Notre Dame Coach Weis claims malpractice in surgery

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Genetics

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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/football/ncaa/02/13/weis.malpractice.ap/index.html

This points out how dangerous bariatric surgery is. There are serious complications in a shockingly high percentage of cases, yet more and more are performed each year.

There is a lot of debate that procedures like this are straying from the "last resort" they once were, and are performed without due consideration of the possible complications of the surgery, the special dietary needs after surgery, and addressing the underlying psychological and physical causes of obesity.
 

rockinthemullet

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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/football/ncaa/02/13/weis.malpractice.ap/index.html

This points out how dangerous bariatric surgery is. There are serious complications in a shockingly high percentage of cases, yet more and more are performed each year.

There is a lot of debate that procedures like this are straying from the "last resort" they once were, and are performed without due consideration of the possible complications of the surgery, the special dietary needs after surgery, and addressing the underlying psychological and physical causes of obesity.


I hadn't heard about that, thanks for posting.
 

MonkeyNuts!

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I knew a woman who had gastric bypass, afterwards I didnt' even recognize her...
 

DropkickMurphy

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Many of the complications are from poor post-operative decisions and failure to follow the advice of their doctors and nutritionists. The choice is theirs, as is the fault for allowing themselves to become grotesquely obese. At least they are willing to do something about it.

OK, now for the $250,000 question: how does genetic testing play into this? :laugh:
 

epigastric

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http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/football/ncaa/02/13/weis.malpractice.ap/index.html

This points out how dangerous bariatric surgery is. There are serious complications in a shockingly high percentage of cases, yet more and more are performed each year.

There is a lot of debate that procedures like this are straying from the "last resort" they once were, and are performed without due consideration of the possible complications of the surgery, the special dietary needs after surgery, and addressing the underlying psychological and physical causes of obesity.

The mortality rate for laparoscopic bariatric surgery is exceedingly low. The complication rate varies with the procedure, but is low if your surgeon is a high-volume practictioner, much like any other complex surgery.

What is making complication rates go up is the number of inexperienced surgeons who added this option to their practice as a way of offering an elective surgery that could pay them roughly $10k a pop (their cut alone). Fortunately that's leveling off -- supply has now equaled demand.

And yeah, just saw DKM's comment. If you don't follow the directions, restrain your urge to sue post-op. Although an immediate post-op bleed has about 0% probability of being the patient's fault, unless they thought they'd open up their wound and poke around in the drug haze.
 

remo

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My surgeon friend said that this complication was one that occurs a lot and that he doubts Weis will win. According to the news report I read, the problem is that the surgeon did the case and then went out of town for the weekend. His partner covered for him and had to take Weis back to the OR and fix it. You would think the main surgeon would be smart enough not to leave town when he just operated on a high profile person like Weis (he was a coach for the Patriots at the time).
 

beenthere2

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My surgeon friend said that this complication was one that occurs a lot and that he doubts Weis will win. According to the news report I read, the problem is that the surgeon did the case and then went out of town for the weekend. His partner covered for him and had to take Weis back to the OR and fix it. You would think the main surgeon would be smart enough not to leave town when he just operated on a high profile person like Weis (he was a coach for the Patriots at the time).

Gee....are you suggesting that a high profile patient should be treated better than an "ordinary" patient?
 

SnowTown

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My surgeon friend said that this complication was one that occurs a lot and that he doubts Weis will win. According to the news report I read, the problem is that the surgeon did the case and then went out of town for the weekend. His partner covered for him and had to take Weis back to the OR and fix it. You would think the main surgeon would be smart enough not to leave town when he just operated on a high profile person like Weis (he was a coach for the Patriots at the time).

So Weis had bariatric surgery back when he was a coach with the Patriots and he is still morbidly obese now (or became obese again)?
 

McDoctor

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What is making complication rates go up is the number of inexperienced surgeons who added this option to their practice as a way of offering an elective surgery that could pay them roughly $10k a pop (their cut alone). Fortunately that's leveling off -- supply has now equaled demand.

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I could not agree more with this statement. As a student, I rotated through several small community hospitals where general surgeons performed these procedures in addition to the gamut of other procedures they performed. For the most part, the patient selection process was a joke. Many continued to smoke. Most hadn't modified their diet in any meaningful way prior to the procedure. The problems weren't just with the low numbers performed by the surgeons, but with the patient selection process that attempted to do nothing more than meet the minimum requirements set forth by the insurance companies before they would pay for the procedure.
 
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