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NYCOM Interview

Discussion in 'Medical Students - DO' started by dcpayne, Mar 5, 2001.

  1. dcpayne

    dcpayne Member 10+ Year Member

    38
    0
    Mar 4, 2001
    Columbia, Missouri
    I'm interviewing at NYCOM on Friday. Any advice you can give me on how they run things on interview day? Also, what are my chances of getting in this late in the process, especially as an out of state applicant with a 3.4 GPA and a 32 MCAT? Any advice would be very helpful as I am very excited about the prospect that I might be able to go to medical school there.

     
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  3. DepressedNYCOMstudent

    DepressedNYCOMstudent Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    149
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    Nov 29, 2000
    The interview will be nice. You will be asked all kinds of stuff about yourself. They always want to make sure that you know what OMM is and how it works and your views on it....so be ready to talk about that. Ask lots of questions about the school...anything that you would like to know about it. The interview is not only a way for the school to get to know you but also for you to check out if you like the place or not. Your stats are good ...I think they will get you in. Basically, on the interview day you will asked to assemble inthe admissions office. Then they will call you out one by one to interview you. You willalso be provided with lucnh...order a good lunch..I liked my interview lunch! Then you will be taken on a tour of the campus....Its going to be nice. Ask any questions that you may have. I think you still have a chance at this stage of the cycle. NYCOM is a great school. NYCOM students get into excellent residencies and I am proud to say that I am a NYCOM student. The studies are great. However, this school is a place only for people who want to study. Most of the people here come here only to study. The cafeteria will hopefully become a lot better by the time you enroll here...so I won't complain about that any more because they have told us that they are getting some hot food for us ( and I am really counting on that!!). The big negative thing about NYCOM that I really don't like is that there are no dorms and if you want to live nearby , the apartments are pretty expensive. Thats why I live in Queens and commute all the way to the school everyday. Oh yeah, and there is no social life at NYCOM ( something that really upset me when I came here)....There aren't many activities and student gatherings ( except for classes)taking place. So, it will really be helpful if you have a significant other to provide you with emotional support while you are at this school...because all the students here study all the time. If you are married and already settled in life, then this is a good place for you...you can come here and focus well and go home to pour out your stress on your spouse everyday. Basically, when you come here you must have studies as your first priority and thats it! Don't allow yourself to be affected by lack of social life ( which affected me), lack of a real cafeteria ( which is going to improve), expensive housing, etc. Despite these minor negative points about NYCOM, I still love the school because their quality of education is EXCELLENT and when I graduate from here I will always try to be a good example of the excellent quality of education it gave me. So, welcome to NYCOM. Oh yeah, the best thing I like at NYCOM is their new gym...its right next to the study room and that really helps...study for an hour and then take a break and then study....it feels great!! So, hope to see you at NYCOM soon! :)

     
  4. dcpayne

    dcpayne Member 10+ Year Member

    38
    0
    Mar 4, 2001
    Columbia, Missouri
    Thanks for the input. It sounds like the place is pretty intense, but that seems typical for DO schools. I've met some doctors who are Kirksville grads who have similar memories of their days in medical school.

    BTW, What's the commute like from Queens? I am enaged to a soon to be physician and she is planning on going to public health school/residency in New York and we have been trying to get a feel for what areas are a reasonable commute from both NYCOM and Manhattan.

    Thanks
     
  5. DepressedNYCOMstudent

    DepressedNYCOMstudent Senior Member 10+ Year Member

    149
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    Nov 29, 2000
    Hi! I commute from Queens ...It takes me an hour to get to school by Grand Central. At nights when there isn't much traffic I get home in half an hour..but yeah you have got to drive a long way. On the other hand, it takes only like 5-10 minutes for students who live around NYCOm to get to NYCOM. Otherwise you will have to spend two -3 hours per day travelling to the school. So, I don't know. I wish I could live nearby but the apartments are so expensive. I think instead of building that new NYCOM III building they should have built a dorm instead!!! So, come check out the school. Good Luck.
     
  6. Dr. P

    Dr. P Member 10+ Year Member

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    Nov 17, 2000
    New York, NY, USA
    I agree with Depressed NYCOM Student, the school offers an excellent education, but the housing situation is not the best. I am graduating in 21/2 months and can tell you that I lived in Queens throughout my 4 years. It is a very strategic location because my commute was about 30 min each way during the first 2 years and it is perfectly centrally located allowing access to the NYCOM hospitals during the second 2 years. Your stats sound great. Enjoy the interview and good luck. Know about osteopathy, the similarities and differences between the 2 schools of medicine and be sincere and honest. I have heard horror stories about interviewees MD-bashing, not realizing they were being interview by an MD. Pretty funny.
    Good luck!

     
  7. Dr. P

    Dr. P Member 10+ Year Member

    31
    0
    Nov 17, 2000
    New York, NY, USA
    PS: Hang in there depressed! The light at the end of the tunnel is closer than you think. And no, it's not an on-coming train (despite what Dr. Mancini says!)

    Good luck, see you out there.
     

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