Older Pre-Meds...

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by FLY, Nov 8, 2002.

  1. FLY

    FLY Senior Member

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    Nothing against them Older Pre-Meds. Only admiration if anything.

    The ones I know are like the Super-Pre-Meds, (you maybe one too), for labs and in class, they go well beyond what is excessive in terms of writing up lab reports and preparing for classes etc.

    From a numbers and life experiences stand point, the definetly have the normal applicants beat.

    But, in the eyes of the Adcomm's, are they much more desirable, considering that they are around 45 and by the time they are done with residencies, they are definetly 50+, is it worth to spend shrinking resources on someone who will not be able to contribute at least 20+ years for Healthcare.

    Does this mean an Older Pre-med with stellar stats and a Younger Pre-med with normal stats would be equal in the eyes of the Adcomm.
     
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  3. 2badr

    2badr **Switch**

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    That is a broad assumption about the 50+.You are under the assumption that a person's contribution declines with age.I personally would not want to be laid out to pasture at the age of 75. ever hear of Red Duke? Micheal Debakey? (Think about the Houston ER show that aired over the summer).
    I heard a story on tv once and this doctor was still practicing (I think she was either a pediatrician or a family practitioner) at 100.
    If I wait until I am 40 to apply to medschool, having you on the adcoms would really depress me ;)
     
  4. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    I guess I'll let you know in 6 months time or so....
     
  5. Megalofyia

    Megalofyia 425 lbs and growing

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    How do you know a younger pre-med would be practicing medicine for 20 or more years? What if after all that training they decide they no longer want to be physicians. I know several people who have just graduated and now have no plans on being doctors. Someone who is older and wants to be a doctor is far more likely to still want to be a doctor after those 7+ years of training.

    Another thing to consider is none of us know when we're going to die. There's nothing saying that someone who's 22 still has 50 years of life left or that someone who's 45 only has 28 years.
     
  6. Zardoz

    Zardoz Junior Member

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    50?! Sheeeeeyit! I'm only 32!
     
  7. tBw

    tBw totally deluded

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    well, the older you get, the faster the years pass ;) :laugh:
     
  8. conure

    conure Master Distiller

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    where did you get this age 45 thing?

    I would bet that most older premeds you meet are around 30 and those over forty are a minority. I would guess less than 1% of applicants are that age.

    The average age in most medical schools is 24-25. That means there are some 22 and some 30 and maybe even a 38 or 40 year old.

    Age means nothing in this whole process. It is your ability and your experience that counts.
     
  9. sdellenbaugh

    sdellenbaugh New Member

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    Well, that is not really true, or so I have heard. It's really wonderful and admirable for a late 50s-early 60 yr old to want to go to medical school, but most schools will not admit them, because they will never complete their residencies and practice for any realistic amount of time.

    Personally, it is freaky enough to be starting the interview process at 29 (like me!)

    Sam
     
  10. CamelJockey

    CamelJockey Member

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    I'm right there with you Sam! Not alone in that age group. I find it interesting some of the posts about 'postbacs' or 'premeds' and relating to 'super grades' or 'above and beyond' course work. I have probably been guilty of that...but I can't say it was hard work. I have been out of school for 5 yrs and for work I crunch numbers and built charts and briefings. SO, for a Lab class, for me to make cheesey looking graph or chart takes me about 5 minutes. I remember laboring all nite on that junk when I was an undergrad. A little experience can go a loooong way...
     
  11. SM-UCLA tech

    SM-UCLA tech CCOM MS4 soon OB/Gyn PGY1

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    Fly......I am not saying this in a mean spirited way.....but your comments reflect your age.

    I suggest you save what you just wrote....and when you reach the age you are commenting about....you will realize how ridiculous it sounds.

    By the way.....I'm a ripe old 32!
     
  12. kutastha

    kutastha 2K Member
    Physician

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    Ditto. There were a couple threads about this a year or so ago. It usually comes down to the younger ones saying that they have just as much experience and are just as mature as the older ones and that they know older people who aren't mature. It's really weird.
     
  13. DALABROKA

    DALABROKA Raider Hater

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    Unfortunately, the pervading opinion of the former adcom members I know is that the older premeds are at a severe disadvantage for exactly the reasons mentioned. They have a hard time giving the go ahead to someone much over 35 if they are as equally qualified as some younger students. They have told me that the issues surrounding expected length of service compared to that of younger students was sometimes too much to overlook. However, this has been really changing in the last 10 years or so. They also said that the length of service issue is more prevalent at state schools because, after all, their mission is to provide physicians to the state residents and much of the costs associated with the medical schools are passed on to the tax payers. So, in a way, the adcom looks at this as providing the best quality physicians with the longest expected service "payback" to the residents of the state in which they receive their training.:rolleyes:

    DALA
     
  14. nina512

    nina512 Senior Member

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    The older I've gotten (not that I'm older, only 24), I've learned that my time and money is of too much value for me to do something half-assed. I think a lot of older pre-meds feel the same way, hence the "super pre-med" performance. Also, they don't have to deal with personal developmental issues while in school, because they have already experienced it and grown from it.
    During undergrad, I wished I could be like the older pre-meds. They were so focused, but I think that is something that comes with time. If I would have known that it would take me so long to develop that level of discipline, I would have started my undergrad a few years later, and really got my money's worth.
     
  15. DrMom

    DrMom Official Mom of SDN
    Physician Moderator Emeritus

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    I agree wholeheartedly!

    I would have done fine if I had gone straight from college to med school, but I'm a much better (and well-rounded) med student now.
     

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