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NYP/Cornell Med Residency on probation 09?

deuce

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    whats the story ? why were they cited ? how have they responded ? I heard they tossed the chair and the residency director as a result of being placed on probation ?
     

    JoyfulMD

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    Apr 19, 2009
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      whats the story ? why were they cited ? how have they responded ? I heard they tossed the chair and the residency director as a result of being placed on probation ?
      The probationary period was temporary, and was over last year. The RRC cited Cornell largely due to work hour violations on one or two services, and mostly only for fracturing the minimum hours that one needs to be away from the hospital.

      The Chair of Medicine at Cornell has been here for a few years, and a Residency Director was recruited from another medical center this year. Nobody was "tossed".

      The match last year was very, very strong. It's a top program and, like Johns Hopkins (also on probation in 2003, Osler Medicine Residency), it will continue to attract competitive people. Don't apply to Cornell if you don't want to work hard. If you're going to make an omlette, you need to break a few eggs.....
       

      deuce

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        what were the specific responses to remediate the fractured hours ? did they hire more residents ? PAs? make the JARS and SARS pick up more hours on those two rotations ?

        PS- I am hearing that the nature of nursing in NYC anywhere pretty much means you will end up doing EKGs, drawing bloods, replacing peripheral caths and even sometimes transporting patients at night - is this true even at NY Hospital ? I this what you were referring to as "working hard " ?
         
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        theneh

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        Apr 13, 2008
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          rotating at weill as a med student, they have plenty of ancillary staff. What you will face is attitude from the nurses from time to time (this is sadly a NYC thing), AND pressure from seniors to get things done so every once in a while you might have to do those tasks yourself i.e. blood draws, IV's etc.
           

          JoyfulMD

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          Apr 19, 2009
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            rotating at weill as a med student, they have plenty of ancillary staff. What you will face is attitude from the nurses from time to time (this is sadly a NYC thing), AND pressure from seniors to get things done so every once in a while you might have to do those tasks yourself i.e. blood draws, IV's etc.
            Agree with this. Hard work at Cornell is secondary to patient volume and acuity. We have some of the best ancillary staff in NYC. Yes, I have had to draw blood a lot, and do EKGs. Don't interview here if you want a cush internship. The people are amazing, but expect to work hard.
             

            JoyfulMD

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            Apr 19, 2009
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              what were the specific responses to remediate the fractured hours ? did they hire more residents ? PAs? make the JARS and SARS pick up more hours on those two rotations ?

              PS- I am hearing that the nature of nursing in NYC anywhere pretty much means you will end up doing EKGs, drawing bloods, replacing peripheral caths and even sometimes transporting patients at night - is this true even at NY Hospital ? I this what you were referring to as "working hard " ?
              They completely restructured the general medicine rotation, so there is more 'overlap' between juniors and seniors. It was war on that service when I started. Also, they hired another set of PAs to make a separate PA service for the more routine cases, and reduced the intern caps. The program has gotten better every year.

              As for IVs, blood draws, and EKGs etc.: you absolutely have no excuse for not knowing how to do these things if you need to, and you will need to here now and again. You will leave with good, practical training. Much of the busy work here is not scut; again, it's the acuity, volume, and turnover that you can expect to see in any large U.S. city.

              I have no regrets. The people at Cornell are special, and we help each other out when it gets crazy. The administration has been very fair, and they are very, very big on nurturing interns. That's the way it should be.
               
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