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nterview ethics questions

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by grasshopper, Jul 14, 2001.

  1. grasshopper

    grasshopper Senior Member
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    Just wondering . . . I've heard that I may have a hard time when it comes to interviews (I'm applying right now) because my views on medical ethics type of stuff tend to be more with the conservative Christians than with the mainstream medical profession. Anybody ever heard about this/had experience with this?
     
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  3. BeckyG

    BeckyG Senior Member
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    Hi Grasshopper,

    I think as long as you can back up your statements with sound reasoning and good judgement in interviews, you should be fine. Of course, try to steer away from introducing extremely controversial subjects (i.e., don't bring up abortion, etc), but answer honestly. One thing I learned interviewing is that you never know what the other person believes and that, in the end, the "ethics" questions are not about what you believe, but how you argue your points, stand your ground when questioned and whether you have thoughtfully mulled over the issues. Good luck!
     
  4. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
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    Another thing that interviewers are looking for is your ability to relate with patients who will have a different belief system than yours. It's fine to be a conservative Christian physician -- plenty of physicians are. However, an interviewer wants to make sure that even though you have strong beliefs, that you will be supportive of patients who might think differently or be different from you.
     
  5. Street Philosopher

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    just realize that no matter what you personal ethics are, you MUST conform to the ethical codes established by the law in your state. (e.g. even if you think doctor assisted suicide is humane, if it's illegal, you have to show willingness to comply with the law). i think that's another important thing to get across to the interviewer.
     
  6. grasshopper

    grasshopper Senior Member
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    Thanks guys, for your help. I realized somewhere along the way that I was supposed to be in the pre-med forum, but I'm going to keep with this here since you guys have helped. So, speaking of legal issues, does anybody know if I would ever be required, personally, to do something I didn't want to? Or I suppose if abortion/euthanasia, etc. in whatever form are legal, one can always refer people to a colleauge?
     
  7. Jamier2

    Jamier2 SDN Hillbilly Moderator
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    From what I understand, you have the option of referring procedures to colleagues, if you prefer not to perform them. :)
     
  8. AJM

    AJM SDN Moderator
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    You will not be required to do something that you feel is wrong according to your ethics. In those cases you can refer to another colleague who will do them. In cases such as elective abortions, that is perfectly acceptable. However, in other situations, especially as a resident, you might be given a hard time by your attending if you do refuse to do something based on your ethics, but you still can refuse (as long as it's a legitimate concern! :) ).

    I think that learning how to perform an abortion during medical school or residency is often of concern to many preclinical students. The vast majority, if not all, of the US medical schools do not require their students to learn how to do or observe abortions, but they may offer to teach it on an elective basis. When I did my ObGyn rotation, I was given the option of going to D&C clinic, which was held weekly for women who wanted elective abortions. I chose not to go, based on my ethical beliefs, and no one gave me a difficult time about it -- I just went to a different clinic on those days. I also don't think that my educational experience was compromised in any way, especially since I did observe some emergent D&Cs for patients who had incomplete spontaneous abortions for whom the fetus was already dead, and the D&C was needed to be done to prevent later complications. So at least I know what the procedure involves and what the potential complications are after a D&C so that I will be able to recognize those complications if I come across them.

    Anyway, I don't want to stir up an abortion debate, but I just wanted to point out that while you are expected to provide patients with good care, you are not expected to sacrifice your own ethical beliefs in the process. :)
     
  9. grasshopper

    grasshopper Senior Member
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    Just out of curiousity, anybody have any sort of a perception of what the approximate distribution of medical professionals is with regard to religious convictions in general?
     
  10. jcd311

    jcd311 Member
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    A lot of my views also are pretty conservative. When I was interviewing I worried some about ethical questions, but in reality, I didn't need to. I wasn't asked any ethical questions. Most of the questions that I was asked were based on something that was in my file. So relax... I'd think about some of the possible issues that may come up, and if for some reason you feel as though you have an unfair interview because of differences in your and your interviewers views, tell someone in admissions that same day. They'll more than likely set you up with another interview.
     

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