Raavenclaw

2+ Year Member
May 14, 2017
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The question asks us to apply the results of study 1, which found that extrinsically motivated individuals experienced increased motivation with a monetary reward, while intrinsically motivated individuals experienced decreased feelings of motivation with a monetary reward. The question then asks what would happen to the motivation of an intrinsically motivated employee getting a raise.

I didn't think this could be determined from the study. An increase in salary means giving MORE money to an intrinsically motivated individual who already receives a paycheck. The study addresses giving money as a reward vs not giving money at all. It is not mentioned what effect increasing the monetary compensation will have. How do we know that this will further decrease motivation? Thoughts on this?
 

Doogie.Howser

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Jun 6, 2017
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In the study, giving a reward to the intrinsically motivated is shown to decrease their motivation compared to not giving them a reward. That is specifically shown in Figure 1. So, if you increase the salary (reward) of a highly intrinsically motivated individual, their overall motivation will decrease to be consistent with the data in Figure 1.
 
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Raavenclaw

Raavenclaw

2+ Year Member
May 14, 2017
90
76
Status
Pre-Medical
In the study, giving a reward to the intrinsically motivated is shown to decrease their motivation compared to not giving them a reward. That is specifically shown in Figure 1. So, if you increase the salary (reward) of a highly intrinsically motivated individual, their overall motivation will decrease to be consistent with the data in Figure 1.
Maybe I am overthinking it. My point was that the individual was already receiving a salary, and thus already experienced the decreased motivation. How are we to infer from the results that further increasing the compensation will further decrease motivation? I didn't think the study established that the higher the compensation, the lower the motivation. Am I overthinking it?
 

Nugester

2+ Year Member
Jul 4, 2017
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Pre-Medical
Maybe I am overthinking it. My point was that the individual was already receiving a salary, and thus already experienced the decreased motivation. How are we to infer from the results that further increasing the compensation will further decrease motivation? I didn't think the study established that the higher the compensation, the lower the motivation. Am I overthinking it?
Definitely overthinking it. Said person is receiving a salary (could be low or high, not specified, but irrelevant.). Based on the data, it would decrease their motivation.
 
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