think? I am scoring pretty well on BS but I still find it rather annoying.

An interesting aside though, is that the highest test scorers tend to be philosophy majors and math majors even though they have little science background beyond the required courses.
 

DMBFan

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Mar 18, 2004
Messages
215
Reaction score
0
I have an out there theory why math and philosophy majors do so well on the MCAT. I know that the philosophy major is extrememly difficult at my school. And that math is pretty uniformly hard anywhere, so I think that people who decide to major in these relatively intimidating subjects are just plain smart and that's why they do well...
 

Anka

Senior Member
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2003
Messages
789
Reaction score
14
As a lit major, I found the bio portion of the test pretty easy -- most of the stuff you need to know beyond the level of what's covered in Kaplan's big book is in the passage, and as a humanities major I have more practice reading quickly, synthesizing the information, and answering questions about it. And, of course, you kick butt on the verbal.

Just learn Kaplan's big book really well. You don't need much beyond that.

Anka
 

Cerberus

Heroic Necromancer
20+ Year Member
Joined
Dec 13, 2001
Messages
15,128
Reaction score
186
Originally posted by DMBFan
I have an out there theory why math and philosophy majors do so well on the MCAT. I know that the philosophy major is extrememly difficult at my school. And that math is pretty uniformly hard anywhere, so I think that people who decide to major in these relatively intimidating subjects are just plain smart and that's why they do well...

I am a math/philo double major (though i will probably just be taking a minor in math since I am tired of school:laugh: ) and can agree that the math major is pretty difficult (I think ******* hard as hell is a good description). However, I have met a ton of dip**** philo majors. My guess is that philo majors do well because they have to read so many unintelligable philosophy texts.
 

Spidey

Leorl's official stalker
7+ Year Member
15+ Year Member
Joined
Jan 5, 2002
Messages
1,271
Reaction score
0
Originally posted by Cerberus
An interesting aside though, is that the highest test scorers tend to be philosophy majors and math majors

Philosophy teaches a lot of critical thinking and logic. Phil majors spend a lot of time analyzing different arguments, and also plucking meaning out of obscure texts. Aristotle's writing, even after being translated to english, can be very hard to make sense of at first, not to mention Kant. I think this makes them very skilled at looking at the passages on the MCAT and dissecting them, picking out the important parts and finding the answers to the questions easier if they are already embedded in the passages. Well, that's my theory after coming out of a couple philosophy classes.
 
Top