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% of medical students who try to match Anes.?

Discussion in 'Anesthesiology' started by hihihi, Nov 21, 2002.

  1. hihihi

    hihihi Member
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    My question is what percentage of a typical school's class try to match into Anesthesiology. In other words what is the "market share" of Anesthesiology? My school is a school that is heavy in matching students into general practice positions. So, out of 140 medical students, each year about 60% of them match into general medicine. That leaves about 60 students for the remainder of specialties, which would include surgery, er, derm, rad, psyc, path, neuro, and anesthesiology (and others). Well, our school offers 10-12 anesthesiology spots per year. Surely, 12 out of 60 are not going to be interested in Anesthesiology, therefore my chances are almost 100% of getting in here, regardless of my rank in my class...right?

    I should say that my medical school is not a top tier medical school, the only one in my state (which means they prefer home-grown folks), and it does not require a rotation in anesthesiology (which reduces the popularity, I would think). Also, recent history shows that this program matches either "home grown folks" or foreign graduates. Any thoughts?
     
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  3. NaeBlis

    NaeBlis Senior Member
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    First of all, generally speaking 60% of a class does not go into medicine. It is more like 30% going into IM or family, across the nation. Second, many schools only have about 5 anesthesia spots a year, and at my school about 14 people are applying to anesthesia. Third, many schools will hold a few spots from the match if they don't find enough candidates they like, and they fill those spots from other programs, such as surgury or medicine, residents often decide to switch fields after a pg-1 year. Fourth, in some ways matching to anesthesia is like matching to IM, you will probably get a spot but it may not be the spot you want, or at any of the top programs. Anesthesia is getting more and more competative, so i don't think this will be true in even a couple of years.
     
  4. hihihi

    hihihi Member
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    I understand the national statistics, but I am talking about my particular medical school's program. and my chances of getting in here. I couldn't care less about "top programs". Anyway, my medical school's graduating class of 2002 had roughly 75 out of 140 students going into FP, IM, OB/GYN, or PEDS. 8 out of the 140 matched into Anesthesiology, and 3 or 4 of them went somewhere else. So, again, common sense is telling me that I have a damn good shot (regardless of my rank) at getting in here. Am I right?

    I guess most SDNers are from huge states that have lots of programs. My state has 1. Doesn't that put me at an advantage over "outside" applicants?
     
  5. NaeBlis

    NaeBlis Senior Member
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    Well, in that case, it depends on how many people from your school will be applying to anesthesia with you, and how many of them want to go to your school, and there class rank and step 1 scores. You will definately be ranked higher than fmg's or us mds from other schools unless they have done rotations at your school. Beyond that unless you have failed many classes, have some kind of prbationary status or v low step 1 scores <200 you should match at your home school. But again I speak of this years match, your post did not make your class year clear. The match may beccome more competative in years to come and this may not hold true. Finally, it isn't very smart to scoff at the idea of the "top programs" even if it is popular to do so. The reality is that these top programs will ensure that u get a job when u graduate even if the market recedes. And later in life it will ensure that u can get the jobs u want. Whether it is right or wrong it is the reality. If you can try to get into one of the "top programs".
     
  6. Eli T

    Eli T Junior Member
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    HIhihi,

    You know more about how your program works than anyone else who is likely to reply to your email. If your program prioritizes homegrown grads as you state, and if you are in decent academic standing, then you are in great shape. Your math is sound. A meeting with a member of the department might confirm your impression. Of course, interviews are partly to get a sense of your personality, so that is important too.

    Regarding top programs, I remain unconvinced by Naeblis. I am interviewing at some top programs and will compare these to some of the less well known programs I am also visiting. Some of these other programs try to prove themselves on a yearly basis.

    It is true that one's first job is influenced by a residency, and that is important. However, my second job will more likely be based on the merits of my work at my first job, and less on where I trained. Perhaps academic medicine is an exception.

    Top programs tend to attract top applicants, and that can be important. However, a lot of top programs are located in expensive cities (MGH, UCSF, Brig, any NYC program), have less than ideal facilities (Hopkins), or a reputation for overworking their residents. These are important factors, too.

    I have not heard of any programs that have a reputation for producing particularly inept anesthesiologists. Some programs only appear to place their residents regionally, however. If you think you might want to practice outside of that region, consider carefully that program.
     

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