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Nursing career

OpticDean

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    Hello everyone,

    Could anyone please tell me what the process is for becoming a nurse, the different licensures and certifications needed to advance and how many years of experience, etc needed to advance as a nurse. Basically, starting from zero and reaching RN, how does it work? Thanks.

    Dean
     

    manna

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    1. Non-Student
      Good luck - There are several different paths to becoming an RN... Check out http://www.allnurses.com for nursing forums or http://www.allnursingschools.com for FAQs or listings of schools in your state.

      There are three ways to become an RN -
      1) a hospital diploma degree - not many of these around anymore that I'm familiar with
      2) an ADN - 2 year associates degree, most often offered through a community college, though with pre-reqs many times students end up taking 3 years to complete it
      3)BSN - 4 year bachelors degree, offered at a senior college

      Each school has their own set of pre-reqs and admissions standards, but most include courses in math, english, humanities and science (anatomy, microbiology, chemistry).

      Hope this helps... I have more info I'd like to add, but I have to step away from my PC for the moment..
       
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      Califlower

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      1. Pre-Medical
        To add on to manna's explanation:

        As stated in manna's quick and rather thorough explanation, many schools require prereq's before officially starting a nursing program. Often times they include anatomy, physiology, microbiology, and some chemistry, as well as other courses required for graduation, such as English, humanities, etc..

        Licensing as a nurse varies from state to state. (I live in CA) However, after graduating from a accredited nursing school (either through a hospital, a community college, or a 4-yr university), you are qualified to sit in for the NCLEX-RN. When you pass that, you become a certified RN. (I'm assuming you are interest in being an RN -- LPN/LVN require less time spent in schools than a RN, but they also have to take the boards to get certified.) If you are a graduate of a community college and pass the boards, you are an ADN, and if you graduated with a bachelors, you are a BSN. Usually, most people say that since both RN have passed the same boards and carry the same title, RN, they are paid the same, and treated in same manner. However, these days, more and more employers favor the BSN, and BSN's tend to make a bit more money.

        Since higher education is favorable to any nurse, many are returning to school, part-time or full time. There are many programs out there that allows a RN to obtain higher degrees, such as a MSN (master in nursing). RN-BSN, RN-BSN-MSN, BSN-MSN, are just some. I have heard several RN-BSN (also called RN completion program) programs that can be completed in less than a year. Some RN-MSN programs allow RN without a bachelor's degree to obtain a masters (and a B.S.) in two to three years. MSN programs generally fall into two categories -- nurse clinical specialist (I'm not quite sure of the wording on that title) or nurse practitioner. I am not even near there, so I am not quite sure on the difference. Nurse practitioner further breaks down into Peds, Geriatic, etc.. I was told that a NP often makes 60-80 thou a year. You can even get a doctorate in nursing. I'm still working toward my RN degree, so I don't think I am qualified to enlighten you further. ;) But I hope that helps at least a little. <a href="http://www.discovernursing.com">
        www.discovernursing.com</a> is a website made by Johnson and Johnson and it's very helpful.
         

        manna

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          Originally posted by agent
          You can probably add me to the nursing hunt.
          Since I already have an associates I only have to take a few courses and then start clinicals.

          Good luck Agent! I'm about *this far* away from having my AS degree.. just finishing up a few more pre-reqs for the BSN program that, so far, it looks like I'll be applying to. Nursing just seems like such a good option to begin with... especially considering I have a family to think about. Kids are only little for just SO long, ya know?

          How'd the info session you went to yesterday go?
           

          agent

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            The info session went great but I had no idea that nursing was so competitive.

            Each year the Northern IL nursing program only accepts 60 ppl each fall. There are between 400-250 ppl that apply each term. You have to take a nursing entrance exam and score higher than the 75th percentile to be accepted.

            But overall I think I will dominate. I was fairly positive

            edit>> BTW I registered at Allnurses as agent.

            I made a new club :) http://allnurses.com/t41581/s.html
             
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