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Obtaining Army Residency after GMO

Discussion in 'Military Medicine' started by Armydoctobe, Jan 7, 2009.

  1. Armydoctobe

    2+ Year Member

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    What is the approximate percentage of GMOs that are picked up by the military every year for residency. Is OB/GYN that competitive in the military?
     
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  3. BigNavyPedsGuy

    BigNavyPedsGuy Junior Member
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    It's impossible to know. 1) the Army doesn't publish those numbers 2) If they did publish the match, we still wouldn't know how many GMOs had applied
     
  4. orbitsurgMD

    orbitsurgMD Senior Member
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    Your best approximation is going to be:

    [(ArmyPGY2 slots-# straight through in-service contracts)/(AHPSP grads+AUSUHS grads -deferments>1yr)] x 100

    It won't be perfect, because some GMOs apply once for in-service GME, are wait-listed or rejected and then either decide to leave at the end of payback if not accepted and don't re-apply, or they apply later both to in-service GME a second time and to civilian training and decline a military offer in favor of civilian training.

    Nobody keeps these records AFAIK, and GMOs are applying simultaneously from different intern year classes for the same starting PGY2 classes (which is how you get ridiculous things like 45 GMOs in the fleet applying for 3 ophtho slots, and the like.)
     
    #3 orbitsurgMD, Jan 11, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2009
  5. mslall

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    Is it likely that someone trying to get into ENT or Urology would have to complete a GMO tour in the army? Or just being qualified the first time around the best shot?
     
  6. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    For Urology, it's hard to get too good a read on the data, since there are only 7 army slots allocated. 2008 was a good match year, with only 7 applicants for 7 spots.

    Over 2003-2007, here is the ratio of applicants:spots available. Some years you can get straight in. Others, you can't:
    GS Urology (7) 1 1.67 1.67 1.57 1

    For ENT, that's a fellowship. First you have to do internal medicine, which in the Army has a very good history of putting folks straight through. Then you usually have to do a utilization tour of two years before going back to fellowship.
     
  7. deegs

    deegs Member
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    Um, no.

    I'm not sure if your 2008 urology data refers to the match that occurred a few weeks ago, or the match that occurred to select the interns that started in 2008, but in either event, there were unmatched medical student applicants in both years, more this past year than the year before (I am unaware of GMO applicants, but they did not get any of the spots this year, and I don't believe they got any of the spots last year).

    As far as ENT, I think they would be rather pissed to to be referred to as medicine fellows. They are a surgical subspecialty, have their own residency, and usually offer continuous training contracts in the army.
     
  8. mslall

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    i didn't think ENT was a medicine residency at all. I thought you did 1 year as a GS intern then 4 years of otolaryngology and I thought you could match categorically straight through for 5 years, albeit difficult to do so.

    Also, thanks for the info on urology.
     
  9. notdeadyet

    notdeadyet Still in California
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    Interesting. This thread had folks posting Army match data from 2007 and 2008 from MODS that showed those numbers. Huh.
    You're right. I had GI on the brain for some reason. My bad...
     
  10. mslall

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    So what happens if you match for a GS internship, but dont match through residency? I'm assuming you're still off to GMO land? I think this is probably less likely in the army since most of the surgical programs are categorical now......but i'm not sure about ENT or Urology
     
  11. deegs

    deegs Member
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    GS is the only program that doesn't offer continuous contracts, the rest of the surgical specialties, including Uro and ENT, will be matched for the full 5-6 yrs, even if the first 1-2 years are spent on the general surgery service.

    GS continues to have more interns than R2 spots and you have to reapply for your R2 year, but this processes is not quite as malignant as it sounds. Usually the GS intern washout (quit/fired) rate equals the number of excess GS interns SYSTEMWIDE, so if you graduate a GS internship, there will likely be an R2 spot for you SOMEWHERE. But if you happen to be in an abnormal internal class, you could be headed off to GMO land until a spot becomes available.
     
  12. deegs

    deegs Member
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    Actually, if you wade through the thread, urology for 2008 was 1.17 applicants/slot (post#29), which roughly (how do you get 1.17 when you divide a whole number by 7?) corresponds to the unluckly eighth man I met in person. This year (2009) was about 1.71.
     

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