Official 2015-2016 Help Me Rank Megathread

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How would you rank these programs? Open to location but leaning midwest. Hoping for GI or Heme/Onc fellowship.

Indiana
Iowa
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Minnesota
UIC
Rush
Loyola
Medical College of Wisconsin
Utah
Colorado
Louisville
Cincinnati

Appreciate the help! Thank you all!
Utah/Wisco/Colorado
Indy/Iowa/Minn
The rest

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Am I crazy? I don't think so, but just in case, I'm going to ask a bunch of anonymous people on the internet (only half kidding)… Much appreciated!! In the order that I liked them, with educational culture being paramount:

Wisconsin v UPMC
Mount Sinai
NYU
Yale
Brown*
Mayo**
Colorado
Emory
UTSW

(*Loved this program on par with my 1-3, but unsure whether to bump it up the list given its slightly lower reputation?
**I realize they have great emphasis on education and a phenomenal program, but I really do not envision myself living there)
If I had those programs on my list, I'd swap NYU and Colorado (for personal reasons) but it would otherwise be exactly the same.
 
2) NYU (I really feel that Bellevue offers amazing clinical experiences, NYC sounds exciting, not too far from home) but I JUST read that they are switching to 6+2 for interns? That seems kind of scary, and overwhelming, now I'm not so sure.

Mind if I asked where you read this?
 
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Interested in academic cardiology, maybe EP. I'm confused about a handful of programs. The differences in "gut feeling" were kind of small for me, location a minor factor for me, mainly curious about relative differences in cardiology match and research opportunities. I'm from a small city, thus I don't think I'll be unhappy in some of the smaller city "undesirable" locations. I know all of these programs are good, just wondering which ones optimize academic cardiology chances.

1. Duke: Great cardiology program, lots of research opportunities, block schedule is nice. I think the best cardiology match list of all the programs here.
2. Michigan: Great program, lack of block schedule negative for me, but good research opportunities. Hard to get more than 6 wks of research time (every other program gives 3 months pretty much). Probably a top 2-3 EP program. Minor concern is that outside of Michigan, people often don't go to "top" cardiology programs.

Most confused about these 6, I have them in a tentative order but really amenable to moving around:
3.Yale: Despite the dislike this program receives here, I don't think it was any worse than the others. Nice research opportunities, good connections to go to academic programs.
4. Mayo: I really liked this program. I liked the 4+4 schedule, good clinical research opportunities. I have some concerns about the match list and because some advisors have told me that Mayo is not a top program and is not as good as WashU, Northwestern or Vandy. Is it a mistake to rank Mayo this highly?
5. WashU: I liked the program, but got a real sense of car-salesmen like feel to the interview day. Block schedule is nice. The C-STAR program would be a plus.
6. Pitt: 4+4 great, a little concerned that some of the caps seem to be 6-8 patients (which is lighter than other places) and that you don't run codes unless you do a special rotation. I like the Clinical Scientist Track.
7. Northwestern: I liked the people and leadership a lot, non-block schedules, good cardiology program.
8. Vandy: Didn't really connect with the city, really liked the program though, the synthetic derivative is a great research opportunity. Cost of living is going up pretty quickly too, and salaries haven't kept up in my opinion.

I think Vandy, NW and WashU are on par with Michigan, I would put Mayo and Pitt at the bottom, Yale is somewhere between those 2 groups.

Longtime poster but need anonymity. How is this for #3-11? Interested in heme-onc or pulm-cc. Mild west coast preference but want to be able to go east later in life. I enjoy smaller city life (but could have fun in a big city for a while), not working intensely hard (blasphemy), outdoor sports, and warmth/sunshine.

Any programs I am over- or under- estimating here? Any that stand out as strongest?

3. Stanford - Sunny, suburban life, seemingly easygoing culture, closer to home. Question mark for good clinical training (esp Pulm CC)? Can Stanford residents match on the east coast later? I know it's probably self-selection but almost NONE seem to.
4. U Chicago - Residents seemed really smart, and I loved that. Cold city. Necessary commute. Sky rises/not outdoorsy. have had some people say I am ranking this higher than its reputation?
5. Seattle - Outdoor opportunities are great, though residents seem split up all over the place. Would rank higher but I am worried about SAD. genuinely.
6. Michigan - Ann Arbor not the worst place (i like small town life), but cold. Fellowship matches seemed more local than other places? Don't want to end up in the midwest, so I figure why start off there.
7. Yale - Nice program, very warm feeling, but very hard to get to and from Hartford CT if home is far away.
8. Beth Israel - Cool medical education emphasis. I can't tell how well-regarded this program is. It seems to have a very good reputation, but then it's ranked much lower than many of the others here, and -for instance - doesn't even make the top 100 cancer hospitals.
9. Vandy - great program, warm and sunny, low cost of living. not sure about getting stuck in the south (so many people stay where they train, and i'm not super excited about the south)
10. Duke - warm, outdoorsy, looked great, but the reputation for intensely hard work and some ancient whispers of unpleasant culture has dropped it a long way down the list.
11. NW - Was a bit surprised by the wealthy feeling in the hospital, honestly. Just didn't click.

I've heard that it is a slightly easier to go from east to west for fellowship as opposed to the opposite, but this was for Cards/GI, so not sure about other specialties. Chicago and Yale seem high, those would be my bottom 2. Duke seems low, and the rest are pretty much on par with each other in terms of reputation and fellowship match. Your comment on BIDMC ranking is irrelevant, it's a great reputable program.
 
Hey guys -- Thanks for all of your help! Still working on finalizing my list

Your thoughts on George Washington vs Georgetown with respect to GI fellowship placement, clinical training, program reputation? Much appreciated. Also trying to fit UMass somewhere with those three -- right now it's under GW and GT, so thoughts on that would be appreciated as well.
 
Wondering about my top five currently, and really top 2- GI hopeful and interested in academic medicine, looking to stay in Northeast.

1/2 Brown - loved the Chiefs and residents, providence is a great city, but smaller than NYC which I'm used to. PD seems awesome, and overall got a great feeling. Ivy league name helps, and they have some great resources - refugee health, advocacy, school of public health, etc.
1/2 Jefferson - fell in love with this place, residents and chiefs are people I can really see myself hanging out with, and they offer great research and solid GI. location is def a plus. Dont know how they compare to brown though. they offer masters of clinical research that you can complete alongside your residency.
3. Dartmouth - phenomenal program, only reason it's 3 is because of how far it is
4. Temple - shady neighborhood, good program, probably best PD i've met on trail
5. Montefiore - they work very very hard. But they also have a solid resident profile, good community outreach, and amazing match. dont seem too happy though

Anyone have any thoughts ?
 
Longtime poster but need anonymity. How is this for #3-11? Interested in heme-onc or pulm-cc. Mild west coast preference but want to be able to go east later in life. I enjoy smaller city life (but could have fun in a big city for a while), not working intensely hard (blasphemy), outdoor sports, and warmth/sunshine.

Any programs I am over- or under- estimating here? Any that stand out as strongest?

3. Stanford - Sunny, suburban life, seemingly easygoing culture, closer to home. Question mark for good clinical training (esp Pulm CC)? Can Stanford residents match on the east coast later? I know it's probably self-selection but almost NONE seem to.
4. U Chicago - Residents seemed really smart, and I loved that. Cold city. Necessary commute. Sky rises/not outdoorsy. have had some people say I am ranking this higher than its reputation?
5. Seattle - Outdoor opportunities are great, though residents seem split up all over the place. Would rank higher but I am worried about SAD. genuinely.
6. Michigan - Ann Arbor not the worst place (i like small town life), but cold. Fellowship matches seemed more local than other places? Don't want to end up in the midwest, so I figure why start off there.
7. Yale - Nice program, very warm feeling, but very hard to get to and from Hartford CT if home is far away.
8. Beth Israel - Cool medical education emphasis. I can't tell how well-regarded this program is. It seems to have a very good reputation, but then it's ranked much lower than many of the others here, and -for instance - doesn't even make the top 100 cancer hospitals.
9. Vandy - great program, warm and sunny, low cost of living. not sure about getting stuck in the south (so many people stay where they train, and i'm not super excited about the south)
10. Duke - warm, outdoorsy, looked great, but the reputation for intensely hard work and some ancient whispers of unpleasant culture has dropped it a long way down the list.
11. NW - Was a bit surprised by the wealthy feeling in the hospital, honestly. Just didn't click.
Re: going west to east for fellowship, your hunch that it was self selection is correct. A lot of people come out west specifically because that's where they want to end up. Those who come from great programs don't have any barriers in terms of gong bast east of they want to.

As for the rest of your list, nothing looks crazy, though I would personally have had duke higher and u Chicago lower, but if you felt much better about your time at u Chicago, go with it. Good luck!
 
Guys, I need a little help with three programs (gut feeling pretty much the same in all 3). I am pretty sure I want a cardiology fellowship in the future and would like to stay in academic medicine after that.
Baylor vs UPMC vs Cornell
Of note, I have absolutely no objections against Texas. I am scared about living expenses in NYC, but am willing to invest into being there if it clearly offers better training and research opportunities than the other programs.
 
I have a huge range of programs to chose from. I have homes in both Chicago and NYC and would prefer to stay in a big city. Thinking GI or PCCM, but want to leave the door open to doing PC or hospital medicine. Am I nuts for putting NYU at the top?

1-2: NW vs NYU - Got along with the residents and the leadership was amazing at both these locations. Both are close to home and in locations I am familiar with. NW has a great match list and I felt that there is probably more research than NYU. I am worried about autonomy at NW. Also worried about ancillary staff at NYU and scheduling for the interns (starting 6+2 next year).
3. UPMC - Loved the PD and morning report. Location was alright.
4. Michigan - Was recovering from a bad cold when I went so I didn't get to interact with many people. Program felt a bit rigid. Ann Arbor was cute. I worry about the commute (I'm not a big fan of driving - last time I drove was when I got my license 10 yrs ago) and where I'm going to end up living
5/6 Einstein - Didn't get to interact with anyone besides the residents who took me on tour. Close enough to home with subsidized housing. Worried about it's past reputation for overworking residents.
5/6 UW Madison - Legendary PD. Morning report was great. Two interns showed up for the preinterview dinner (red flag?). Worried about living in Madison.
7-9: Hofstra, Brown, Tufts. Probably in that order. Didn't get a good vibe from Tufts and I worry about clinical exposure with low ED volume and MGH being so close. Hofstra seems to have all the new toys.


Thanks.
Hey, a few of us are wondering where you found out that NYU is going to 6+2 for interns next year, BTW that sounds kinda awful :(
 
need some help ranking the following programs. Interested in pursuing cardiology fellowship. Geography doesn't matter to me. This is how I have them currently on my ROL :

UF gainesville
UT houston
MCW
UT San Antonio
U of Louisville
U of Kentucky
Rutgers Newark NJ
U of Kansas
U of Nebraska
SLU
UMKC
Creighton
U of Arkansas
UNM
Hennepin County
Drexel
U of Arizona (tucson, AZ)
 
Hey, a few of us are wondering where you found out that NYU is going to 6+2 for interns next year, BTW that sounds kinda awful :(

Ok guys, I emailed the program coordinator at NYU regarding this issue. Dr. Lou Miller, the senior APD, was kind enough to get back to me and I just want to clarify that this is a COMPLETELY false rumor. I don't know where this originated from, or how this information got propagated, but it is completely false. Every intern, from categorical, to primary care and research track, will be on the 4+2 system and will remain on the 4+2 system. This is my first experience with such incredulous false information on these boards and I just wanted to clear it up for everyone.
 
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Hey everyone,

I'm a med student in the southeast, no AOA, interested in GI. I was wondering if I could get helping with ranking in terms of reputation, and best place for GI fellowship match. Thanks!

1. Wake
2. UIC
3. MUSC
4. OSU - though a great program, the residents during my interview seemed not too happy, which bumped it down my list.
5. MCG

Hey guys,

So originally I thought I had a general idea of what I wanted my rank list to be, but a few recent things seem to have completely changed it. Now I'm absolutely confused as to what options I should pick. My top 5 options all I feel have solid IM training. I'm pretty much set on going to GI for fellowship, and I'd like to match into a program in a big city on the east coast for fellowship (my fiance can only find job opportunities there). Based on that, I'd like to pick a residency that would give me the best opportunities to build up my resume and give me a solid IM experience. I would greatly appreciate if anyone can help me figure things out! So my rank list now is:

1. Ohio State - After talking to some of the residents again, it seems like they get plenty of awesome research opportunities. They all interviewed at some impressive GI places. I feel like they're definitely one of the bigger names on my list. The only con is they seemed to be worked really hard, and said they'd like more time to research.
2. MUSC - The chair is a hepatologist who is very active in helping the residents secure GI fellowships. Apparently he has some great connections he pulls for his residents. The program is great, has a strong GI component. Their residents also interviewed at great places. The biggest con is their reputation, they're not too well known according to the residents. And their reach seems to be mostly in the southeast. I feel like this might limit my options. Just that is confusing me on where to rank it.
3. Wake - Great program, awesome PD, really friendly residents, location close to home. But recently their residents repeatedly told me there is not a heavy GI research focus there. They are more clinical focused. Wake is definitely a bigger name than MUSC but their lack of research focus is making me rank it below. One resident, though matched into GI, came out with no publications. That really worried me.
4. University of Cincinnati - overall everything is great. The PD and I clicked well. The residents are people I'd feel very comfortable with. They have good research opportunities. Cons I wasn't too excited about their 16 month long inpatient block, then ambulatory block. It felt like the residents loved it, but it wasn't something I felt I'd like. Also the city was ok according to me. I'm debating whether to put it above Wake. The only reason Wake is above is because of location close to home.
5. MCG

I'd greatly appreciate any input regarding my concerns. Thanks a lot guys!
 
need some help ranking the following programs. Interested in pursuing cardiology fellowship. Geography doesn't matter to me. This is how I have them currently on my ROL :

UF gainesville
UT houston
MCW
UT San Antonio
U of Louisville
U of Kentucky
Rutgers Newark NJ
U of Kansas
U of Nebraska
SLU
UMKC
Creighton
U of Arkansas
UNM
Hennepin County
Drexel
U of Arizona (tucson, AZ)
why'd you interview at so many places bro
 
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why'd you interview at so many places bro
Some of the places on that list I didn't hear from till later in the IV cycle. I took and went on interviews as I got them.

Still looking for someone to input on earlier post please.
 
Some of the places on that list I didn't hear from till later in the IV cycle. I took and went on interviews as I got them.

Still looking for someone to input on earlier post please.

If it were me, I'd think UT Houston/Kentucky/Arizona/SLU were a tier above everything else. Being in Texas I can say that UT Houston is looked very favorably upon for the most part (UTSW >/= BCM > UTH > the rest). Texas Heart Institute is technically affiliated with UTH (even though BCM now owns St Lukes, which owns THI... it's all pretty political) so they match quite well in cards and usually send at least 1 x year to THI. Some big names at THI are still UTH professors (e.g. Denton Cooley, James T. Willerson, etc.) and doing cards research is very readily available. You also USED to do rotations at THI but BCM now has the major presence there (though this is still being discussed because the Baylor residents feel pretty overworked without the UTH presence lol). I've heard universally good things about Kentucky from many people who've interviewed there and they have a pretty strong fellowship match. Arizona is a very strong program in general (I might be biased though, being from California originally). SLU I've heard of and they seem to have a good reputation with Wash U. Keep in mind this is all speculative though (as much of this list process is) because I've had more exposure to schools in the south, west, and east and not so much in the great lakes region and north-northeast, so take it with a grain of salt. At the very least I've heard of those four that were mentioned, along with Drexel, Louisville and Rutgers, so you may not be limited as regionally as some of the others, and I can speak to the strength of those four programs. If I were in you position (and again, you're not me so this is all relative), I would rank those four as I'd like them and then everything else if you want to do cards.
 
help me guys. Would i be nuts to rank
Carolinas Medical Center then Kentucky
or
Kentucky /Carolinas Medical Center
over
UAB, Iowa?

Interested in Hospital Medicine. Any input appreciated
 
If it were me, I'd think UT Houston/Kentucky/Arizona/SLU were a tier above everything else. Being in Texas I can say that UT Houston is looked very favorably upon for the most part (UTSW >/= BCM > UTH > the rest). Texas Heart Institute is technically affiliated with UTH (even though BCM now owns St Lukes, which owns THI... it's all pretty political) so they match quite well in cards and usually send at least 1 x year to THI. Some big names at THI are still UTH professors (e.g. Denton Cooley, James T. Willerson, etc.) and doing cards research is very readily available. You also USED to do rotations at THI but BCM now has the major presence there (though this is still being discussed because the Baylor residents feel pretty overworked without the UTH presence lol). I've heard universally good things about Kentucky from many people who've interviewed there and they have a pretty strong fellowship match. Arizona is a very strong program in general (I might be biased though, being from California originally). SLU I've heard of and they seem to have a good reputation with Wash U. Keep in mind this is all speculative though (as much of this list process is) because I've had more exposure to schools in the south, west, and east and not so much in the great lakes region and north-northeast, so take it with a grain of salt. At the very least I've heard of those four that were mentioned, along with Drexel, Louisville and Rutgers, so you may not be limited as regionally as some of the others, and I can speak to the strength of those four programs. If I were in you position (and again, you're not me so this is all relative), I would rank those four as I'd like them and then everything else if you want to do cards.


Thanks for your reply. I really appreciate your input. I don't think Arizona had a very strong cards match last I checked their fellowship match. Also, for Drexel I really tried liking the program but the idea of completely paper charts really put me off - they do have a strong cards match though




















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Guys, I need a little help with three programs (gut feeling pretty much the same in all 3). I am pretty sure I want a cardiology fellowship in the future and would like to stay in academic medicine after that.
Baylor vs UPMC vs Cornell
Of note, I have absolutely no objections against Texas. I am scared about living expenses in NYC, but am willing to invest into being there if it clearly offers better training and research opportunities than the other programs.
Any takers?
 
If I had those programs on my list, I'd swap NYU and Colorado (for personal reasons) but it would otherwise be exactly the same.

Thank you for the input!

I actually really enjoyed Colorado, and would definitely be ranking it higher if it weren't for a constellation of personal and family factors.
 
Interested in academic cardiology, maybe EP. I'm confused about a handful of programs. The differences in "gut feeling" were kind of small for me, location a minor factor for me, mainly curious about relative differences in cardiology match and research opportunities. I'm from a small city, thus I don't think I'll be unhappy in some of the smaller city "undesirable" locations. I know all of these programs are good, just wondering which ones optimize academic cardiology chances.

1. Duke: Great cardiology program, lots of research opportunities, block schedule is nice. I think the best cardiology match list of all the programs here.
2. Michigan: Great program, lack of block schedule negative for me, but good research opportunities. Hard to get more than 6 wks of research time (every other program gives 3 months pretty much). Probably a top 2-3 EP program. Minor concern is that outside of Michigan, people often don't go to "top" cardiology programs.

Most confused about these 6, I have them in a tentative order but really amenable to moving around:
3.Yale: Despite the dislike this program receives here, I don't think it was any worse than the others. Nice research opportunities, good connections to go to academic programs.
4. Mayo: I really liked this program. I liked the 4+4 schedule, good clinical research opportunities. I have some concerns about the match list and because some advisors have told me that Mayo is not a top program and is not as good as WashU, Northwestern or Vandy. Is it a mistake to rank Mayo this highly?
5. WashU: I liked the program, but got a real sense of car-salesmen like feel to the interview day. Block schedule is nice. The C-STAR program would be a plus.
6. Pitt: 4+4 great, a little concerned that some of the caps seem to be 6-8 patients (which is lighter than other places) and that you don't run codes unless you do a special rotation. I like the Clinical Scientist Track.
7. Northwestern: I liked the people and leadership a lot, non-block schedules, good cardiology program.
8. Vandy: Didn't really connect with the city, really liked the program though, the synthetic derivative is a great research opportunity. Cost of living is going up pretty quickly too, and salaries haven't kept up in my opinion.
For clinical EP, at this time Michigan and Mayo are the strongest program. NW is great as well.
 
I'm writing this as a PGY6 at arguably the top cardiology fellowship in the country.

None of you have any idea what the hell you are talking about.

Go where you think you will be happy.

All the rest is noise.
I think I love you
 
Hi guys I need some help with my rank list. I am hoping to get a pulm crit fellowship later. Right now this is what it looks like.
1) USC
2) Scripps Green
3) Loma Linda
4) Olive View
5) Kaiser LA
6) California Pacific
7) UC Riverside.
8) The rest
 
Hi guys I need some help with my rank list. I am hoping to get a pulm crit fellowship later. Right now this is what it looks like.
1) USC
2) Scripps Green
3) Loma Linda
4) Olive View
5) Kaiser LA
6) California Pacific
7) UC Riverside.
8) The rest

Ah California. This is something i can speak on. Your top four look spot on (give or take Olive View - some would rank it higher some would keep it as is). Also seems that you have a bit of a SoCal bent which tells me that you're smart and can make logical decisions ;D. By reputation, I would've ranked cpmc higher but i dont think it makes a discernible enough difference to justify ranking it above where you want to live. I would keep your list as is.
 
Hi guys I need some help with my rank list. I am hoping to get a pulm crit fellowship later. Right now this is what it looks like.
1) USC
2) Scripps Green
3) Loma Linda
4) Olive View
5) Kaiser LA
6) California Pacific
7) UC Riverside.
8) The rest

I would order it the same way. Maybe scripps green above USC.
 
Ah California. This is something i can speak on. Your top four look spot on (give or take Olive View - some would rank it higher some would keep it as is). Also seems that you have a bit of a SoCal bent which tells me that you're smart and can make logical decisions ;D. By reputation, I would've ranked cpmc higher but i dont think it makes a discernible enough difference to justify ranking it above where you want to live. I would keep your list as is.

I would order it the same way. Maybe scripps green above USC.

I am actually debating switching Loma Linda and Olive View mainly because of the location. As for CPMC it is the cost of living and me not liking NorCal in particular was the main reason.

Do you guys have any comments on fellowship matches for pulm crit at Greens, Olive View and Kaiser? I lost my notes and remember being satisfied at the answer I got but forgot what they actually said. Kaiser said something about paying for 2 of the 6 spots available or something like that. I am emailing the PDs now to ask but if you guys know anything please help me. Thank you.

Edit: Why Scripps above USC? Can you elaborate? Thank you.
 
Hey everyone, interested in cards, please let me know your thoughts on ROL:

Emory
UTSW
Baylor (Houston)
U Southern Cal
Cedars Sinai
UT Houston
MUSC

Thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
Folks,

I have got a humble bunch here and wondering how to rank them? With ROL deadline fat approaching, I would appreciate anything you may know about these programs?

What I know about the programs is given next to them:

Maimonides, Brooklyn, NY
-Has in house fellowships, larger program in terms of PGY-1 positions

Richmond University Medical Center, State Island, NY
-Has in house fellowships

Mather Hospital, Port Jefferson, NY
- New program, affiliated with Stony Brook Medicine, nice location, no residents have graduated yet, Most senior class is PGY-2

St. Luke’s Hospital, Chesterfield, MO

-Nice Location, Has good track record in fellowship placements

Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, MA
-Location is little remote, no in house fellowships

Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, NJ

-Location is good but program seemed OK

Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN - Family Medicine

-Ok program, only family medicine program I got so probably will be lowest on the list

Thank you for your time!
 
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You keep posting multiple times. People aren't as familiar with these community programs, consider finding another resource.

Folks,

I have got a humble bunch here and wondering how to rank them? With ROL deadline fat approaching, I would appreciate anything you may know about these programs?

What I know about the programs is given next to them:

Maimonides, Brooklyn, NY
-Has in house fellowships, larger program in terms of PGY-1 positions

Richmond University Medical Center, State Island, NY
-Has in house fellowships

Mather Hospital, Port Jefferson, NY
- New program, affiliated with Stony Brook Medicine, nice location, no residents have graduated yet, Most senior class is PGY-2

St. Luke’s Hospital, Chesterfield, MO

-Nice Location, Has good track record in fellowship placements

Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, MA
-Location is little remote, no in house fellowships

Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, NJ

-Location is good but program seemed OK

Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN - Family Medicine

-Ok program, only family medicine program I got so probably will be lowest on the list

Thank you for your time!
 
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I am actually debating switching Loma Linda and Olive View mainly because of the location. As for CPMC it is the cost of living and me not liking NorCal in particular was the main reason.

Do you guys have any comments on fellowship matches for pulm crit at Greens, Olive View and Kaiser? I lost my notes and remember being satisfied at the answer I got but forgot what they actually said. Kaiser said something about paying for 2 of the 6 spots available or something like that. I am emailing the PDs now to ask but if you guys know anything please help me. Thank you.

Edit: Why Scripps above USC? Can you elaborate? Thank you.

Just on reputation alone. Although USC will probably provide you with better pulm crit experience.

Things may be changing as it seems USC rep has been much better these past few years.

Outdated source: http://forums.studentdoctor.net/threads/southern-california-rank.487956/
 
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Anyone have the class of 2016 fellowship match list for UMinn ? Thanks
 
Thank you for your reply. I didn't realize that it's because of unfamiliarity with these programs that I wasn't getting any response and my post may have been getting lost in the shuffle. Makes sense, thank you again for chiming in. Good luck to all in the Match!
You keep posting multiple times. People aren't as familiar with these community programs, consider finding another resource.
 
Folks,

I have got a humble bunch here and wondering how to rank them? With ROL deadline fat approaching, I would appreciate anything you may know about these programs?

What I know about the programs is given next to them:

Maimonides, Brooklyn, NY
-Has in house fellowships, larger program in terms of PGY-1 positions

Richmond University Medical Center, State Island, NY
-Has in house fellowships

Mather Hospital, Port Jefferson, NY
- New program, affiliated with Stony Brook Medicine, nice location, no residents have graduated yet, Most senior class is PGY-2

St. Luke’s Hospital, Chesterfield, MO

-Nice Location, Has good track record in fellowship placements

Berkshire Medical Center, Pittsfield, MA
-Location is little remote, no in house fellowships

Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, NJ

-Location is good but program seemed OK

Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN - Family Medicine

-Ok program, only family medicine program I got so probably will be lowest on the list

Thank you for your time!

I'm not super familiar with these programs either but it really looks like you have the right idea, ranking programs in regards to whether or not they have in house fellowships. That's a wise decision. While I can't speak to the program I can say that as a hospital, Maimonides is a rare example of stability in Brooklyn (lots of Brooklyn hospitals have been closing down while Maimonides has been buying up private practices in the area). There're also talks of a formal affiliation between Maimonides and NS-LIJ: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/articl...150209957/maimonides-north-shore-lij-in-talks. Sorry, can't really speak to any of the other programs though.
 
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aw crud ... guess upmc is moving down my list...

I agree re list. I can't find any info beyond the Colorado website. This is a frustrating situation because a program director is a crucial part of ones training and because I don't even know who her replacement is. That is on top of the fact that she was a particular strength of the program based on what almost anyone who interviewed there would say. I wish that UPMC would give their applicants some information before February 24. It's a very sensitive time for big changes and while that's not in the program's control necessarily, full disclosure is.
 
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I agree re list. I can't find any info beyond the Colorado website. This is a frustrating situation because a program director is a crucial part of ones training and because I don't even know who her replacement is. That is on top of the fact that she was a particular strength of the program based on what almost anyone who interviewed there would say. I wish that UPMC would give their applicants some information before February 24. It's a very sensitive time for big changes and while that's not in the program's control necessarily, full disclosure is.

Another program where I interviewed the PD talked to us about the program but told us that he was stepping down from his position, introduced the new PD and the new PD then discussed how he envisioned the program growing/changing w/ his leadership. I don't think that program really could've handled that situation better in terms of the way they presented it to the applicants. Gave us all the info we needed and assured us of them doing everything to provide seamless transition.

I do wonder how long this has been in the works at Pitt. The PD is not my top concern for a program, but it is the one thing that can change very quickly. They need to send applicants an update on the situation, even if its a "this was unexpected and we are currently actively searching/recruiting a new PD. This person will act in the interim..." I agree with you that full disclosure is most important in a situation like this. In my mind, it reflects well when a program, even when things aren't completely figured out, can at least reach out to applicants to let us know of the situation as this would be the place where we are spending the next 3 years of our lives in training.
 
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Yes, my broad strategy has been to rank the programs that have in-house fellowships first and then the rest. Although looking at the fellowship placement of rest of the community programs, they seem to have decent record. I guess having an in-house fellowship may give the current residents a leg up as in it's a home program. Like with anything, one has to take it upon oneself to do good in a program even if they don't have in-house fellowship..what's that..an excellent student in an average school can do better than an average student in an excellent school.

I'm not super familiar with these programs either but it really looks like you have the right idea, ranking programs in regards to whether or not they have in house fellowships. That's a wise decision. While I can't speak to the program I can say that as a hospital, Maimonides is a rare example of stability in Brooklyn (lots of Brooklyn hospitals have been closing down while Maimonides has been buying up private practices in the area). There're also talks of a formal affiliation between Maimonides and NS-LIJ: http://www.crainsnewyork.com/articl...150209957/maimonides-north-shore-lij-in-talks. Sorry, can't really speak to any of the other programs though.
 
Yes, my broad strategy has been to rank the programs that have in-house fellowships first and then the rest. Although looking at the fellowship placement of rest of the community programs, they seem to have decent record. I guess having an in-house fellowship may give the current residents a leg up as in it's a home program. Like with anything, one has to take it upon oneself to do good in a program even if they don't have in-house fellowship..what's that..an excellent student in an average school can do better than an average student in an excellent school.

I can't say too much about your list of programs other than maimo. I've never interviewed there but it is a fairly run hospital with a good population mix from location alone. good luck.
 
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Hello! Freaking out about the middle of my list! Any advice is appreciated! Asked a ton of doctors at my school, and put their comments in brackets. This is the order in which I have it right now.

Maryland (strong consensus that it was the best amongst this bunch ... but I'm just slightly worried about Baltimore)
RWJ (no one seemed to know much about it)
Temple (all docs at my school, and scaring me that it is super unsafe?)
Stony Brook (no strong opinion except some put it in the same tier as Temple?)
NJMS Newark (again, I think people were stuck in the past and just considered it to be malignant)
VCU (overall good opinion .... but personally I won't be too happy being away from family - but maybe I should suck it up for a couple of years? I wanted to start a family :( in the next couple of years!)

Interested in a cards fellowship. I have family in NY, and was trying to figure out if ranking VCU lower is ok ... or if I should move it over some of the programs above it.

Thanks!
 
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Hey everyone, interested in cards, please let me know your thoughts on ROL:

Emory
UTSW
Baylor (Houston)
U Southern Cal
Cedars Sinai
UT Houston
MUSC

Thanks in advance.

looks like a good list. may move up Cedars higher given reputation of its cardiology division.. May go like this.. Emory=UTSW (for cardiology alone the divisions are comparable, for strength of internal medicine training UTSW is in a higher tier)> Cedars= Baylor> USC for cardiology.. MUSC might be better than UTH.. The cardiology division at UTH is not very good and malignant from what I have hard (abusive attendings) etc. MUSC is a chill program in a good southern city.. no high power academics.. but people seemed to be happy.
 
Hello! Freaking out about the middle of my list! Any advice is appreciated! Asked a ton of doctors at my school, and put their comments in brackets. This is the order in which I have it right now.

Maryland (strong consensus that it was the best amongst this bunch ... but I'm just slightly worried about Baltimore)
RWJ (no one seemed to know much about it)
Temple (all docs at my school, and scaring me that it is super unsafe?)
Stony Brook (no strong opinion except some put it in the same tier as Temple?)
NJMS Newark (again, I think people were stuck in the past and just considered it to be malignant)
VCU (overall good opinion .... but personally I won't be too happy being away from family - but maybe I should suck it up for a couple of years? I wanted to start a family :( in the next couple of years!)

Interested in a cards fellowship. I have family in NY, and was trying to figure out if ranking VCU lower is ok ... or if I should move it over some of the programs above it.

Thanks!
VCU has had a good division for years... esp w/ Ellenbogen and Vetroveck and if you are able to work w/ some good guys there.. it would match you well in to cardiology. No strong feelings about other programs on your list.
 
Hello! Freaking out about the middle of my list! Any advice is appreciated! Asked a ton of doctors at my school, and put their comments in brackets. This is the order in which I have it right now.

Maryland (strong consensus that it was the best amongst this bunch ... but I'm just slightly worried about Baltimore)
RWJ (no one seemed to know much about it)
Temple (all docs at my school, and scaring me that it is super unsafe?)
Stony Brook (no strong opinion except some put it in the same tier as Temple?)
NJMS Newark (again, I think people were stuck in the past and just considered it to be malignant)
VCU (overall good opinion .... but personally I won't be too happy being away from family - but maybe I should suck it up for a couple of years? I wanted to start a family :( in the next couple of years!)

Interested in a cards fellowship. I have family in NY, and was trying to figure out if ranking VCU lower is ok ... or if I should move it over some of the programs above it.

Thanks!

Sent you a PM - check it out.
 
Another program where I interviewed the PD talked to us about the program but told us that he was stepping down from his position, introduced the new PD and the new PD then discussed how he envisioned the program growing/changing w/ his leadership. I don't think that program really could've handled that situation better in terms of the way they presented it to the applicants. Gave us all the info we needed and assured us of them doing everything to provide seamless transition.

I do wonder how long this has been in the works at Pitt. The PD is not my top concern for a program, but it is the one thing that can change very quickly. They need to send applicants an update on the situation, even if its a "this was unexpected and we are currently actively searching/recruiting a new PD. This person will act in the interim..." I agree with you that full disclosure is most important in a situation like this. In my mind, it reflects well when a program, even when things aren't completely figured out, can at least reach out to applicants to let us know of the situation as this would be the place where we are spending the next 3 years of our lives in training.

Pitt resident. We were also heartbroken by Dr Zimmer's decision. It was officially anounced about 2 weeks ago. Dr Jen Corbelli who was one of the associate PDs is gonna be the new PD. She's a former chief here and is extremely involved with the program, so there wouldn't be any major changes.
 
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I'm really having a hard time between UPMC and NYU people. (This is for my #2 / #3)

-Both similar distance to me (NYU probably slightly more accessible)
-want to do academic GIM, or maybe Renal/ID (Non-competitive things)
-want good GIM training
-cost is important, but I think I could manage on 62 in NYC (Barely, but would manage esp. cause NYU has some subsidized housing)
-NYU seems more exciting, UPMC seems more "comfortable"
-Reputation seems similar b/w the two

Any input?
 
I wanted to get someones opinion on this, does the training differ that much in going to a UT SanAntonio or a University of OK vs Baylor or UTSW? I know reputation is just so important to Many people, but my goal is to practice cardiology or hem/onc in a private setting and not in a major city like NYC, Chicago, LA etc. so in this case does it make a big difference? Can I achieve that from a "mid-tier" program?

My top 2 choices are Baylor and OU OKC and I really like them both for different reasons. Any suggestions?
 
I wanted to get someones opinion on this, does the training differ that much in going to a UT SanAntonio or a University of OK vs Baylor or UTSW? I know reputation is just so important to Many people, but my goal is to practice cardiology or hem/onc in a private setting and not in a major city like NYC, Chicago, LA etc. so in this case does it make a big difference? Can I achieve that from a "mid-tier" program?

My top 2 choices are Baylor and OU OKC and I really like them both for different reasons. Any suggestions?

I'm going to regale you a tale from my buddy who just finished fellowship and is now a big shot attending at a major academic med center. Most pedigreed guy you'll ever meet. Best advice he gave me was that if you're not going to go into academics, train where you want to work or where you'll be happiest. This sentiment has been echoed time and time again and I feel that too many people don't realize this. My dad tells me all the time about how they'll consistently get applicants from top tier institutions (he once got an application from a big shot attending at Stanford who was fed up with academics) and more often than not, he'll prefer the programs in the area (Scripps, harbor ucla, etc) to the ones with bigger names (Hopkins, Stanford, etc.) for two reasons. #1 - he has more exposure and experience with people from these programs. A lot of people at the hospital are graduates from these programs and networking is a big deal (lol as if you didn't know this already). #2 - If he sees someone who's been super pedigreed with no real reason to move to socal from boston (not even an "I want to live in socal" one liner), then he'll really start to question why they're applying to a private hospital and not to one of the many academic institutions in the area. Is having a pedigreed CV ever a disadvantage? I don't think so. But keep in mind that even the most pedigreed institutions have some degree of geographic limitation. Why do the vast majority of graduates from the WashU programs practice in St. Louis? Is it because St. Louis is such a stellar city to live in? I doubt it. It's more so because you begin to form connections in residency with not only the employers in the area but the people around you. You begin to lay down roots that bind you in perhaps the best ways (not to mention that it's pretty annoying to re-license in a different state lol). UTSA internal medicine is great (classmates interviewed there and raved about the culture and leadership). I've heard pretty good things about OU too. They tend to match internally moreso than graduates at UTSW and Baylor, but if you have family or friends or any compelling reason to go to the former, then I dont think anyone will fault you for that decision. Are UTSW and Baylor more renowned institutions? Sure, but if you're going to be happier at UTSA and OU, then you should definitely make that decision accordingly. You're smart in that you know what your end goal is. I encourage you to keep that in mind when choosing the next step.
 
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I'm really having a hard time between UPMC and NYU people. (This is for my #2 / #3)

-Both similar distance to me (NYU probably slightly more accessible)
-want to do academic GIM, or maybe Renal/ID (Non-competitive things)
-want good GIM training
-cost is important, but I think I could manage on 62 in NYC (Barely, but would manage esp. cause NYU has some subsidized housing)
-NYU seems more exciting, UPMC seems more "comfortable"
-Reputation seems similar b/w the two

Any input?

Here at Pitt, our GIM program is one of the strongest in the country and several residents choose to stay here where there's ridiculous amount of research going on with some legends like Dr Bob Arnold from Palliative and Dr Greenspan from Geri. People that left in the past 3-4 years did great and went to top places like UCSF, Hopkins and BWH. People applying to Renal do really well too, lots on research opportunities basic a clinical especially with the CCM department that is huge here. For ID, we are a particular reference for transplant ID.

You can't go wrong with NYU either which has a similar reputation, but the NYC factor is the major thing here.

Bottom line is You should pick purely based on location/gut feeling.
 
Here at Pitt, our GIM program is one of the strongest in the country and several residents choose to stay here where there's ridiculous amount of research going on with some legends like Dr Bob Arnold from Palliative and Dr Greenspan from Geri. People that left in the past 3-4 years did great and went to top places like UCSF, Hopkins and BWH. People applying to Renal do really well too, lots on research opportunities basic a clinical especially with the CCM department that is huge here. For ID, we are a particular reference for transplant ID.

You can't go wrong with NYU either which has a similar reputation, but the NYC factor is the major thing here.

Bottom line is You should pick purely based on location/gut feeling.
Thank you,

Yea I think you're right about the gut feeling, though I think UPMC does have the edge for GIM and related specialties, plus ID is a super power house there. I love the resident-run rounds (though both UPMC and NYU have that (such a gem IMO), and also the "jr. hospitalist" at UPMC seems exciting. I'll likely end up having UPMC edge out NYU also cause I like the outdoors so much!
 
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